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  • £83.00

    Calling Cornwall - Goff Richards

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £49.20

    CALLING CORNWALL (Brass Band) - Richards, Goff

    Medium

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £22.00

    Cornwall (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    -

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £22.00

    Cornwall - Floyd, WE

    Includes a full band set (no score)

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £49.20

    Calling Cornwall - Goff Richards

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £19.50

    Jocular Geordie - Various - David White

    Every part of the UK, from Cornwall to the outer tips of Scotland has its own local and traditional folk tunes. This playful medley of traditional tunes has come straight from the North East, including popular tunes such as "Cushie Butterfield", "Geordy, Haud the Bairn" and "Keep your Feet Still, Geordie". This toe-tapping piece is a must for all bands, whether performing in a concert hall or a village gala, your audiences can be singing and swaying.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £69.95

    Corineus - Christopher Bond

    Corineus, in medieval British legend, was a prodigious warrior, a fighter of giants, and the eponymous founder of Cornwall. The first of the legendary rulers of Cornwall, he is described as a character of strength and power. It is on the medieval ruler that this new work, Corineus, is based, presented in three contrasting sections.The work opens with heraldic fanfares and a sense of jubilance before presenting musical material which changes and develops organically, portraying the journey taken by Corineus, Brutus, and the Trojans from modern-day mainland Europe to Britain.The central section of the work is slower, creating a feeling of longing. Brutus' son, Locrinus, had agreed to marry Corineus' daughter, Gwendolen, but instead fell in love with a German princess. In writing this part of the work, the composer portrays the longing of Gwendolen for her husband, knowing he is in love with somebody else.After Corineus died, Locrinus divorced Gwendolen, who responded by raising an army in Cornwall and making war against her ex-husband.Locrinus was killed in battle, and legend suggests that Gwendolen threw Locrinus' lover into the River Severn. This dramatic battle provides the inspiration for the final part of the work.In writing this work, the composer hopes to flare the imagination of young brass players around the country, in an engaging new take on a firm fixture in British folklore.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £10.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Tintagel.mp3The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Lyonesse.mp3The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Badon-Hill.mp3

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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  • £24.95

    Wheal Breage - Terry Reed

    The Cornish word Wheal strictly means "a place of work" but it is usually thought of as meaning a mine, because all Cornish mine names were prefixed by the word Wheal. The composer is the MD of Breage & District Silver Band and this march is dedicated to both his band, based in the village of Breage, Cornwall, and to the great Cornish mining heritage. Breage Parish had a number of successful tin and copper ore mines, some of which started in the 16th and 17th centuries and lasted until the end of the 19th century. Cornish Brass Bands and Male Voice Choirs were formed by the miners and have had a long association with the mining communities around Cornwall.Wheal Breage starts off in a jolly way to reflect the mining youth's carefree life outside of mining. At Section C, the march modulates to a minor key, reflecting the hard, industrious nature of mining; you can almost hear the Beam Engine Houses pumping the water out of the mines. At Section D, there is a dramatic time signature change from 6/8 to 4/4, followed in the Trio at Section E, by an original melody which was written to reflect and remember the men (and children) who tragically lost their lives in many mining accidents that occurred over a number of centuries. Section F is a joyful coda, reflecting the past Cornish Miners' Gala Parades which were headed by a Cornish Brass Band.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £69.99

    The Mermaid of Zennor - Philip Harper

    Commissioned by the Cornwall Youth Brass Band to mark its 60th Anniversary, with funds bequethed by Dennis Arbon This piece is inspired by an old Cornish folk-tale set in the village of Zennor on the coast of Cornwall, the most South-Westerly county of England. The music is in three sections: l. The Sea and Seafaring ll. At the Church ill. Return to the Waves

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days