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  • £29.95

    THIS IS MY STORY (Cornet or Trumpet Solo with Brass Band Set) - Krister Lundkvist

    A 'Latin' style solo for cornet or trumpet based on the hymn tune 'Blessed Assurance'.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £29.95

    Judd: This is My Story

    A 'Latin' style solo for cornet or trumpet based on the hymn tune 'Blessed Assurance'.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £40.00

    Meditation: It is Well With My Soul

    Cantatio are pleased to release this hymn meditation on the much loved hymn by Adam D J Taylor. Commissioned by the world famous Wingates Band, this arrangement became a centrepiece of the band's online presence during the recent COVID pandemic. It has sat unpublished since, and we're excited to share it with the wider banding world. Story time... Horatio Spafford was a successful attorney and real estate investor who lost a fortune in the great Chicago fire of 1871. Around the same time, his beloved four-year-old son died of scarlet fever. Thinking a vacation would do his family some good, he sent his wife and four daughters on a ship to England, planning to join them after he finished some pressing business at home. However, while crossing the Atlantic Ocean, the ship was involved in a terrible collision and sunk. More than 200 people lost their lives, including all four of Horatio Spafford's precious daughters. His wife, Anna, survived the tragedy. Upon arriving in England, she sent a telegram to her husband that began: "Saved alone. What shall I do?" Horatio immediately set sail for England. At one point during his voyage, the captain of the ship, aware of the tragedy that had struck the Spafford family, summoned Horatio to tell him that they were now passing over the spot where the shipwreck had occurred. As Horatio thought about his daughters, words of comfort and hope filled his heart and mind. He wrote them down, and they have since become a well-beloved hymn: When peace like a river, attendeth my way, When sorrows like sea billows roll-- Whatever my lot, thou hast taught me to say It is well, it is well with my soul.

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £61.00

    On My Own - Vocal or Instrumental Solo - Boublil-Schoenberg - John Philip Hannevik

    "On my Own" is now regarded as one of the most famous songs from "Les Miserables", the incredibly popular musical by Claude-Michel Schonberg and Alain Boublil. The story is based on a novel by Victor Hugo. In the song, Eponine sings about her love for Marius, and she dreams about having a life with him.Solo-Options in this arrangement: Vocal. Bb-Instruments, Eb-Instruments

    Estimated dispatch 12-14 working days
  • £35.00

    Tomorrow Shall Be My Dancing Day (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - McKenzie, Jock

    Tomorrow Shall Be My Dancing Day is a traditional carol. Its first notated appearance was in William B. Sandy's collection 'Christmas Carols Ancient and Modern' in 1888. The verses of the carol progress through the story of Jesus - as told in his own voice. It is thought the origins of this carol are rooted in the fourteenth century. Duration: 3.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £90.30

    On My Own - Boublil

    "On my Own" is now regarded as one of the most famous songs from "Les Miserables", the incredibly popular musical by Claude-Michel Schonberg and Alain Boublil. The story is based on a novel by Victor Hugo. In the song, Eponine sings about her love for Marius, and she dreams about having a life with him. Solo-Options in this arrangement: Vocal. Bb-Instruments, Eb-Instruments

