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  • £10.00

    Daphnis & Chlo? Suite 2: (Study Score ONLY) - Ravel, M.

    THIS PURCHASE OPTION IS FOR THE STUDY SCORE ONLY, IN A 4 FORMAT. This score is available from September 10th on this website only, until October 20th 2012, when it will be on sale at the British National Brass Band Championships at the Royal Albert Hall

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £34.50

    Daphnis & Chlo?: (Conductor's Large Format Score Only) - Ravel, M.

    THIS PURCHASE OPTION IS FOR THE CONDUCTOR'S LARGE FORMAT SCORE ONLY AND DOES NOT INCLUDE ANY OF THE PARTS. It is produced especially in A3 large format due to the complexity of some passages of the arrangement. This revised (2012) version of the complete Second Suite from RAVEL's DAPHNIS & CHLOE arranged by Howard Snell, has been chosen as the test piece for the Championship Section of the NATIONAL BRASS BAND CHAMPIONSHIPS OF GREAT BRITAIN of 2012 at the Royal Albert Hall. First performed complete by massed bands at the Gala Concert following the 1986 Finals at the RAH, it very appropriately celebrates the 100th Anniversary of the 1st performance of the complete Ballet in Paris in 1912. The study score to be issued for the Contest, is now in preparation, and will be available only through this site prior to the day of the Contest, October 20th, 2012.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £25.00

    As Above, So Below ??" Score Only - Jay Capperauld

    (This listing is for the purchase of a Score ONLY. To order a complete set of score and parts please click here.)An original composition for brass band and brass quintet by Jay Capperauld was commissioned by John Wallace and The Wallace Collection with the support of the PRS Foundation’s Beyond Borders. This major work enjoyed its world premiere at The Cumnock Tryst on 30 September 2017 at Cumnock Old Church, performed by The Wallace Collection and Dalmellington Band, conducted by Martyn Brabbins.If you would like to perform this work, please don’t hesitate considering The Wallace Collection to provide the brass quintet elements – if you would like to discuss potential performances, please contact us on [email protected] NotesBased on the Hermetic maxim "As Above, So Below", the phrase comes from the cryptic text of The Emerald Tablet, which was purportedly written by a mysterious character who is thought of as an amalgamation of Greek and Egyptian Gods, Hermes Trismegistus. The text first appears in Arabic between the 6th and 8th Centuries and is intended to outline the primitive and hidden sources that constitute the basis of all matter in the universe. The phrase "As Above, So Below" implies an essential "oneness" of all matter and a correlation between the physical elements and supernatural entities that make up our surroundings. The philosophies expressed within The Emerald Tablet have become a founding principle of Alchemy, Occultism, Witchcraft, Theosophy and various other ancient gnostic systems of belief, and this work attempts to explore these forms of so-called "secret knowledge" in a ritualistic trance-like Adagio steeped in the esoteric.The Brass Band is placed at the centre of the stage while the solo Brass Quintet are spread antiphonally around the concert hall and are placed above both the Brass Band and the audience in an attempt to create a direct dialogue between the Above and the Below. Therefore, the piece endeavours to explore the meaning behind the text of The Emerald Tablet as well as the phrase 'As Above, So Below' in a music context while giving particular attention to the ‘SOLVE’ (Latin for 'Separate' which correlates to the Above) and ‘COAGLUA’ (Latin for 'Join Together' which relates to the Below) that is depicted in the image of the Baphomet by the French occultist author, Eliphas Levi, which is a visual representation of the phrase ‘As Above, So Below’.Additional Note of InterestIt was not until the work was complete that the role of the main melody became clear when an unexpected and inadvertent correlation between this melody and that of the Latin Dies Irae presented itself. The plainchant nature of As Above, So Below's melody became a defining feature of the piece and when compared to the melody of the Dies Irae (a similar melody reminiscent of that contained within As Above, So Below), some interesting and unsettling implications unveiled themselves.The findings of a comparison can be interpreted as follows:Both melodies adhere naturally to the plainchant idiom, which in itself strongly relates to a supernatural (or quasi-religious) element in both cases.Both melodies originate in the key of D; the Dies Irae resides in the Dorian Mode on D while the As Above, So Below melody inhabits the D Octatonic Scale.Both melodies can be divided into three distinct phrases, although the melody to As Above, So Below can be divided into three phrases in a number of ambiguous ways.The most striking and unnerving connection is that, by pure chance, the Latin text to the Dies Irae fits perfectly under both melodies giving an entirely specific context to how the melodies are perceived.By understanding the As Above, So Below melody as an alternative to that of the Dies Irae and by interpreting it in the same context, the connotations of the Dies Irae's otherworldliness, and the suggestion of a dialogue with the supernatural and death adds a richer dimension to the As Above, So Below melody which in turn solidifies the esoteric concept of this work.In conclusion, this unanticipated and purely accidental relationship between both melodies is worthy of note more so from an emotional and contextual perspective rather than from any analytical evaluation concerning the music itself - it is the circumstance of the so-called "secret knowledge" that has presented itself within the inner workings of As Above, So Below.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £20.00 £20.00
    Buy from IMAS Music

    Plus Ultra (Score Only) - Andrew Stevenson

    - SCORE ONLY -Plus Ultra was commissioned for the Intermediate section of the 2015 National Youth Championships of Great BritainPlus Ultra is based on the twelve labours of Hercules, in particular the tenth. During the completion of this labour, Hercules had to split a mountain apart and sail into an unknown part of the world. By splitting the mountain, he connected the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea and formed the Straight of Gibraltar. One part of the split mountain is Gibraltar and the other is Monte Hacho. These two mountains taken together have since then been known as the Pillars of Hercules.The Pillars appear as supporters of the coat of arms of Spain. The motto Plus Ultra (Latin for further beyond) is closely associated with the Pillars of Hercules to mark the edge of the then known world. According to mythology, the pillars bore the warning "Non plus ultra" (nothing further beyond) serving as a warning to sailors and navigators to go no further.The music in Plus Ultra depicts the struggle of the tenth labour, the dividing of the mountain, the mystery of what lies beyond the known world and the triumphant return of Hercules after completing the task.

