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  • £46.50

    The Witches' Sabbath - Berlioz, H.

    Arranged as part of a series of finishers (together with Pines of Rome, Procession to the Minster, Entry of The Gods, Bolero, Daphnis, American in Paris etc., etc.,) the full title is 'The Dream of the Witches' Sabbath'. It should have been 'Nightmare.' Shock tactics rarely continue to work for very long in music, buut here they do. This arrangement contains one unique technical feature of its own.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £14.95

    Procession of the Nobles - N. Rimsky-Korsakov

    Procession of the Nobles comes from Rimsky-Korsakov's Opera-Ballet Mlada written in 1890.Mlada is engaged to be married to Yaromir but a jealous woman Voyslava murders her. With the help of Morena, the Goddess of the Underworld, Voyslava seduces Yaromir into loving her instead.The spirit of Mlada eventually intervenes in Voyslava's intensions and Mlada manages to entice Yaromir to a Witches Sabbath, where he is shown images of Voyslava committing the murder.Procession of the Nobles or Procession of the Princes comes from act II of the opera, where a midsummer festival is taking place and Mlada begins to intervene with Voyslava's plans.This stirring cort?ge has been skilfully arranged for Tuba Quartet by Denis Burton.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £44.00

    Procession of the Sorcerers - Robert Buckley

    Imagine a procession of wizards and witches, clowns and jugglers, magicians and troubadours, goblins, dragons, fairies and sprites, accompanied by colourful wagons, unicorns, stilt walkers and unicycles. All have one goal - the castle of the great Merlin. A multitude of melodies interweave, some ornamented, some medieval, as they eventually reach their fi nal destination.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £58.10
  • £44.95

    The Pendle Witches - Nigel Clarke

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £46.50

    The Witches' Sabbath - H. Berlioz

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £65.00 £65.00
    Buy from Peter Meechan Music

    Macbeth - Peter Meechan

    Commissioned by the Scottish Brass Band Association for the 2007 Scottish Open Championship, Macbeth takes its' inspiration from the Shakespeare play of the same name. Character portraits (Of the three witches as well as Macbeth himself), abstractions (The lament), and scenes (Macbeth's final battle with Macduff) make up the 9 interconnected movements:i: Witches, ii: Dagger, iii: General Macbeth, iv: Contemplations of Lady Macbeth, v: Lament, vi: Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow, vii: A spell still cast, viii: Final Battle, ix: Not of woman born

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days