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    Buy from Peter Meechan Music

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    SLOW RIDE IN A STATIC MACHINE, A (Brass Band) - Lawrence, Phil

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda!Phil Lawrence.Duration:4:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    An Age of Kings (Mezzo-Soprano Solo with Brass Band and optional choir - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The origins of this work date back to 1988, when I was commissioned by the Royal Shakespeare Company to write the music for The Plantagenets trilogy, directed by Adrian Noble in Stratford-upon-Avon. These plays take us from the death of Henry V to the death of Richard III. Later, in 1991, I wrote the music for Henry IV parts 1 and 2, again in Stratford. All of these plays are concerned with the struggle for the throne, and they portray one of the most turbulent periods in the history of the British monarchy.Much of the music used in these productions was adapted into two large symphonic suites for wind band – The Sword and the Crown (1991) and The Kings Go Forth (1996). An Age of Kings is a new version for brass band incorporating music from both the symphonic suites for wind band. It was specially composed for a recording made by the Black Dyke Band, conducted by Nicholas Childs, in 2004.An Age of Kings is music on a large-scale canvas, scored for augmented brass band, with the addition of harp, piano, mezzo-soprano solo, male chorus, as well as two off-stage trumpets. The music is also organized on a large-scale structure, in three movements, which play without a break – “Church and State”, “At the Welsh Court”, and “Battle Music and Hymn of Thanksgiving”.The first movement, “Church and State”, opens with a brief fanfare for two antiphonal trumpets (off-stage), but this only acts as a preface to a Requiem aeternam (the death of Henry V) before changing mood to the English army on the march to France; this subsides into a French victory march, but with the English army music returning in counterpoint. A brief reminder of the Requiem music leads to the triumphal music for Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York, father of Edward IV and Richard III (the opening fanfare transformed). However, the mood changes dramatically once again, with the horrors of war being portrayed in the darkly-drawn Dies Irae and Dance of Death, leading to the final section of the first movement, a funeral march for Henry VI.The second movement, “At the Welsh Court”, takes music from the Welsh Court in Henry IV part 1 with a simple Welsh folk tune sung by mezzo-soprano to the inevitable accompaniment of a harp. This love song is interrupted by distant fanfares, forewarning of battles to come. However, the folk song returns with variation in the musical fabric. The movement ends as it began with off-stage horn and gentle percussion.The final movement, “Battle Music and Hymn of Thanksgiving“, starts with two sets of antiphonally placed timpani, drums and tam-tam, portraying the ‘war machine’ and savagery of battle. Trumpet fanfares and horn calls herald an heroic battle theme which, by the end of the movement, transforms itself into a triumphant hymn for Henry IV’s defeat of the rebellious forces.- Edward GregsonDuration - 22'00"Optional TTBB available separately.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £57.00

    The Universal Band Collection (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    A collection of 5 short works in pop style which can be performed by any kind of compilation. The titles can be presented on the programme as separate works but the Universal Band Collection can also be performed as a complete suite. From a didactic point of view it is a suitable work to teach musicians something about the structure in music. For this purpose not only the big structure but also the small structure was kept very clear.Western Girl : A girl from the west of the USA rides her horse across the prairie, dreaming of her future. The rough structure: introduction - theme in a blues scale - the same thing in a different instrumentation - finale.Just a ballad : A ballad in pop style with a rough A-B-A form. First there is the introduction of the main theme (A), then follows a tenor melody in minor with a rhythmical reference to the main theme (B). Finally there is the main melody, performed tutti with a different rhythm in the drums (A').Play the Game : An English saying meaning: play fairly. Playful music in up-tempo with a wink to China, where almost all games are manufactured nowadays. Once again an A-B-A structure here.San Diego : A Mexican fugitive enjoys his freedom in America but also remembers his place of birth with melancholy. A sad minor melody with a straight trendy beat appears twice. The second time it has a slightly different instrumentation, in which the muted trumpets represent the Mexican feeling.Final Dance : Eventually there is a dance with an introduction in renaissance style, followed by a fast dance in rock style. All this composed in a classical song structure: introduction, verse, bridge, chorus, shortened verse, bridge, chorus, chorus. 10:37

