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  • £16.99

    Penlee (Score) (Brass Band/Score) - Simon Dobson

    To some, the tragic story of the Penlee lifeboat, , would need no introduction, and to some the pain felt is still very much a reality. The composer, born just a few weeks before that fateful night on the 19th December 1981, has created this work as a musical homage to the bravery of the souls who lost their lives and has dedicated it to their memory.was commissioned by the Cornwall Youth Brass Band using funds bequeathed by Michael Pickett. The first performance was given by the Cornish Youth Brass Band, conducted by Ian Porthouse, at St. Michael's Church, Newquay, on 30th December 2008.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £25.00

    La Musica Notturna Delle Strade di Madrid

    DescriptionLuigi Boccherini was born in Lucca, Italy, into a musical family. His father, a cellist and double-bass player, sent him to study in Rome at a young age. In 1757 they both went to Vienna, where the court employed them as musicians in the Burgtheater. In 1761 Boccherini went to Madrid, entering the employ of Prince Luis Antonio of Spain, younger brother of King Charles III. There he flourished under royal patronage, until one day when the King expressed his disapproval at a passage in a new trio, and ordered Boccherini to change it. The composer, no doubt irritated with this intrusion into his art, doubled the passage instead, which led to his immediate dismissal. Then he accompanied Don Luis to Arenas de San Pedro, a little town in the Gredos mountains, where Boccherini wrote many of his most famous works. Although neglected after his death and throughout the 19th and early 20th century (he was known mockingly as 'Haydn's Wife' for a time), Boccherini's music has been rediscovered in recent decades.La Musica Notturna delle Strade di Madrid('Night Music of the Streets of Madrid') is a string quintet of seven short movements composed during Boccherini's exile in Arenas, no doubt to remind him and his prince of happier times. The music is reminiscent of "the gaiety and bustle of Spain's capital, recalling the sound of the city's church bells ringing for evening prayer, the popular dances that were the delight of its young people, and the blind beggars singing their typical songs". This arrangement excludes the first and last two movements, comprising the middle four:Il Tamburo di Soldati(The Soldier's Drum)Minuetto dei Ciechi(The Minuet of the Blind Beggars)Il Rosario(The Rosary)Passe Calle(The Passacaglia of the Street Singers)The music was featured in the Russell Crowe filmMaster and Commander: The Far Side of the World(2003) set during the Napoleonic Wars and featuring the adventures of the Royal Navy ship HMS Surprise and her captain Jack Aubrey as they pursue the French ship Acheron into the Pacific Ocean.To view a PDF preview of the score click here.Duration approximately 5'00".

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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  • £45.00

    strange geometry

    strange geometrywas commissioned by Morgan Griffiths and the Hammonds Saltaire Band for their performance at the Brass in Concert Championships of 2015.As a bit of a space/sci-fi geek, as well as a musician, two events during the summer of 2015 had a particular effect on me. The first was the tragic early death in a plane crash of the famous film composer James Horner. Horner's music, particularly in films like ‘Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan’, ‘Avatar’, ‘Apollo 13’ and even his debut in Roger Corman's 1980 budget film ‘Battle Beyond the Stars’, defined for a generation the sound of sci-fi at the cinema. Along with John Williams he created the vocabulary for those who wish to express other-worldly wonder in music and his inventive talent will be much missed in an industry where originality has become something of a dirty word in recent years.The second event was the epic flyby of Pluto by the NASA New Horizons spacecraft. There are many reasons to find this mission inspiring – for example, the scientists and engineers behind it created a craft that has travelled at 37,000 mph for nine years and three billion miles to arrive within seventy-two seconds of the predicted time for the flyby. That they achieved this with such accuracy is an outstanding tribute to humanity's ingenuity and insatiable curiosity. However, the most exciting aspect of the mission was the clear, high resolution pictures of this unthinkably remote and inhospitable world beamed back to mission control. The best previous image of Pluto was an indistinct fuzzy blob – suddenly we could see mountains made of ice, glaciers of methane and carbon monoxide and nitrogen fog – features previously unimagined on a world thought to be a slightly dull ball of cold rock. The BBC's venerable astronomy programme 'The Sky at Night' waxed lyrical about these newly discovered features, referring to "the surprising discoveries of mountains and strange geometry on the surface of this cold distant world".I like to think that Horner would have been as inspired as I have been by this real-life science story, and this piece uses some of the vocabulary of the sci-fi movie soundtrack in a tribute to the memory of a great musician and to the inspirational geeks at NASA who have boldly taken us where no-one has gone before.Note: This work comes with a B4 score. Click here to view a preview PDF file.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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  • £25.00

