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  • £21.50

    Busy Line - Murry Semos - Gavin Somerset

    Originally a hit for Rose Murphy before being re-recorded by Peter Skellern on his 1982 album "A String Of Pearls", this arrangement is based on the Skellern recording which has a 'trad-jazz' feel throughout. The piece gives your band a chance to show off the soloists, including solo cornet, flugel, solo horn, solo trombone & bass section (however an optional cut is included which removes the soloists section). You may also remember the piece from the BT television adverts in 1990 with its unique use of the 'brr brr brr' sound! If you're looking for something new and entertaining for your concert program this year, look no further!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £32.67

    It is well - Trombone Solo with Brass Band (Philip Bliss arr. Kenneth Downie)

    This is a beautiful arrangement for solo trombone of the wonderful 18th century hymn tune, It is well with my soul, the music for which was written by Philip Bliss to words by Horatio Spafford. The arranger Kenneth Downie writes: 'The tune has a natural nobility which I feel suits the trombone, and the famous words are to be found in almost every hymn book. The final setting is inspired by the majestic hope of the words of the last verse, which were forged in the face of terrible trial and sadness.' To view a performance of the work (piano accompaniment version), please visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pwSqRY3Co8M Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.solidbrassmusic.com Instrumentation: Trombone Soloist Bb Soprano Cornet Eb Solo Cornet Bb 1st Cornet Bb 2nd Cornet Bb Flugel Horn Bb Solo Horn Eb 1st Horn Eb 2nd Horn Eb 1st Baritone Bb 2nd Baritone Bb 1st Trombone Bb 2nd Trombone Bb Bass Trombone Euphonium Bb Bass Eb Bass Bb Timpani Percussion

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £30.00

    National Express

    I first heard of the song National Express, which was in the British Top Ten in 1998, when my son Jon mentioned it last year. It was written and sung by Neil Hannon, with his group “The Divine Comedy”. Jon said that it would sound good played by a brass band. Tim Benson, solo trombone with Stannington Brass Band, also mentioned it on the internet forum, themouthpiece.com I spoke with Tim, and agreed to do a brass band arrangement with a special feature for solo trombone. In this arrangement, the solo trombone adds extra colour to a band arrangement which is a mixture of big band and country style. The trombone part is well within the capabilities of a good player. There is a comic element to this song, and the cornets and flugel contain an eight bar spoken part, which, if included, would enhance it’s entertainment value.Tim Benson took the music to rehearsal at Stannington Brass Band and it instantly became a hit with the band who left whistling the melody. The piece not only retains the fun of the original, but it cleverly uses the band, and a bit of additional vocals from the cornet section. “Tim Benson and the Stannington Brass Band would like to thank Tim Paton for the arrangement.” (Tim Benson).”National Express” is on Stannington Brass Band’s latest CD, “AND ALL THAT BRASS”, available from [email protected]”Pontins was brilliant… one of the highlights of my weekend was playing/performing National Express… absolutely belting arrangement Tim… I love it!” Message from Fiona, who performed with themouthpiece.com scratch band at the Pontins Brass Band Championships in Prestatyn.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £74.95

    Eden (Score and Parts) - Pickard, John

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £29.50

    Eden (Score Only) - Pickard, John

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £30.00

    Here's That Rainy Day

    Trombone Solo.In 1953, a new musical by Johnny Burke and Jimmy Van Heusen was staged, “Carnival in Flanders”. Unfortunately, it was not successful. However, one of the songs, “Here’s that Rainy Day” became a standard on the cabaret scene.I have arranged this memorable song for solo trombone and brass band. It begins in a Latin style, then moves to the famous Jazz Big Band style. Good key players make the band parts playable by most bands – as long as they like to ‘swing’! The trombone part is not easy, on the other hand, neither is it aimed at the ‘select few’ virtuoso players. Impressive stuff though, with ‘written’ sections that sound like improvisation.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £35.00

    Ariel

    DescriptionAll hail, great master! Grave sir, hail! I comeTo answer thy best pleasure, be 't to fly,To swim, to dive into the fire, to rideOn the curled cloud. To thy strong bidding, taskAriel and all his quality.– William Shakespeare: The Tempest, Act 1, Scene 2Ariel was written for the Hammonds Band to open their programme at the 2019 Brass in Concert Championships at The Sage Concert Hall in Gateshead, where it received its premiere. The title is taken from the character in Shakespeare's play 'The Tempest'. Ariel is an immensely powerful "air spirit" or demon bound to serve Prospero, the exiled Duke of Milan, after being released by Prospero from imprisonment in a tree. In the play Ariel's magical abilities are used to help Prospero revenge himself on his enemies and reclaim his dukedom, whereupon Ariel finally regains his freedom.You can hear an audio preview and follow the score below:Performance notes:The cornets and horns are split into two "choirs" to be placed left and right of the band. It may be possible for the choirs to play their opening flourish offstage, and the optional repeated sections in the opening are to accommodate stage movement if required. Trombones form a third "choir" which should ideally stand centrally between basses and percussion, and the euphoniums and baritones should sit in front of the basses. The work requires four percussionists, although if four are not available the 2nd part may be omitted.Percussion 1: Kit – bass drum, snare, 3 x toms, hi-hat, suspended cymbal – and 3 x temple blocksPercussion 2: Tam tam and orchestral bass drum.Percussion 3: Glockenspiel and timpaniPercussion 4: Tubular bellsSoprano, solo cornets and 3rd cornets require cup mutes. Solo trombone requires a cup mute, second trombone requires a metal straight mute.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £60.00

