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  • £19.50

    Hut Six - Len Jenkins

    A great march (perfect for contests such as whit Fridays) dedicated to the memory of those who worked at Bletchley Park, Milton Keynes, England, in World War 2. They were under the brilliant leadership of Alan Turing and were responsible for breaking the secret military codes used by the Enemy Forces (German in particular). The composer, Len Jenkins, lives close to Bletchley Park, went to school even closer, and attended Training Courses actually in 'The Park'. The march has memorable themes and is toe tapping for the audience.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £142.99

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

     PDF View Music

  • £125.00

    Music of the Spheres - Philip Sparke

    Music of the Spheres was commissioned by the Yorkshire Building Society Band and first performed by them at the European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow, May 2004. The piece reflects the composers fascination with the origins of the universe and deep space in general. The title comes from a theory, formulated by Pythagoras, that the cosmos was ruled by the same laws he had discovered that govern the ratios of note frequencies of the musical scale. ('Harmonia' in Ancient Greek, which means scale or tuning rather than harmony - Greek music was monophonic). He also believed that these ratios corresponded to the distances of the six known planets from the sun and thatthe planets each produced a musical note which combined to weave a continuous heavenly melody (which, unfortunately, we humans cannot hear). In this work, these six notes form the basis of the sections Music of the Spheres and Harmonia. The pieces opens with a horn solo called t = 0, a name given by some scientists to the moment of the Big Bang when time and space were created, and this is followed by a depiction of the Big Bang itself, as the entire universe bursts out from a single point. A slower section follows called The Lonely Planet which is a meditation on the incredible and unlikely set of circumstances which led to the creation of the Earth as a planet that can support life, and the constant search for other civilizations elsewhere in the universe. Asteroids and Shooting Stars depicts both the benign and dangerous objects that are flying through space and which constantly threaten our planet, and the piece ends with The Unknown, leaving in question whether our continually expanding exploration of the universe will eventually lead to enlightenment or destruction.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Puffing Devil

    The Puffing Devil (2013) was commissioned by Camborne Trevithick Day Committee on the occasion of Camborne's 30th Trevithick Day celebration. The premiere performance of the work, written for brass band and children's choir, saw a massed performance by six brass bands and children from nine local schools. With the intention of being an educational work as well as a musical work, The Puffing Devil reflects the story of Richard Trevithick both in the lyrics and the musical material.A mysterious opening sees running semiquavers in the euphoniums as the flugel horn introduces the work with a solo, before the entry of the horns playing rhythmic quavers. The addition of the voices at the outset is for effect - working with the instruments to create the sound of a steam engine gathering pace simply to the words 'Trevithick'. Once a steady tempo is reached, themes are introduced and sung by the choir, where the vocal writing is a very simple singular-melody; easy for any primary school aged children to learn. An ending of grandeur in a majestic nature is presented, to create a big finish to a feel-good educational work.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £34.95

    The Puffing Devil - Christopher Bond

    For Children's Choir and Brass BandThe Puffing Devil (2013) was commissioned by Camborne Trevithick Day Committee on the occasion of Camborne’s 30th Trevithick Day celebration. The premiere performance of the work, written for brass band and children’s choir, saw a massed performance by six brass bands and children from nine local schools. With the intention of being an educational work as well as a musical work, The Puffing Devil reflects the story of Richard Trevithick both in the lyrics and the musical material. A mysterious opening sees running semiquavers in the euphoniums as the flugel horn introduces the work with a solo, before the entry of the horns playing rhythmic quavers. The addition of the voices at the outset is for effect – working with the instruments to create the sound of a steam engine gathering pace simply to the words ‘Trevithick’. Once a steady tempo is reached, themes are introduced and sung by the choir, where the vocal writing is a very simple singular-melody; easy for any primary school aged children to learn. An ending of grandeur in a majestic nature is presented, to create a big finish to a feel-good educational work.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    On Winter Hill - Dan Price

    Winter Hill is situated in the North West of England within the West Pennine Moors. It is a popular destination for walkers and on a clear day it offers views across Manchester, Liverpool, Blackpool, the Isle of Man, the Cumbrian Mountains and the Peak District. The hill is well named as there is an ever-present blusteriness even during the summer.On Winter Hill is an evocative concert item for solo euphonium and brass band which tells the story of a journey, in music, to the summit of the hill.The work opens with a quiet ostinato on solo cornets which is a musical interpretation of the swirling wind dancing around the peak of the summit. The wind is ever present on the hill and so is the ostinato building in volume and intensity as the journey progresses. The solo line uses modal writing and is fashioned as a ‘folksong without words' and gives work a feeling of melancholy and of ‘days gone by'. Perhaps the listener can imagine looking out from the side of the hill across the valley towards the now silent chimneys of industry.The summit of the hill is finally reached six bars before Figure G, which is the moment you walk into the wall of wind and sound that takes your breath away for a moment, but gives you an immense sense of achievement. The music here should be full and rich giving the soloist a moment to catch their breath. The work closes at the start of the descent from that moment you step off the peak of the hill and you are already back in a different world.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £49.99

