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  • £24.95

    The Liberty Bell - John Philip Sousa - Robert Childs

    The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American Independence. The actual bell was commissioned from the London firm, now known as, Whitechapel Bell Foundry in 1752 and was cast with the inscription:"Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof"The bell was placed originally in the steeple of Independence Hall in Pennsylvania and historically cracked the first time it was rung.Interest in the bell heightened across America in 1847 when it was claimed the bell was rung on the 4th July 1776 upon hearing the Second Continental Congress's vote for Independence. Despite the fact that this is undocumented and it is highly unlikely that the bell was actually struck on this date as it was in storage, the story was widely accepted and the bell was exhibited for many years at various expositions and patriotic gatherings across the United States.John Philip Sousa originally composed the march as part of an operetta score called, "The Devils Deputy" which, due to a lack of financing, was never completed. Sousa's manager George Hinton however, encouraged him to publish some of the music from the operetta as concert items, including the title-less march. While Sousa and his manager were attending the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, they watched a patriotic spectacle called "America" where the Liberty Bell was presented to the audience. Sousa's manager suggested that this would be a suitable title for Sousa's new march, to which Sousa agreed.This classic American march has been superbly arranged here for brass band by Dr. Robert Childs.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £39.00

    King Cotton (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sousa, John Philip - Wilkinson, Keith M.

    This march was written in 1895 when the Sousa Band played for three weeks at the Cotton States And International Exposition. This was a time when in southern USA cotton production was vitally important - the phrase Cotton is King was appropriate and widely used.This arrangement was prepared for the 2010 Summer concerts of Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Dr Keith M Wilkinson. The staging directions for back-row cornets in the last section will enhance the performance.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £59.95

    Judd: Caelum Corona - Stephen Bulla

    Stephen Bulla's ‘Caelum Corona' (‘Crown of Heaven') portrays, in sound, a Christian's walk in faith, intended metaphorically via a musical narrative reminiscent of the early church pilgrims, their struggles and triumphs. The composer initially evokes the atmosphere of Rome at the time of St. Paul and other martyrs, thus the Latin title. Bulla marks his imaginative tone poem with dark, brooding music in the first two of three parts, in each of which he has embedded an appropriate hymn or song reference as thematic material. The first of these sounds in a minor key following a symphonic exposition made up primarily of fanfare-like motives, the music at times quite harsh and abrasive. The song is Paul's statement of exuberant faith (2 Timothy 1:12) in the midst of prison and persecution: ‘For I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I've committed unto him against that day.' More challenging, aggressive music returns until a further point of reflection on Christ's sacrifice is reached. The music graphically evokes the barren landscape of Golgatha, the horror of the crucifixion, including stark wind sounds, a loss of stability via eerie, dissonant chord clusters, and even the nails being driven into Christ's body. The Baritones and then Flugel Horn softly play ‘He died of a broken heart.' Yet the Christian life, despite its perils - both at the time of Paul and now - is a victorious life, and the composer resolves the tensions of the work in a scintillating finale, a brilliant setting of the old song about spiritual warfare and the ultimate triumph of Christ the King: ‘Victory for me!' (T.B. 841). The chorus of that tune proclaims: ‘No retreating, hell defeating, shoulder to shoulder we stand; God look down, with glory crown our conq'ring band.' That crowning is the same one sought and claimed by St. Paul (2 Timothy 4:8): ‘Now there is in store for me a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous judge, will award me on that day, but also to all who have longed for his appearing.' Believers look forward to participating in the final coronation of their Saviour - King of Kings and Lord of Lords - while humbly desiring their own ‘crown of heaven.'

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £39.00

    King Cotton (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sousa, John PhilipArranger:

    This march was written in 1895 when the Sousa Band played for three weeks at the Cotton States And International Exposition. This was a time when in southern USA cotton production was vitally important - the phrase Cotton is King was appropriate and widely used.This arrangement was prepared for the 2010 Summer concerts of Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Dr Keith M Wilkinson. The staging directions for back-row cornets in the last section will enhance the performance.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £9.95

    Second Quartet (Brass Quartet - Score and Parts) - Gregson, EdwardCode:

    My second Brass Quartet was written in 1968, immediately after I finished my studies at the Royal Academy of Music, and was in response to a request from my then publisher, R Smith & Co, to write some chamber music for brass band instruments. My Brass Quartet No 1 (also written in 1968) was scored for the usual combination of two cornets, horn and euphonium, but the second is scored for two horns, baritone, and tuba, giving the music a somewhat mellower sound world than the First Quartet. It is also a miniature in form in that it barely lasts six minutes. The music is in three movements: Prelude, Scherzo and Postlude. The outer movements are slow and thoughtful, while the middle Scherzo is rather astringent in character, with virtuoso demands made on the players. The Prelude begins with a duet for the two horns, answered by baritone and tuba, the material being rather rhetorical in style and although the Postlude begins in a similar fashion it also develops material from the Scherzo (slowed down of course) in the manner of a fugal exposition. The music ends with a series of quiet chords. - Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days