    General Series Band Journal April 2014 Numbers 2130-2133

    No. 2130 Trombone Solo - Bless?d Assurance (William Himes)The well-known 19th Century gospel song of Fanny Crosby and Phoebe KNapp is given a fresh treatment in this relaxed samba for solo Trombone and band. No. 2131 Festival March - Diamond Jubilee (Stephen Bulla)Written to commemorate the 75th anniversary of Star Lake Music Camp, this quick march features the melody 'When the mists have rolled away' (T.B. 452)No. 2132 Chorus Setting - Sweet Spirit of Christ (Paul Drury)A simple, yet effective arrangement of the well-known prayer chorus, based on a traditional Maori melody by Paraire Tomoana.No. 2133 Song Arrangement - Hear Our Praises (Jeremy Smith)An up-tempo setting, by Jeremy Smith, of Reuben Moirgan's worship song.

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £70.00

    General Series Band Journal April 2013 Numbers 2119-2122

    No.2119 Guardian of my soul (Darren Shaw)This arrangement combines the composer's own song 'I worship you', with the well-known hymn 'O Jesus, I have promised' (S.A.S.B. 862), both of which contain the phrase, 'Guardian of my soul', within their lyrics.No.2120 Festival March - Temple 125 (Kevin Larsson)This march was written for the 125th anniversary of Bromley Temple, which is where the composer grew up and still considers his 'home corps'. This arrangement uses two songs that are closely associated with Bromley, the first being 'Jesus is all I need' (STTL Vol.1, part 1) by Hans Knutzen, who was a soldier of the corps and a member of the 'Bill Booth Revival Machine'. The second song is 'He came to give us life (T.B. 662) from the Gowans and Larsson musical, 'Jesus Folk', which was premiered using a cast from Bromley Temple.No.2121 Trombone Solo - Nothing but thy blood (Harold Burmayer)Donna Peterson's recent melody, set to the time-honoured words of Richard Slater, provides a vehicle for solo trombone with band accompaniment.No.2122 Begone, vain world (Michael Davis)A setting of the hymn tune of the same title, with which we associate the words, 'I want, dear Lord, a heart that's true and clean'.

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £98.00

    KirkFeld (Trombone Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Kirkhope, Grant - McKenzie, Jock

    Written for Ian Bousfield and the International Trombone Festival 2017. Grant Kirkhope is a BAFTA nominated British composer who has created the soundtrack for video games that have sold in excess of 30 million copies. From "GoldenEye" to "Banjo-Kazooie", "Viva Pinata" to "Donkey Kong", "Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning" to "Civilization: Beyond Earth" and "Perfect Dark" to "Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse". He has also recently scored the feature film "The King's Daughter" starring Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt and is currently working on "Yooka Laylee" and "Dropzone". Grant's score for "Viva Pinata" was nominated by BAFTA in the Original Score category in its 2007 awards. Grant is represented by the prestigious Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency by Cheryl Tiano and Kevin Korn. Grant has a degree in music from the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, where he majored in classical trumpet, is a green card holder and now lives in Agoura Hills, LA with his wife and two children. "Ian and I first met when we were around 15 years old. We both played in our county orchestra, the North Yorkshire Schools Symphony Orchestra (I was a trumpet player). I think we hit it off straight away, as we were definitely a couple of cheeky kids, if you know what I mean! We both ended up playing in Rowntree Mackintosh Brass Band for a while too which Ian's Dad, Trevor conducted. We bumped into each other again when we both went for the Shell/LSO Scholarship. I got to the area finals in Manchester so I was pretty pleased with myself but then I saw Ian and I knew it was all over! Of course Ian went on to win and the rest is history. I saw him again when I was attending the Royal Northern College of Music around 1983 by which time Ian had just got the principal chair at the Halle Orchestra. Then I guess 30 something years went by as we both went about our lives and lost touch. We re-kindled our friendship due to his wife really. She emailed me to say it was Ian's 50th birthday and she was collecting stories from all his friends over the years. After that we got back in touch and then one day on Facebook I got a message from him in typical dry Yorkshire fashion "now then Grant, I had a listen to your music and I think it's good, how about writing a piece for me ?" I was a little bit unsure at first but of course I loved Ian's playing and of course I said yes. Over a Skype call in 2016, he asked me what I thought I'd write. I said since I live in LA I'd like to write a "Hollywood" trombone piece. Imagine if John Williams had written a piece for solo trombone, that's what I'd like to write - well I'd certainly like to try" ??" Grant Kirkhope

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days