  • £10.00

    CAVATINA (from Der Freischutz) (Brass Band Score only) - Weber, Carl Maria Von - Gay, Bram

    Brass Band Score only. Parts available separately.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    CORNET CONCERTO (Ellerby) (Brass Band - Score only) - Ellerby, Martin

    Brass Band extra score only. This bright, optimistic, lyrical concerto, accessible to players and audiences alike, falls into three contrasting movements. Brilliante is a tradional sonata form with two subjects, first a lively fanfare type figure followed secondly by a cantabile theme. The Arietta has legato phrases with an overall singing quality from both the soloist and the band while the final movement, Rondino, is in rondo form with constant changes of metre creating a restless journey to a dynamic conclusion. Duration: 12 mins.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £29.99

    The Alchymist's Journal (Brass Band - Score only - Hesketh, Kenneth

    2015 National Championships Finals Testpiece - First Section - Extra score only.The Alchymist's Journal, subtitled Variants for brass band, was commissioned in 2001 by the Brass Band Heritage Trust and is dedicated to Paul Hindmarsh. This vibrant music is cast in the form of a series of extended symphonic variations based on a short theme heard at the start. After a quiet start, the music builds to an incisive and dramatic climax. Ideal for any First Section brass band contest.Suitable for 1st Section Bands and upDuration: 12 minutes

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    TUBA CONCERTO (Gregson) (Tuba Solo with Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    Brass Band Score onlyThis work was commissioned by the Besses o’ th’ Barn Band with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was written for, and is dedicated to, John Fletcher, who gave the first performance in Middleton Civic Hall, near Manchester, on 24 April, 1976, with Besses o’ th’ Barn Band conducted by the composer. Another interesting feature about the premi?re was that it was recorded by BBC Television for an Omnibus programme with Andr? Previn as presenter. The concerto exists in three versions: with brass band (1976), orchestra (1978) and wind band (1984).The concerto is in three movements, following the usual, quick-slow-quick pattern: Allegro deciso,Lento e mesto, Allegro giocoso. The first movement has a sonata form shell with two contrasting themes, the first one being rhythmic in character, the second lyrical. There is a reference made in passing to the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto, but this merges into the other material in the development section.The second movement begins with a chorale, but after the entry of the tuba it leads to a cantabile theme, softly unfolded by the soloist. The opening chorale passage returns, this time briefly on muted brass, and leads to a middle section which is more chromatic in style and soon builds to a powerful climax, where the opening cantabile theme triumphantly returns. The music subsides, returning to the opening chorale and ending peacefully.The finale is light and breezy in style, and is cast in rondo form. After a brief introduction the tuba announces the main rondo theme, which is dance-like and a little jaunty. There are two episodes: the first a broad sweeping tune, the second a slowish waltz and a little jazz-like. After a virtuoso cadenza reference is made to the very opening of the concerto before the work ends with a triumphal flourish.The Tuba Concerto has established itself as one of the main works in the solo tuba repertoire. It has been performed and broadcast in over 40 countries all over the world. There are currently six commercial recordings of the concerto in its various versions.resolution in C major, pointed by a simple but expansive melody towards which the piece has been heading, and ending in a blaze of joyful colour.Duration: 18 mins

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score Only - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    The Dark Side Of The Moon - Score Only - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    This piece was commissioned by Dr. Nicholas Childs and Black Dyke Band on behalf of Rotary International and received its world premi?re performance at St. David's Hall, Cardiff on Saturday 27th January 2007. It is dedicated to the composer's father, Harry Cooper.The music was selected by the National Contesting Council as the 3rd section test piece for the 2008 Regional Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. A Note from the Composer...Have you ever thought of a holiday destination, tourist attraction, event, place, site or period in history and thought 'I wonder what it would be like?' - somwhere you have never been and can only let your imagination run wild on. What would the place be like, and all the things surrounding it such as the mood, feelings you get experiencing it, the temperature? Who would be there and what you would see? This piece is my musical imagination of the dark side of the moon. I know from news reports, the internet and other footage that the moon is a very desolate place, very barren and rugged. So from the start the piece gives the listener a musical picture of the rugged landscape with little light and warmth.However, the one place that has had me thinking about is the side of the moon that we don't see in our night skies, the side of the moon with no sun and no light pollution from civilisation. I can only imagine the eeriness one would feel being stood in complete darkness on the moon's surface looking around.As you slowly explore the surroundings and your eyes drift up to the night sky, there is an awesome sight unfolding in front of you - countless stars and galaxies, planets and different solar systems and all right in front of you glistening from the light of the sun beaming from the other side of the moon. The Dark Side of the Moon portrays a musical picture of the whole experience as seen in my imagination taking the listener from the rugged landscape to the awesome beauty that sits endlessly in front of you.Paul Lovatt-Cooper, September 2007

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days