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  • £40.00

    I Will Always Love You - Ron Sebregts

    The title song to the 1992 film The Bodyguard, I Will Always Love You, written by Dolly Parton and sung by Whitney Houston spent over 10 weeks at number one in the UK charts. The beautiful ballad has been sensitively arrangement for brass band and is sure to be a big hit with both musicians and audiences.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £32.50

    The Covid Collection - Gavin Somerset

    This exciting new 22-minute concert suite for Brass Sextet has been composed during the months of lockdown charting the feelings of a nation, with seven movements playable by 6 (or more) players. The music was composed with the intention for players to perform either together live in a small group, in isolation by way of a virtual performance (downloadable backing tracks are available to play along to) and ultimately, to give players something to enjoy as we all miss our brass band families. This concert suite is the perfect addition to all bands' libraries at a time when rehearsals are limited. Several of the movements are already in preparation for a full band edition to be released at a later date: SPECIAL OFFER LAUNCH PRICE - THIS WEEK ONLY: ?32.50 (Standard RRP ?39.99) (also available as a digital download worldwide - purchase now & print to play). Bands purchasing this sextet edition will be eligible for a discount on the upcoming full brass band edition of the concert suite. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Movement 1: FANFARE: The Call of the Band - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK This opening fanfare gives way to a full of life and energy. With catchy melodies and harmonies, it is an effective opening to any concert programme and the perfect way to begin the Suite. Movement 2: March of the Antibodies - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK A cheeky little number that keeps on fighting though. Whilst not a March in the traditional brass band sense, players should aim to give a 'happy' performance of this movement ensuring smiles all around for both performers and the audience.Movement 3: Solidarity - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK The first slow movement of the concert suite aims to reflect on the isolation many of us felt during the time of lockdown. However, during these times, walks out with loved ones allowed many to connect and enjoy downtime, not often afforded to many. Movement 4: Lazy Days - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK A movement whose title really does say it all. A laid back swing number that should be played in an as relaxed manner, as possible!Movement 5: Hymn for Carers (Dedicated to the NHS & Care Workers) - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK Dedicated to the NHS & Care Workers, this hymn tune is filled with emotional highs and lows, felt by many of the hospital and care staff who worked tirelessly to keep our people safe, with a timely nod at the end to Vera Lynn & our missed VE day commemorations. Movement 6: Army of the Keyworkers - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK A stirring work in 12/8 which rightfully, depicts our heroes who kept the country moving through the most difficult of times. An heroic number for players to enjoy.Movement 7: CELEBRATION: Return of the Band - CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PLAYBACK TRACK Little needs to be said about this movement, as at this time of release, we cannot yet celebrate the return of all players to the band rooms across the country. However, when that time comes, this movement is to be played with the joy of normality we shall all feel. CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE FULL SUITE BACKING TRACK ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Each movement can be performed as a standalone item, or form part of the full 22-minute concert suite. Sextet scored for: x1 Cornet I in Bbx1 Cornet 2 in Bb1x Flugelhorn1x Tenor Horn in Eb1x Euphonium/Baritone in Bb1x Eb Bass*extra parts included are, Cornet parts in Eb & C, Horn in F, Euphonium/Baritone in BC, Trombone (TC and BC), BBb Bass in TC & Tuba in BC.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £62.80

    Bansull i advent - Trygve Hoff - Haakon Esplo

    The composer and musician Trygve Hoff was born and raised at Rognan in Nordland and gained a lot of inspiration for his texts from the North Norwegian culture. He is a composer and copywriter of many of our most popular songs. "Ei hand a holde i" and "Har en drom" with music by Svein Gundersen and especially his own "North Norwegian Christmas Psalm" are famous songs in Norway."Lullaby in advent" may not be among his most famous songs, but it's a beautiful and thoughtful melody that will fit well with any Christmas concert. Hoff himself varied with musical styles on this song. This arrangement is written as a jazz-version with swing feel.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £40.00

    Slavonic Rock March - David Well

    According to his teachers, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (1840-1893), was not particularly gifted. His special talents were acknowledged only in 1865 when he had been working for the Ministry of Finances for some years. In 1866 he was appointed teacher at the Conservatory and applied himself to composing. His oeuvre is fairly extensive and many of his compositions receive a high ranking on the international list of classical music, including his six symphonies, solo concertos (violin concerto and piano concertos), ballets (The Nut Cracker, Swan Lake), and his overtures (1812 and Romeo and Juliette). In 1893 Tchaikovsky died of Cholera after drinking a glass of infected water. His Slavonic March is a popular concert piece for symphonic orchestra that is still frequently performed in concert halls. David Well arranged the theme and created a contemporary march in rock style. Tchaikovsky once said to an unsatisfied teacher: 'I will be a great composer within 10 years time.'