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    On the Castle Green - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    I was contacted by conductor and friend Desmond Graham who wanted to have a traditional concert march composed to celebrate the Golden Jubilee of his band; The Third Carrickfergus Band.Immediately my mind started wandering as I thought about all the great marches that I have enjoyed playing and listening to over the years. So when I put pen to paper I had already planned out the structure of the march and which instruments to feature.The march itself is split into two halves, the first in a minor key the second in a major key. The opening section starting loudly in F minor features stereotypical passages one would come to recognise in a traditional concert march: a cornet solo, a melodic bridging section and a robust bass solo led by the basses and trombones.The second half of the march changes pace and mood as it lifts into a major key giving it a more lighter feel. We hear a second cornet solo which plays the second theme of the march. After a second bridge section the theme is played by the front row cornets to allow the soprano to play an obligato melody similar to that heard in marches like “Army of the Nile” and “Stars and Stripes Forever”. It all builds to a grandioso ending where the tempo drops and the final theme is played with a quick accel to the end.As for the title? In Carrickfergus lies an old castle that faces the town which is situated on a small plot of luscious green grass – “On The Castle Green”.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    TRUMPETS OF THE ANGELS (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The Trumpets of the Angels was commissioned by the Fodens (Courtois) Band for their centenary concert at The Bridgewater Hall in 2000. It is based on a work written for the BBC Philharmonic and Huddersfield Choral Society in 1998, the starting point of which was a quotation from the Book of Revelation:and I saw the seven angels which stood before God; and to them were given seven trumpetsThus the idea behind the work is dramatic and I have tried to achieve this by the spatial deployment of seven solo trumpets around the band, four on-stage, the others off-stage. Six of the solo trumpets eventually join the band, but Trumpet 7 remains off-stage and, indeed, has the most dramatic and extended cadenza representing the words of the seventh angel …and time shall be no more.The Trumpets of the Angels is a large-scale work, scored for seven solo trumpets, brass band, organ and percussion (deploying ‘dark’ instruments such as tam-tams, bass drum and two sets of timpani). The work opens with a four-note motif announced by off-stage horns and baritones and answered by fanfare figures on solo trumpets. In turn, each of the first four solo trumpets play cadenzas and then all four join together, independently playing their own music. The organ enters dramatically with its own cadenza, leading to the entry of solo trumpets 5 and 6 with music that is more urgent and rhythmic, describing the horsemen of the Apocalypse.The music reaches another climax, more intense this time, with the horns and baritones (now on-stage) again sounding the transformed motif, before subsiding into what might be described as a lament for humanity, slow music which builds from low to high, from soft to loud, with a melody that is both simple and poignant. At the climax, Trumpet 7 enters playing the opening four-note motif, dramatically extended to almost three octaves. This cadenza (to the partial accompaniment of tam-tams) introduces new material and foreshadows the ensuing scherzo which is fast and aggressive. Despite the somewhat desolate mood of this music, it slowly moves towards an optimistic conclusion, transforming the ‘humanity’ music into an affirmative and triumphant statement.- Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    TRUMPETS OF THE ANGELS (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    The Trumpets of the Angels was commissioned by the Fodens (Courtois) Band for their centenary concert at The Bridgewater Hall in 2000. It is based on a work written for the BBC Philharmonic and Huddersfield Choral Society in 1998, the starting point of which was a quotation from the Book of Revelation:and I saw the seven angels which stood before God; and to them were given seven trumpetsThus the idea behind the work is dramatic and I have tried to achieve this by the spatial deployment of seven solo trumpets around the band, four on-stage, the others off-stage. Six of the solo trumpets eventually join the band, but Trumpet 7 remains off-stage and, indeed, has the most dramatic and extended cadenza representing the words of the seventh angel …and time shall be no more.The Trumpets of the Angels is a large-scale work, scored for seven solo trumpets, brass band, organ and percussion (deploying ‘dark’ instruments such as tam-tams, bass drum and two sets of timpani). The work opens with a four-note motif announced by off-stage horns and baritones and answered by fanfare figures on solo trumpets. In turn, each of the first four solo trumpets play cadenzas and then all four join together, independently playing their own music. The organ enters dramatically with its own cadenza, leading to the entry of solo trumpets 5 and 6 with music that is more urgent and rhythmic, describing the horsemen of the Apocalypse.The music reaches another climax, more intense this time, with the horns and baritones (now on-stage) again sounding the transformed motif, before subsiding into what might be described as a lament for humanity, slow music which builds from low to high, from soft to loud, with a melody that is both simple and poignant. At the climax, Trumpet 7 enters playing the opening four-note motif, dramatically extended to almost three octaves. This cadenza (to the partial accompaniment of tam-tams) introduces new material and foreshadows the ensuing scherzo which is fast and aggressive. Despite the somewhat desolate mood of this music, it slowly moves towards an optimistic conclusion, transforming the ‘humanity’ music into an affirmative and triumphant statement.- Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Black and White Rag - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    I have taken this tune and arranged it as a xylophone solo with brass band accompaniment.When performing the piece it is relatively straight forward. However, the soloist needs to be aware that the split part at rehearsal figure B in the first four bars is a melody and accompanying figure.The ‘stride like’ quavers that start on notes C and G are to be played with the left stick, while the syncopated solo melody line is to be played with the right stick. At the fifth bar of figure B the soloist can play the semiquavers as they see fit and then return to their ‘stride’ style at bar 46 and so on when it appears.This is a great Rag and it works really well as a solo showcase for xylophone.