Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 19 matches for your search. Order by

Results

  • £61.99
  • £67.20

    The Chamber - Lenny Kravitz

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days
  • £44.50

    Magnificat - John Rutter - Gavin Somerset

    John Rutter's Magnificat (Magnificat anima mea), first performed in 1990, opens with bold fanfares and syncopation which captures the listeners attention from the very first note. The work was originally composed for chamber orchestra and SATB choir. The SATB parts are also included in the score with this publication allowing bands if they wish, to perform with work alongside a full choir. Transcribed directly from the composers original score, Rutter's music is full of strong melodic lines and gorgeous harmonies. Full of hair raising moments, it lends itself perfectly to Brass Bands and this opening movement is a must have for bands wanting to add something new and challenging to their classical repertoire.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

     PDF View Music

  • £45.00

    Bathgate Hills Trilogy - Andrew Duncan

    Composed by Andrew Duncan and written for the West Lothian Schools Band, A Bathgate Hills Trilogy is in three movements, each one dedicated to and representing a different hill.Comments from the composer:Movement 1 - Dechmont LawThe first movement describes the peculiar events which took place in November 1979 when a forestry worker, Bob Taylor, had a close encounter with an alien spacecraft in Dechmont Woods at the bottom of Dechmont Hill. Bob Taylor's account from the time describes a large sphere like object about twenty feet across which pulled him by the legs towards it, caustic smoke then caused him to pass out. He awoke a short time later in the same spot but the spaceship had gone leaving behind marks in the soil. His story caused a great deal of media interest and a great deal of excitement in the local community.Movement 2 - The Knock HillThe Term 'Knock' is Scottish Gaelic for 'hill' and the Knock Hill is the highest peak in the Bathgate Hills being 305 metres above Sea Level. On a clear day the Knock hill has excellent views of the Bass Rock to the East and the distant hills of Arran to the West as well as of the whole of West Lothian and across the Firth of Forth to Fife and beyond to the North.The second movement is a description of a leisurely walk to the summit of this hill and the enjoyment of a pleasant summer's day spent walking and taking in the beautiful panoramic views. However, as is the case with the Scottish Summer, a change in the weather finds a clear blue sky being replaced with dark rain clouds. The changed weather brings a sudden brief but unwelcome cold downpour of rain, drenching anyone out walking! Finally, the clouds pass and the more pleasant summer weather returns.Movement 3 - Cairnpapple HillCairnpapple Hill is a near neighbour of the Knock Hill. It is almost as high but interest in Cairnpapple Hill lies in the outstanding archaeological monument near the summit, an Iron Age burial chamber. The chamber dates back to 25 years BC and was built by a mysterious people known as the Beaker People (so called because they left behind a number of large earthenware beakers). The mysteries of Cairnpapple Hill have always been a source of fascination for me ever since first visiting the hill as a school child.The third movement describes the lives of the Beaker People. The landscape they would have looked out on would have been mostly dense forest which would have contained many perils including dangerous wolves and bears. Life was harsh and short for the Beaker People and they would always have been close to danger and to death. The average life expectancy for the Beaker People was only 31 years of age. The summit of the hill would have been clear of forest and would have afforded the Beaker People some protection as they could see all around the near countryside enabling them to keep a watchful lookout for their enemies - both animal and human!

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £35.00

    Oubliette - Lucy Pankhurst

    Lucy Pankhurst has created a highly immersive solo for Tuba/Eb Bass with brass band accompaniment, aiming and succeeding in showing the lyrical and technical diversity of the tuba, demanding virtuoso brilliance and clarity in performance.Dedicated to tuba player Edd Leech, Oubliette raises the bar for tuba repertoire.Set includes score, brass band parts and solo parts for Eb Bass (TC) and Tuba (BC). Solo with piano accompaniment available separately.Programme notes from the composer, Lucy Pankhurst:From the French word oublier, meaning 'to forget', an oubliette was a form of dungeon used in the 14th century. A small, windowless room where someone is locked away to be forgotten and left to go mad.I initially chose this title for the piece as the Tuba is often forgotten as a solo instrument, when its versatility in performance should be celebrated. Oubliette showsThe work begins with desolate and sparse accompaniment with lamenting solo lines. The soloist has already been cast into the oubliette at this point and is beginning to wake from a somnolent state. Reality is blurred through the darkness of the chamber - the only entrance is a hatch in the ceiling, far out of reach.Memories are confused by countless hours of solitude - hallucinations and paranoia tainting reality. Gradually, the soloist remembers images from the past and gains confidence and strength. Long forgotten by the captors, or presumed dead in the chamber, the entrance hatch suddenly opens to allow another prisoner inside. The soloist seizes the opportunity for escape and a short battle ensues. Sword and fist fighting, perilous leaps over the entrances to more dungeons and fierce battle cries are futile, as the soloist suddenly realises they are alone in the oubliette once more and the skirmish was nothing but another dream.The piece concludes with unaccompanied soloist in the low register, sinking deeper into the shadows of the windowless prison; are they accepting their fate, or merely lying in wait for another chance of escape, if one will ever come . . .

