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  • £34.95

    The Fire & the Phoenix - Christopher Bond

    For Trombone & Brass Band, Written for & Commissioned by Brett BakeThe Fire & the Phoenix (2015) was commissioned by Brett Baker in early 2015 as the opening track to his solo CD 'Myths & Legends'. Whilst structurally a single-movement work, it is presented so that it can link directly into the next work on the CD, adding to a continuous theme comprising a number of pieces from a number of composers.Opening with huge strident chords in the full band, the representation of the phoenix is instantly reflected; bold, powerful and a bird of great intensity. This makes way for a more mystical section marked 'distant' which reflect the beauty of the Phoenix and it's mythical nature where the trombone soars up into its higher register with a sweeping melody. Soon after, the music takes a sharp turn, becoming dramatic and instantly moving away from the mystical mood created previously. Here, we imagine the Phoenix catching fire, burning intensely with huge flames as it gradually turns into ash. We reach a tonic pedal point in the music, over which chord progressions subtly weave in and out of the texture. Here, we imagine the Phoenix rising from the ashes, with the dynamics gradually increasing to reflect this, slowly taking shape as it is born again. A return to earlier material follows, this time manipulated to reflect the Phoenix in its new form - the same bird; the same animal; but at the same time different. A beautiful chorale-like passage is heard before the music transports us back into a magical land, where delicate rhythmic ideas are juxtaposed against bolder lower chords; both ideas together transporting the listener forward into the next piece.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £11.95

    On the Movieset - John Emerson Blackstone

    Glitter and glamour, good-looking people, a lot of Bling Bling and fast cars - images like these will cross our minds when we think of the movie world. However, reality proves to be different : as a rule, a tremendous amount of work will have been done on the set before a film is ready to be shown on the big screen. A visit to an actual movie set inspired John Emerson Blackstone to write a composition bearing the same name. He had both seen a number of characteristic attributes and heard the typical phrases used in film making, and he incorporated them into 'On the Movie Set' . In the first part, 'The Clapboard', a 'director's assistant' is supposed to shout "Quiet on the set'" and "Action!", as is done before a real scene is shot. Subsequently, in order to create the right atmosphere, the clacking of a 'Clapboard' should be heard. During a romantic scene we should be transported to another world by means of sweet sounds in the background, so romantic music is of course heard in the next part, 'Love Scene'. At the end of a long working day 'It's a wrap' is called on the set to inform everyone that the filming on that day is completed. Now there is only one more thing left to dream of : an Oscar..... Perf. Note: The use of the right props will add to the performance and appreciation of 'On the Movie Set'. A red carpet and a glamorous reception should give your audience the feeling they are attending a real 'opening night'!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.99 £34.99
    Buy from Marcato Brass

    Euphoria | Chris Ellis

    Opening with a slow minor-key melody, the theme develops tonally before the tom-toms herald a faster, more rhythmic section, developing into a toe-tapping jig-like tune, finally slowing back into the almost meditative motif mirroring the original passage. An original style to add variety to your band concerts. The Minor key adagio opening bars of this number has an uplifting 'choral like' orchestration with an almost 'what's coming next' undertone, with Euphoniums leading the way. The pace and feel changes totally at the Allegro with the tom toms taking the tempo up with a toe tapping jig like rhythm and a move to the Major Key. A clever contrast in the next section has the rhythmic triplet pattern played against a quaver melody, before full band join in with the dance quality of this section. The end section of Euphoria returns to the adagio with an uplifting and real sense of reaching a goal.Skill Level: Intermediate

  • £75.00

    Apollo 11

    A Major Original work from Drew Fennell. Drew comments on this work " I intend for "Apollo 11" apart from programmatic depictions of NASA's launch, three day jorney and historic moon landing, to be a celebration of the American spirit. The bold statement by President John F.Kennedy in a message to congress in May of 1961 set forth the goal: "...before the decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth" From this grand vision sprang one of the most audacious plans ever concieved by humankind. Having not yet even achieved earth orbit, the idea of astronauts travelling over two hundred thousdand miles through very inhospitable space to the Moon, landing and walking on its surface would seem impossible. And yet, through tremendous vision, creativity, ingenuity and downright courage, it became a reality in just over eight years. The piece begins with a musical statement depicting Kennedy's words and response by politicians, scientists and all Americans to support the noble quest. After years of engineering and test missions, on July 16 1969 we witness the countdown and the violent and fiery launch of the Saturn V rocket which would carry the astronauts into space. Next is depicted the experience of the peaceful weightlessness of space as the brave astronauts hurtle toward the Moon. Concluding the work, on July 20 1969, America and the world celebrate one of the greatest triumphs in the history of mankind as Neil Armstrong descends the ladder from the Lunar Module to the Moons dusty surface Duration approx 11 minutes Drew R Fennell - April 14 2008