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    TRUMPETS OF THE ANGELS - 2016 Edition (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    The Trumpets of the Angels is a large-scale work, scored for seven solo trumpets (or cornets), brass band and percussion (deploying ‘dark’ instruments such as three tam-tams, bass drum and two sets of timpani). The genesis of the work is a quotation from the Book of Revelation … and I saw the seven angels which stood before God; and to them were given seven trumpets.Thus the idea behind the work is highly dramatic and I have tried to achieve this by the spatial deployment of seven solo trumpets around the band. Trumpet 7 remains separate from the band throughout and, indeed, has the most dramatic and extended cadenza, representing the words of the seventh angel … and time shall be no more.The work opens with a four-note motif announced by off-stage horns and baritones and answered by fanfare figures on four solo trumpets. In turn, each then play cadenzas before joining together, independently playing their own music. This leads to a sung Kyrie Eleison with accompanying solos for Flugel Horn and Baritone, after which we hear the entry of solo trumpets 5 and 6 with music that is more urgent and rhythmic, describing the Horsemen of the Apocalypse.The music reaches another climax, more intense this time, with the horns and baritones (now on-stage) again sounding the transformed motif, before subsiding into what might be described as a lament of humanity – slow, yearning music, which builds from low to high, from soft to loud, with a melody that is both simple and poignant. At its climax, Trumpet 7 makes a dramatic entry, playing the opening four-note motif, but expanded to almost three octaves. This cadenza (to the partial accompaniment of 3 tam-tams, representing the Holy Trinity) introduces new material and foreshadows the ensuing Scherzo, introduced by antiphonal timpani before the band enters with music that is fast and foreboding. Despite the somewhat desolate and ‘unstable’ mood of this music, it slowly moves towards an optimistic conclusion, transforming the ‘humanity’ music into an affirmative and triumphant statement.The original version of The Trumpets of the Angels was commissioned by the Fodens Band for their centenary concert at The Bridgewater Hall, Manchester, in 2000, and contained an important part for organ. In 2015 I was asked by Nicholas Childs to create a New Performing Edition for the Black Dyke Band; without organ, and including newly composed material. This New Performing Edition was given its first performance at the European Brass Band Festival in Lille in April 2016. The work is dedicated In tribute to Olivier Messiaen.- Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    TRUMPETS OF THE ANGELS - 2016 Edition (Gregson) (Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    The Trumpets of the Angels is a large-scale work, scored for seven solo trumpets (or cornets), brass band and percussion (deploying ‘dark’ instruments such as three tam-tams, bass drum and two sets of timpani). The genesis of the work is a quotation from the Book of Revelation … and I saw the seven angels which stood before God; and to them were given seven trumpets.Thus the idea behind the work is highly dramatic and I have tried to achieve this by the spatial deployment of seven solo trumpets around the band. Trumpet 7 remains separate from the band throughout and, indeed, has the most dramatic and extended cadenza, representing the words of the seventh angel … and time shall be no more.The work opens with a four-note motif announced by off-stage horns and baritones and answered by fanfare figures on four solo trumpets. In turn, each then play cadenzas before joining together, independently playing their own music. This leads to a sung Kyrie Eleison with accompanying solos for Flugel Horn and Baritone, after which we hear the entry of solo trumpets 5 and 6 with music that is more urgent and rhythmic, describing the Horsemen of the Apocalypse.The music reaches another climax, more intense this time, with the horns and baritones (now on-stage) again sounding the transformed motif, before subsiding into what might be described as a lament of humanity – slow, yearning music, which builds from low to high, from soft to loud, with a melody that is both simple and poignant. At its climax, Trumpet 7 makes a dramatic entry, playing the opening four-note motif, but expanded to almost three octaves. This cadenza (to the partial accompaniment of 3 tam-tams, representing the Holy Trinity) introduces new material and foreshadows the ensuing Scherzo, introduced by antiphonal timpani before the band enters with music that is fast and foreboding. Despite the somewhat desolate and ‘unstable’ mood of this music, it slowly moves towards an optimistic conclusion, transforming the ‘humanity’ music into an affirmative and triumphant statement.The original version of The Trumpets of the Angels was commissioned by the Fodens Band for their centenary concert at The Bridgewater Hall, Manchester, in 2000, and contained an important part for organ. In 2015 I was asked by Nicholas Childs to create a New Performing Edition for the Black Dyke Band; without organ, and including newly composed material. This New Performing Edition was given its first performance at the European Brass Band Festival in Lille in April 2016. The work is dedicated In tribute to Olivier Messiaen.- Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days