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £61.60

    Avifauna (Brass Band) Joshua Tyler Jameson

    This highly descriptive work was commissioned by the National Youth Brass Band of America and will be a terrific concert or entertainment contest item. The music paints the picture of the lives of a variety of different birds. The composer writes: 'When I began thinking about this project I was sitting in my office in the early morning, the sun having just risen. There was a gentle breeze and the only thing that I could hear (aside from my hungry whining cats) was the gentle song of the birds outside my open window. As much of my work is programmatic, almost like symphonic poems, this immediately gave me the image of a majestic sunrise with all types of birds fluttering about, almost as if out of an episode of Planet Earth. When I was commissioned by the National Youth Brass Band of America, I knew the project had to be something the ensemble could grab onto. Something they could see. Something they could relate to. There being so many types of birds in North America, I selected a handful to help tell my story... The scene where I came up with this idea seemed to be the perfect starting point. Sunrise, tiny chirps of Morning Birds floating around the twilight of dawn, swiftly moving towards the majesty of the sun cresting the horizon. A new day, the beginning of a story. As the sun rises higher in the sky, animal activity stirs, becoming lively and wild. The flowers have opened up to drink in the sun's rays, leaving them open to nectar-seeking Hummingbirds. Whizzing by at lightning speed, the hummingbirds journey from flower to flower, drinking their fill until the sun begins to set back over the horizon. When daylight fades, the enigmatic Owl floats silently through the sky. The wonder of these creatures comes not just from their beauty, but also from their mystery and their ferocity. We see images in pop culture of majestic white owls and marvel in their beauty... but to a mouse roaming the forest floor in the dark of the night, the terror of suddenly being dropped upon by a silent predator is anything but peaceful. In the dead of night, soft rolling clouds thicken as a storm begins to brew. With the ensuing rain also emerges the grotesque scavenging Vulture; marching along from carcass to carcass, tearing into the rotting leftovers of another predator's kill, gorging themselves until over-full. However, from this nightmare fuel of a bird, a new day awaits... As the dawn of another day approaches, you begin to hear the same morning birds you heard the previous day. When the light finally breaks the horizon, the soaring majesty of the Eagle drives us to the end of our story; an exciting journey told through the eyes of the winged creatures that paint the skies of North America. This is Avifauna.' To view a follow-the-score video please visit: www.youtube.com/watch?v=J2bhBpx9KvM Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.solidbrassmusic.com Difficulty Level: 2nd Section + Instrumentation: Soprano Cornet Eb Solo Cornet Bb Repiano Cornet Bb 2nd Cornet Bb 3rd Cornet Bb Flugel Horn Bb Solo Horn Eb 1st Horn Eb 2nd Horn Eb 1st Baritone Bb 2nd Baritone Bb 1st Trombone Bb 2nd Trombone Bb Bass Trombone Euphonium Bb Bass Eb Bass Bb Percussion 1-4

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days
  • £38.95

    Unity Series Band Journal - Numbers 474 - 477, February 2019

    474: Prelude - Tell me the old, old story (Munashe Chikwezvero)Arabella Hankey's verses (S.A.S.B. 150) were originally written in 1866 while the author was recovering from a serious illness. The music was then added by William Howard Doane in 1868. This prelude comes to us from a Salvationist composer from the Hunyani Corps in the Zimbabwe Territory.475: My Redeemer lives (Marcus Venables)This lively arrangement of My Redeemer lives (S.A.S.B. 223) was written for the North York Temple Junior Band. The music is designed to emulate the more challenging Salvation Army band pieces to which younger musicians might aspire, as well as being a joyful announcement of our Redeemer's resurrection.476: Filte (Roger Trigg)Filte (FAHL-cheh) is the Irish word for welcome. This music was written to commemorate the start of The Salvation Army's work in Ireland. It features the tune The Eden Above (T.B. 503) which is purported to be the first song performed by a Salvation Army delegation on Irish soil. The next hymn presented is King of kings, majesty (S.A.S.B. 376) which has been a significant song in the life of Belfast Citadel Corps in its more recent past. The piece closes with the confident music of the song I believe we shall win (S.A.S.B. 990).477: Chorus Arrangement - Follow, I will follow thee (Morgan Juel Stavik)This is a gentle setting of H.L. Brown's melody Follow, I will follow thee.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £74.95

    Eden (Score and Parts)

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:"...The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way."My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:"...Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold."So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, flgel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here - in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry - a huge man-made wound in the earth - immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work's conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £29.50

    Eden (Score Only)

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton's epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:"...The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way."My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:"...Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold."So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, flgel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here - in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry - a huge man-made wound in the earth - immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work's conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days