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £102.00

    Rhapsody in Black - Andi Cook

    Rhapsody in Black - Andi Cook - 10'40'' - BVT126 The primary inspiration for this work comes from the composer’s first encounter with the genre of Symphonic Metal - the opening track of the 2004 Nightwish album 'Once', entitled Dark chest of Wonders. The combination of full orchestra, operatically trained female vocals and the raw power of a Scandinavian metal band was a potent mix that instantly had me hooked.That same dark and powerful sound is one that a brass band can generate, and I've tried to capture that in this composition. Heavy Rock/Metal as a genre is arguably fifty years old now, but symphonic metal is a newer concept, and I feel possibly the one that can bridge the gap between two musical styles very dear to me.Composer Gilbert Vinter had explored through music the connotations that different colours held for him, and his movement Purple from 'Spectrum' gave me an idea for the structure of ‘Rhapsody in Black’. Andi Cook explored the different connotations of one colour within his own life, black being an easy choice due to the personal dichotomy of the black leather jacket he wore to the rock club on Friday night and the black suit jacket and tie he wore to the concert hall the next day.To avoid repetition the word 'black' is omitted from the five movement titles, each of which is a different episode. '...as Thunder' is a furious argument between two people - the top and bottom of the band - set against the backdrop of a storm, with lightning flashing outside while barbs, insults, sarcasm, tears and even violence is traded inside. Following that '...Satin and Pearls' is an old black-and-white movie with a wistful character to it as if we're looking back a screen icon with fondness long after their career or even their life has ended. '...as the Raven's Wing.' is deliberately gothic and funereal, hinting at Edgar Allen Poe's similarly named poem, with undertones of death and afterlife. The shift into F/C Minor (band pitch) represents the descent - alive - into the grave that Poe had a paranoid fear of his entire life. Family and friends standing around grieving, oblivious as we're lowered into the earth despite frantic attempts to make ourselves heard. '...and Chrome' is an unashamed motorcycle reference with all its born-to-be-wild, open air, high speed and freedom overtones. In a deliberate contrast to what went before it continues several of the same motifs though this time in the major key. Lastly, we reprise the second movement with '...as the Night Sky' which is simply the feeling of walking home under the summer stars, with someone important - who that is, is left to the listener, but a walk under the stars is always that bit special.There's an old saying that very few things are black and white. I hope this work will prove that even black alone isn't quite as simple as it's often made out....‘Rhapsody in Black’ is dedicated to the composer’s friend and mentor John Roberts, who shares his love of both brass and rock.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £53.00

    Theme from "Star Trek(R)" - Alexander Courage - Thomas Doss

    Who doesn't know the famous introduction "To boldly go where no man has gone before" at the beginning of each Star Trek sequel? Many generations grew up with Star Trek - one of the most iconic Sci-Fi series ever written. The original theme is as iconic as the opening line. A great warm up for the next Star Trek series in 2017, arranged by Thomas Doss.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £58.70

    Last Christmas - George Michael - Haakon Esplo

    Who does not know the big hit Last Christmas from the pop group Wham!The duo sold 25 million albums between 1982 until they dissolved in 1986.The front figure, vocalist George Michael and guitarist/singer Andrew Ridgeley is also known for hits such as Club Tropicana and Wake Me Up Before You Go-Go which was their first song to reache the top on both the UK and US hitlists.Last Christmas is a natural choice for the next Christmas concert. And the audience will definitely sing along....

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £8.50

    Theme from "Star Trek" - Alexander Courage - Thomas Doss

    Who doesn't know the famous introduction "To boldly go where no man has gone before" at the beginning of each Star Trek sequel? Many generations grew up with Star Trek - one of the most iconic Sci-Fi series ever written. The original theme is as iconic as the opening line. A great warm up for the next Star Trek series in 2017, arranged by Thomas Doss.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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