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £44.00

    Songs for B.L. (Score only) - Elgar Howarth

    Songs for B.L. was commissioned by BBC North for the 1995 BBC Festival of Brass and first performed by the Eikanger/Bjorsvik Musiklag Band in February that year. It was selected as the championship section test-piece for the 1995 National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. The piece is in seven sections: Romanza; First Scherzo; Ballad; March; Second Scherzo; Romanza reprise; Coda. It is romantic but charged with highly chromatic harmony, and makes much use of chamber music textures. The work is dedicated to the composer's wife, Mary. 'The meaning of the title,' says the composer, 'is a secret, and will remain so'.

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £56.00

    Songs for B.L. (Parts only) - Elgar Howarth

    Songs for B.L. was commissioned by BBC North for the 1995 BBC Festival of Brass and first performed by the Eikanger/Bjorsvik Musiklag Band in February that year. It was selected as the championship section test-piece for the 1995 National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. The piece is in seven sections: Romanza; First Scherzo; Ballad; March; Second Scherzo; Romanza reprise; Coda. It is romantic but charged with highly chromatic harmony, and makes much use of chamber music textures. The work is dedicated to the composer's wife, Mary. 'The meaning of the title,' says the composer, 'is a secret, and will remain so'.

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £74.95

    Aspects of Adiemus (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    Aspects of Adiemus is a collection from one of the world's most popular composers, Karl Jenkins. Adiemus, literally translated, means 'we will draw near' and represents a musical language which can be heard on five award winning albums from the composer.Since Adiemus has risen in popularity around the world, it has become a growing entity meaning many different things to many different people. Vocally, the spread of influence grows wider all the time, taking in Arabic and African sounds as well as "Celtic" and ecclesiastical ones. The percussion too has expanded using Indian, Middle Eastern, Japanese, Chinese and even Australian instrumentation.The evolving nature of Adiemus has meant that it has been difficult to categorise. New age, classical crossover, world music, even pop. Karl sees this as a good sign: "To me, Adiemus transcends labels. The fact that it reaches people of different backgrounds, faiths and cultures gives it a universal appeal which is special. The compositions can be spiritual, religious, meditative - it's open to 'move' people in any away they choose to experience."Ironically, the Adiemus project 'got off the ground' initially due to a television commercial for an airline. Karl Jenkins explains, "I'd been toying with a new idea, completely separate to my work in advertising, but at this time, Jenkins Ratledge were commissioned to come up with the music for an airline commercial. We presented the client with a demonstration tape of one of my completed compositions and they loved it."That composition became known as Adiemus. The music for the airline commercial was aired and immediately drew interest from the public. Karl: "It's ironic that a piece of music not originally intended for a TV commercial should end up on a TV commercial, and that this music became the springboard for the success of the Adiemus project."Expertly arranged by Peter Graham, Aspects of Adiemus features the eponymous 'Adiemus', an uplifting and instantly recognisable opener. 'Chorale - Za Ma Ba' and 'Chorale - Vocalise' are songs of sanctuary, the latter featuring a chamber group from within the band. The vibrant 'Song of the Spirit' is a cornet feature, and the finale, 'Song of the Plains' combines intense rhythmic energy with tribal harmonies. Duration is variable depending on movement selection and optional cuts.Duration: 20.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £9.95

    Second Quartet (Brass Quartet - Score and Parts)

    My second Brass Quartet was written in 1968, immediately after I finished my studies at the Royal Academy of Music, and was in response to a request from my then publisher, R Smith & Co, to write some chamber music for brass band instruments. My Brass Quartet No 1 (also written in 1968) was scored for the usual combination of two cornets, horn and euphonium, but the second is scored for two horns, baritone, and tuba, giving the music a somewhat mellower sound world than the First Quartet. It is also a miniature in form in that it barely lasts six minutes. The music is in three movements: Prelude, Scherzo and Postlude. The outer movements are slow and thoughtful, while the middle Scherzo is rather astringent in character, with virtuoso demands made on the players. The Prelude begins with a duet for the two horns, answered by baritone and tuba, the material being rather rhetorical in style and although the Postlude begins in a similar fashion it also develops material from the Scherzo (slowed down of course) in the manner of a fugal exposition. The music ends with a series of quiet chords. - Edward Gregson

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £9.95

    First Quartet (Brass Quartet - Score and Parts)

    My first Brass Quartet was written in 1968, immediately after I finished my studies at the Royal Academy of Music, and was in response to a request from my then publisher, R Smith & Co, to write some chamber music for brass band instruments. It is scored for two cornets, horn and euphonium. In the same year I also wrote another quartet (No. 2) which is scored for the more unusual combination of two horns, baritone, and tuba. The First Quartet is really a miniature in terms of length, lasting less than six minutes. However, it packs a lot of punch in its two connected movements, a Prelude and a Capriccio. The Prelude is lyrical in style and opens with a rising figure (covering a major seventh) on euphonium answered by muted cornets. These ideas form the material for the movement which is arch shape in structure. The opening returns, immediately followed by a transition passage which leads directly into the turbulent Capriccio. This is rather Bartokian in style (I was very influenced by Bartok in my student days and had closely studied his six string quartets), in the manner of a Hungarian dance in 5/8 time. The constantly changing metric patterns give the music a rather disruptive quality, but also an opportunity for the players to show their virtuoso abilities. - Edward Gregson

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days