    Conzensus - Jan Van der Roost

    This stately concert opener was originally written by Jan Van der Roost for a special event in which six respected wind orchestras (two Belgian and four Dutch) of different composition (two symphonic bands, two fanfare bands and two brass bands) were featured during six concerts. Each evening brought forth a performance by a symphonic band, a fanfare, and brass band, so that the audience could experience all three types of ensembles. This was indeed an original concept.The name, ConZEnSus, comes from a combination of the words, 'Concert Cyclus' (concert series) and 'zes' (Dutch for 'six'). This leads to a new word, which refers to 'consensus'. The general tenor of the cycle is thus immediately indicated. The richness of color of the various ensembles is revealed through an open and friendly atmosphere. During all six concerts (over a span of three years), ConZEnSus functioned as a permanent opening number for each orchestra. Thus the same musical story was portrayed in three different packages.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £69.95

    TUBA CONCERTO (Gregson) (Tuba Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    This work was commissioned by the Besses o’ th’ Barn Band with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was written for, and is dedicated to, John Fletcher, who gave the first performance in Middleton Civic Hall, near Manchester, on 24 April, 1976, with Besses o’ th’ Barn Band conducted by the composer. Another interesting feature about the premi?re was that it was recorded by BBC Television for an Omnibus programme with Andr? Previn as presenter. The concerto exists in four versions: with brass band (1976), orchestra (1978), wind band (1984) and piano reduction.The concerto is in three movements, following the usual, quick-slow-quick pattern: Allegro deciso,Lento e mesto, Allegro giocoso. The first movement has a sonata form shell with two contrasting themes, the first one being rhythmic in character, the second lyrical. There is a reference made in passing to the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto, but this merges into the other material in the development section.The second movement begins with a chorale, but after the entry of the tuba it leads to a cantabile theme, softly unfolded by the soloist. The opening chorale passage returns, this time briefly on muted brass, and leads to a middle section which is more chromatic in style and soon builds to a powerful climax, where the opening cantabile theme triumphantly returns. The music subsides, returning to the opening chorale and ending peacefully.The finale is light and breezy in style, and is cast in rondo form. After a brief introduction the tuba announces the main rondo theme, which is dance-like and a little jaunty. There are two episodes: the first a broad sweeping tune, the second a slowish waltz and a little jazz-like. After a virtuoso cadenza reference is made to the very opening of the concerto before the work ends with a triumphal flourish.The Tuba Concerto has established itself as one of the main works in the solo tuba repertoire. It has been performed and broadcast in over 40 countries all over the world. There are currently six commercial recordings of the concerto in its various versions.resolution in C major, pointed by a simple but expansive melody towards which the piece has been heading, and ending in a blaze of joyful colour.Duration: 18 mins

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    TUBA CONCERTO (Gregson) (Tuba Solo with Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    Brass Band Score onlyThis work was commissioned by the Besses o’ th’ Barn Band with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was written for, and is dedicated to, John Fletcher, who gave the first performance in Middleton Civic Hall, near Manchester, on 24 April, 1976, with Besses o’ th’ Barn Band conducted by the composer. Another interesting feature about the premi?re was that it was recorded by BBC Television for an Omnibus programme with Andr? Previn as presenter. The concerto exists in three versions: with brass band (1976), orchestra (1978) and wind band (1984).The concerto is in three movements, following the usual, quick-slow-quick pattern: Allegro deciso,Lento e mesto, Allegro giocoso. The first movement has a sonata form shell with two contrasting themes, the first one being rhythmic in character, the second lyrical. There is a reference made in passing to the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto, but this merges into the other material in the development section.The second movement begins with a chorale, but after the entry of the tuba it leads to a cantabile theme, softly unfolded by the soloist. The opening chorale passage returns, this time briefly on muted brass, and leads to a middle section which is more chromatic in style and soon builds to a powerful climax, where the opening cantabile theme triumphantly returns. The music subsides, returning to the opening chorale and ending peacefully.The finale is light and breezy in style, and is cast in rondo form. After a brief introduction the tuba announces the main rondo theme, which is dance-like and a little jaunty. There are two episodes: the first a broad sweeping tune, the second a slowish waltz and a little jazz-like. After a virtuoso cadenza reference is made to the very opening of the concerto before the work ends with a triumphal flourish.The Tuba Concerto has established itself as one of the main works in the solo tuba repertoire. It has been performed and broadcast in over 40 countries all over the world. There are currently six commercial recordings of the concerto in its various versions.resolution in C major, pointed by a simple but expansive melody towards which the piece has been heading, and ending in a blaze of joyful colour.Duration: 18 mins

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Smile - Charlie Chaplin - Jonathan Bates

    Smile received its premiere at The Sage, Gateshead, on November 17th 2014 by trombone soloist Chris Gomersall and the Grimethorpe Colliery Band conducted by Robert Childs. The piece formed part of their winning Brass in Concert programme entitled ‘Lest We Forget'.A young Charlie Chaplin starred in his first movie in February 1914, six months after the outbreak of World War I, and by July 1915 Chaplin had become a cultural phenomenon as the great entertainer. He was the film industry's first international star and a particular favourite of the troops.Conceived as the instrumental theme for Chaplin's 1936 comedy Modern Times, the song known to us all as Smile was composed by Chaplin himself. This arrangement features the original version of the song, before breaking into an upbeat big band version of the song, as performed by Michael Buble, featuring an extended jazz break for either Flugel Horn or Cornet.Al Sharq has been recorded by Grimethorpe Colliery Band on their CD 'Grimethorpe Entertain' available to buy here.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days