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  • £34.95

    Song of the Night Sky - Christopher Bond

    For Cornet in B-flat & Brass Band, Written for & Commissioned by Tom Hutchinson & Cory BandOrpheus is known as the most talented music player of the ancient times. It is said that god Apollo was his father, from whom took his extreme talent in music, and the Muse Calliope was his mother. Tragedy struck when his wife, Eurydice stepped on a viper which in turn bit her, injecting its fatal venom. Nothing could stop his cries of anguish and sheer pain and sorrow upon realizing his beautiful Eurydice was dead. Orpheus decided to go into the Underworld to get his wife back. Apollo, his father, would talk to Hades, the god of the Underworld to accept him and hear his plea. And so Orpheus set off into the Underworld and was warned that for no reason must he look back while his wife was still in the dark, for that would undo everything he hoped for. As Orpheus was reaching the exit of the Underworld, he could hear the footfalls of his wife approaching him. As his was approaching the exit, his heart was beating faster and faster. The moment he stepped on the world of the living, he turned his head to hug his wife. Unfortunately, he got only a glimpse of Eurydice before she was once again drawn back into the underworld. When Orpheus turned his head, Eurydice was still in the dark, she hadn't seen the sun and, was drowned back to the dark world of the dead. Waves of anguish and despair swept over him and shuddering with grief he approached the Underworld again but this time, he was denied entry, the gates were standing shut and god Hermes, sent by Zeus, wouldn't let him in. His songs were no more joyful but extremely sad. His only comfort was to lay on a huge rock and feel the caress of the breeze, his only vision were the open skies. Song of the Night Sky was recorded by Tom Hutchinson and the Cory Band in June 2015, featuring on his debut solo album.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £76.00

    The Promised Land - Max Stannard

    The Promised Land - Max Stannard - 5'30'' - BVT102 The Promised Land was written in response to a request by Jonathan Parton to create a piece for Lancaster University Brass Band which would allow the band to show off a range of soloists. The piece was recorded by County Brass a Lancaster. There are solos for Flugel Horn, Tenor Horn, Trombone, Euphonium, E flat Bass and Solo Cornet. The piece then builds to a rousing conclusion involving the full band. The melody which inspired this piece is an American folk song called, I'm Bound for the Promised Land.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £133.60

    Myte - Myth - Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    Commissioned by Radoy Brass for their 20 years anniversary. This version was first performed by Manger Skulemusikklag in 2005. The Work is devided into Five Scenes: 1. Sverdet (The Sword) 3:45 2. Advarsel - fra en vis mann (Warning - from a Wise Man) 2:30 3. Dragen (The Dragon) 3:00 4. Advarsel II - fra syngende fugler (Warning II - from singing birds) 1:35 5. Gull - forbannelsen (Gold - The Curse) 2:50 Total durata 13:30 This work is based on five scenes from the tale about "Sigurd Favnesbane" (Sigurd the dragonslayer). Moods and atmospheres in the piece represent my way of retelling the old myth. 1. The Sword The dwarf blacksmith Regin is hammering and sharpening the edges of the magical sword Gram. After three attempts the sword is finally sharp enough to kill a dragon. 2. Warning - from a Wise man Richard Wagners opera Sigfried is based on the same story. In the opera the hero get warned by a wise man. He tells the secret of how to survive an attack of the dragon by hiding in a hole in the pathway and then kill the dragon with the sword as the dragon passes on its way to the river to drink water. 3. Dragon The Dragon (Favne) guards a fantastic treasure, but he is also the brother of the blacksmith Regin. Favne get killed and his blood flows slowly while he laments (trombone/bass trombone). 4. Warning II - from singing birds While frying the heart, Sigurd burns his thumb and put it into his mouth to cool it down. Then he swallow a drop of fresh magic dragon blood which transfers the ability to understand the birdlanguage. The birds sing warnings to Sigurd telling him that Regin will betray him and later kill him. Sigurd then kills Regin instead. 5. Gold - the Curse Sigurd takes the gold treasure and escapes on the horseback of Grane. But his robbery of the gold lead him into trouble: The gold is banned and a curse will hit everyone who takes it... Myth is a programmatic work where the story is quite clearly illustrated throughout the piece: In the first movement you can hear the blacksmith working with hammer on ambolt while the heat is intense from the glows. The dwarf has got his own theme i lower brass (bar 4-5). The hero Sigurd has his own identifying chord (2 bars before F). The chord is also a symbol of the sword. In the second movement the warning from the wise man is expressed in the lyric bass line. The airblow in instruments illustrate the dragon Favne on his way out of his cave, and later the blood flows slowly. The dragon takes his last deep breath after a painful duet in trombones. The birds sing their motifs (lightly, but not cheerful though), until Sigurd cuts the head off Regin and it hits the ground.The last movement describes the atmosphere and state of mind as the curse infects the obsessed thief.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days

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  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Peter Meechan Music

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Peter Meechan Music

    The Pohutukawa Stands - Peter Meechan

    The earthquake that hit Christchurch in February 2011 took the lives of 181 people. Being asked to write this work in their memory was an honour, but I didn't want it to simply be performed as a memorial. I wanted to compose a work that conveyed the sadness and grief for those lost - a work of remembrance - but also a piece of music that represented peace, hope and strength.The title and dedication come direct from the commissioners of the work, Woolston Brass Band. The Pohutukawa Trees stay standing and secure, defiant of the earthquake, in Christchurch's 'Garden City', and the Pohutukawa tree also has special significance beyond their physical appearance.According to Maori mythology, the spirits of the dead travel to Cape Reinga on their journey to the afterlife to leap off the headland and climb the roots of the 800 year old Pohutukawa tree and descend to the underworld to return to their traditional homeland of Hawaiiki-a-nui, using the Te Ara Wairua, the ‘Spirits’ pathway’.The Pohutukawa Stands is dedicated to the lives lost in the Christchurch earthquake.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Aldebaran - Maurice Forslund - Maurice Forslund

    We are pleased to offer this new piece from our colleague, Maurice Forslund, in Sweden. "Aldebaran" is a traditional-style brass band march, named after one of the brightest and largest stars in the Northern sky. (The star is a red giant over 40 times the size of our Sun). The music starts off in a sombre minor key that turns progressively brighter step by step. This sequence is arrested by a brief section featuring a setting of the hymn tune 'Bangor' which dramatically puts the march firmly back into the minor key before setting it up for progression to the finale. This piece is graded in the range 'easy' to 'intermediate' and is well within the capabilities of most bands.

  • £38.00

    Trittico (Score only) - James Curnow

    Trittico was commissioned by the Swiss Brass Band Association for their national championships in 1988. A trittico is a tripych or group of three paintings or musical compositions based on a common theme and presented or performed together. The present work is a set of three extended variations on the American shaped-note hymn Consolation. The work opens in grand style with motives based on intervals of the hymn tune. The opening motif, and smaller fragments of it reappear throughout the piece and serve as an underlying element alongside the theme itself. The first variation is essentially a scherzo which echoes the minor mood of the theme. The hemiolic opposition of compound and duple time is used to good effect and, again, the main motif is never far away. This is music with energy and forward movement. The second variation gives the soloists a chance to shine. The mood is tranquil, yet there is always some activity and the musical material pre-echoes the third variation. The third variation is another scherzo-like section, the main theme accompanied by a rhythmic ostinato. Toward the conclusion there is a short aeleatoric passage - a variation within a variation allowing half the band to make their own variaitions in a cachophony of sound. An energetic coda draws together several elements to round off a work brim full of drive, energy, and self-propelled enthusiasm. Duration: 13:30

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days