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £49.95

    Four Cities Symphony - Rodney Newton - -

    This piece was commissioned by the National Contesting Council as the 4th section test piece for the 2008 Regional Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. This symphony (the composer's 12th) has four movements played without a break. The first centres on two aspects of the city of London: its history and pageantry and its role as a busy modern metropolis.The second movement depicts Paris, its street cafes and boulevards and riverside walks, in the form of a romantic waltz. The third movement is constructed around the Gregorian chants of the Lord's Prayer (Pater noster, qui es in caelis) and the Creed (Credo in unum Deum) in an evocation of the city of Rome. After a powerful climax, mysterious tramping footsteps are heard as the ghosts or a Roman legion march through the city by night. The vision fades and the pater noster is heard once again, before the movement is brought to a close with the ancient Ambrosian chant, Christus Vincit, Christus Regnet, Christus Imperat.The final movement is an evocation of the city of Moscow, with its great historic buildings, its turbulent history and its fiery traditional music. At the outset a rather dour folk-like melody is heard which is transformed into a lively Cossack dance.This work is dedicated to Howard Wilson, former principal euphonium of City of Coventry Band who, in 1972, introduced the composer to top section brass band contesting.Rodney Newton, September 2007

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £74.95

    Euphonium Concerto - Karl Jenkins - -

    This work was commissioned by David Childs who gave the first performance with the BBC Concert Orchestra at the Last Night of the Welsh Proms in 2009. 25 minutes in duration, the concerto is in four movements rather than three, loosely following the 'head-heart-feet-whole body' format of (humanist) symphonic design. Jenkins has stated, 'As is my wont, I've endeavoured to make the concerto somewhat quirky and "off the wall".'It is a work overridingly designed to connect with the listener, arguably Jenkins' greatest gift and a task it achieves with considerable aplomb. The individual movements also stand alone equally well when presented as individual solo items. This version, with brass band accompaniment, is a fantastic addition to the repertoire for any serious 21st century euphonium player!

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    The Juggler from Euphonium Concerto - Karl Jenkins - -

    The Juggler is taken from Karl Jenkins' Euphonium Concerto, an extended work given its world premiere by euphonium soloist David Childs and the BBC Concert Orchestra conducted by Owain Arwel Hughes in St. David's Hall, Cardiff during the last night of the 2009 Welsh Proms.The Juggler, would normally form the first movement of the concerto, but it stands alone very well as an individual work for euphonium and band. The music is episodic beginning with with a minimalist texture over which the euphonium "tweets" three short calls before riffing around. It is broken up by a 'circus waltz' exploiting the agility and vituosity of the euphonium in a fun context.On his eagerness to compose the work for David, Karl Jenkins stated, "It's been a privilege to write for such a virtuoso performer. We had been talking about it for some time and happily it all came together in 2009. David is a wonderful musician of the highest quality and it was a joy and, indeed, a challenge, to write a work for both him and an instrument of such beauty and agility."The Juggler for euphonium and brass band recieved its premiere on November 29th 2009 in Swansea's Brangwyn Hall performed by David Childs and the Cory Band conducted by Dr. Robert Childs, and can be heard on Doyen CD262 Moto Perpetuo.Other individual movements and the complete Concerto for Euphonium with brass band accompniament are available from Prima Vista Musikk. Orchestral and wind band versions are available from Boosey and Hawkes.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £69.95

    STARMAKER (Brass Band Set) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    Described by the composer as one of his more ambitious works for brass band, this work is in three movements. Although each movement is capable of standing alone, the composer's own concept is totality with the three movements forming a composite whole. Starmaker presents in music the concept of God's creation of the universe. The frantic and sometimes harsh music of the first movement portrays the chaos from which the immortal and invisible wisdom of God created the order and structure of the heavens, with the stars and planets in their ordered places. An exquisite second movement, based on the benediction 'Now the day is over', brings a calm and ordered peace to the universe, also reminding listeners of the night sky, when God's amazing work is best viewed in all its awesome wonder. The final movement is celebratory in nature, with fragments of melodies like 'Praise to the Lord, the Almighty, the King of creation' appearing in various guises.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    SONGS OF THE MORNING (Brass Band Set) - Eric Ball

    The first two movements of this suite are based on the composer's own songs, a carol 'Welcome, Happy Morning' and 'Begin the Day with God'. The third introduces the tune 'Hark, Hark my Soul' with the line 'Bright day shall dawn and sin's dark night be past' forming the link to the title.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £35.00 £35.00
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    Sussex Carol

    Duration: 3:30 Minutes Percussion: 3 PlayersTimpani, Snare Drum and Tambourine All Rights ReservedProgramme NotesThis carol is also known by its first line “On Christmas Night all Christians Sing”. It was discovered by Cecil Sharp in Gloucestershire and notably by Ralph Vaughan Williams in Sussex. Vaughan Williams heard it sung by Harriet Verrall of Monk’s Gate, near Horsham, Sussex (hence “Sussex Carol”). It is the melody that Harriet Verrall sang that Vaughan Williams transcribed and published in 1919. It is this same version that is still very popular today.Jock McKenzieJock McKenzie studied trumpet at the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester where he was a joint recipient of the college’s concerto prize. Since 1987 Jock has based his musical career in Hampshire, working as a freelance trumpeter, conductor, composer, arranger and brass teacher. Currently Jock holds the position of Professional Leader (Brass) for Hampshire Music Service and is the Director of the Hampshire County Youth Band. It is the mix of all of these musical roles that has led to Jock establishing a reputation as a leading creator of brass music resources, particularly in the field of education and brass ensemble music.