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  • £73.00

    A Spanish Christmas Carol - Patrick Millstone

    Rondeau of the Shepherds," so ran the official title of the famous Dutch Christmas carol 'Midden in de winternacht'. In 1948 wrote Dutch poet and writer Harry Prenen this text. The melody is known by the 17th/18th- century organ composers of suites Daquin, Balbastre and Dandrieu. "Rondeau of the Shepherds" was subtitled "Catalan Christmas Carol". The song itself is because its origins in a Spanish (Catalan probably) Christmas song from the late Middle Ages, "El Desembre congelat. The motives of this song (shepherds, flutes, drums) demonstrate knowledge of the Bible and give a picture of the late medieval Christmas experience. . Perfect as an uptempo intermezzo in a church service.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £44.00

    Christmas Carillion - James Curnow

    This sparkling arrangement of Ding Dong Merrily On High is full of the festive sounds of bells that ring from church steeples, street corners, and stores throughout the holiday season! It's a vibrant work that captures the jubilant and triumphant sounds of Christmas! Wonderful!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £24.95

    Silent Night - Franz Gruber - Darius Battiwalla

    In 1816, a Roman Catholic priest called Josef Mohr composed a short six-stanza poem for his Christmas service which he entitled Stille Nacht. On Christmas Eve in 1818 the church organ at St Nicholas Church, Oberndorf had broken down and he happened to show his organist and choirmaster Franz Gruber the poem he had written, wondering if it could be set to music which would not require the organ.Gruber spent that afternoon composing, what would become the most loved Christmas carol of all time. It was first performed that very Christmas Eve, with the church choir and Gruber accompanying them on guitar.Although Gruber's original melody has altered little since 1818, it was originally performed as a sprightly 6/8 dance. Over the years the melody has been slowed down and we now recognise it most commonly as a gentle, meditative lullaby.The song's lyrics have been translated into around 140 different languages and it has been used extensively, in countless guises all over the world.Perhaps its most poignant use however was during the First World War Christmas Truce in 1914, where it was sung simultaneously by French, English and German troops stationed on the front line, being the only carol they all new.This new arrangement for brass band yet again breathes new life into this timeless classic. Lush harmonies and its reflective texture will make this a welcome addition to any festive program.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £94.00

    Nordic Moods - Tom Brevik

    The composer:1st movement: Reflections by the Fjord.Overlooking one of the mighty fjords of Norway, my mind and thoughts are with an old religious Norwegian folk-tune, with words by the famous parson Peter Dass.The majestic fanfare-like opening reflects the power of God our Father, the choral itself heard for the first time on flugelhorn. The choral is repeated a few times, separated only by some short variations. The movement ends in thriumph, with fanfares and the choral brought together.2nd movement: Reflections in the Old Church.In this movement my associations of a summer day, finding myself alone in an old deserted stone church. From the old walls I hear folk songs, perhaps like the ones sung in the church by poor fishermen and farmers in days gone by. Suddenly the light from the sun breakes through the small circular window above the altar, and a lovely melody is heard, before the original figures take us to the end of the movement.3rd movement: Festive Reflections.Any festive occasion can be reflected in this movement. from the bonfire at midsummer-night to the children celebrating the return of the sun in the northern part of Norway. from the traditional sleigh-riding at Christmas to the Celebrations of the National Day on the 17th of May each year.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £48.00

    Mary Did You Know

    Upon being asked to write a Christmas musical for his church, Mark Lowry penned a series of monologues based on Christmas Songs including a conversation with Mary about the birth and life of her Son, Jesus. Lowry worked on the lyrics for years until he approached southern gospel singer-songwriter and harmonica player, Buddy Greene. Greene agreed to pen music for his words, completing the instrumentation within a few days. The result is this new-age Christmas classic: 'Mary Did You Know".

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £53.00

    Dance of the Shepherds - Patrick Millstone

    Patrick Millstone based his Dance of the Shepherds on the song Quem pastores laudavere by Michael Praetorius.After an upbeat flashy introduction, you can hear this wonderful Christmas song. A good choice for a Christmas concert or church service!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £44.00

    Introitus - Traditional - Jacob de Haan

    The Latin word "Introitus" means 'entry'. Originally, this was a psalm sung to accompany the entrance of a bishop, priest or celebrant into the church. Later it was incorporated into the mass with alternating sung and spoken text, reflecting the mood of the liturgy. Jacob de Haan's Introitus, in which he has arranged the hymns Puer natus est nobis and Lobt Gott, Ihr Christen alle gleich, is a wonderful introduction to the Christmas season and can be performed with any instrumental combination with mixed choir and organ ad libitum.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
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    The Crown of Roses - Tchaikovsky - Len Jenkins

    Tchaikovsky wrote this in his 'Songs for Young People' in Moscow in 1883 to words by Pletchtcheev. The story it tells is about Jesus Christ when he was a young child, having a small wild garden in which roses grew. Passing children saw the roses and plucking them mockingly asked if he wove rose garlands in his hair. Christ says to take the roses, but to leave the thorns. Instead, they make a crown of these and forced it onto his head so that it bleeds, symbolic of what was going to happen later in his lifetime. The melody contains all the passion that we associate with Russian church music and is equally suitable for a contemplative Christmas or Passiontide. This arrangement is faithful to the four verses of the original lyrics, but with an optional ending half-way if preferred.