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £34.95

    The Mansions of Glory - Score & Parts - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    The Mansions of Glory - Score Only - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £12.00

    Edward Gregson: The World Rejoicing

    Description**NOTE: PUBLICATION DATES – Band parts (and therefore also “full sets” for The World Rejoicing will now be published following the Spring Festival qualifying contest for the 2021 British Open Brass Band Championship, currently planned to take place in early May 2021. Exact publication date will be given nearer the time, once the Covid-19 situation is seen to have stabilised.Composer’s NoteIn searching for a common link between the brass band traditions of the various European countries that commissioned this work, I considered the fact that hymns have always played an important role in the relationship that brass bands have with their particular communities; and thus I turned to a well-known Lutheran chorale, Nun danket alle Gott (Now thank we all our God), written around 1636 by Martin Rinkart, with the melody attributed to Johann Cruger. A number of composers have incorporated this chorale into their music, most famously J.S.Bach in his Cantatas no. 79 and 192, and Mendelssohn in the Lobsegang movement of his 2nd Symphony (the harmonization of which is usually used when this hymn is sung).It seemed fitting therefore for me to return to a compositional form I have used many times before (Variations) and to write a work based on this hymn. I have used it in a similar way to that which I employed in my Variations on Laudate Dominum of 1976 - that is, rather than writing a set of variations using elaborations of the complete tune, I have taken various phrases from the chorale and used them within the context of other musical material, applying an overall symphonic process of continuous variation and development. The structure, or sub-divisions of the work, which is through composed and plays without a break, is as follows: Prelude, Capriccio, La Danza 1, Processional, La Danza 2, Arias and Duets, Fuga Burlesca, Chorale, and Postlude.The work is also partly autobiographical – in the manner say of Strauss's Ein Heldenleben – in that I have incorporated into the score brief quotations from many of my other major works for brass band. In that respect, The World Rejoicing sums up a particular facet of my life as a composer, and reflects the admiration I have always had for what is surely one of the great amateur music-making traditions in the world.The World Rejoicing is dedicated 'in loving memory of my brother', Bramwell Logan Gregson, who sadly passed away in the Autumn of 2018.Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £79.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score and Parts - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £39.95

    Malcolm Arnold Variations - Score Only - Martin Ellerby

    MALCOLM ARNOLD VARIATIONS was commissioned by Philip Biggs and Richard Franklin for the 20th All England Masters International Brass Band Championship held in the Corn Exchange, Cambridge on 25 May 2008. The work is dedicated to Anthony Day, long time carer of Sir Malcolm Arnold in his final years. I first met Malcolm and Anthony in 1990 and remained in constant touch until Malcolm’s passing in 2006. Anthony, of course, remains a friend and plays his own role subliminally in this piece. The work is not based on any of Malcolm Arnold’s own themes, rather it is a portrait of him (and by association Anthony Day) through my eyes and as a result of my friendship with both parties over some 18 years. If there is any theme as such it is the personalities of the players, the protagonist and his carer placed together by my own efforts coloured and influenced by aspects of Arnold’s style and technique without recourse to direct quotation but through allusion and parody. It is of course designed as a brass band test piece but in my eyes is first and foremost a musical challenge. The pyrotechnical elements are there but always secondary to the musical thrust of the work’s structure. I have long beforehand submerged myself in Malcolm Arnold’s music and ultimately delivered this tribute. Music Directors will be advised to acquaint themselves with the composer’s personal music, particularly the film scores, symphonies, concertos and ballets: the solutions towards a successful interpretation of my piece are all in there – and YES, I want, and sanction, this piece to be interpreted, and therein lies the challenge for those of you ‘up front’! The challenge for players is that of virtuosity, ensemble and careful attention to where they are individually in relation to their colleagues – a question of balance, taste and insight. With regard to tempi, as is my usual custom, I have indicated all metronome marks with the prefix circa. I would suggest that the fast music is played at these tempos but that the more rubato moments can be allowed some freedom in expression and fluidity of line. With regard to the type of mutes to be employed – this decision I leave to the discretion of players and conductors. Structurally the work is cast as an Introduction, 20 Variations and a Finale. Some variations are self contained, others run into each other as sequences in the same tempo. In other variations, segments are repeated and developed. I could describe the overall concept as a miniature ballet or a condensed film score – there is much drama and character and the repeated elements assist this in driving the action forward. I have deliberately avoided the more extremely dark qualities of Malcolm’s own music in this, my celebration of this master-composer, as I have always viewed (and evidenced by my previous Masters scores Tristan Encounters and Chivalry) that the Cambridge contest is a ‘sunshine- affair’ and firmly believe that Malcolm Arnold would have had it no other way too!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    Four Etudes (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    This work was written during August and September 2016. In it, I wanted primarily to explore the elements of timbre, rhythm, texture and colour. The first three ?tudes (or studies) are based on a set of piano pieces I composed in 1982, whilst the last, the longest of the set, was composed specially. My reference point was the Four ?tudes for orchestra of 1928 by Stravinsky, a work I have always admired, and of which the first three also happen to be based on a set of earlier pieces, in his case for string quartet, with the last being a re-arrangement of a work for pianola. I have also borrowed the titles he gave to the individual studies as they seemed to fit the mood of my pieces.However, the exception is the final study, where instead of the exuberant mood of his colourful portrayal of Madrid, mine was influenced by the terrible human tragedy that was unfolding in Aleppo at the time I was writing it, and thus reflects the violence and barbarism of those events; yet towards the end it does offer a glimmer of hope for humanity with a return to the Canticle (Song) of the first study, and concludes quietly with the chords and bells that began the work. The titles of the ?tudes are Canticle, Dance, Excentrique, and Aleppo. Like Stravinsky’s, the set is relatively short, lasting around 8 minutes.The Four ?tudes were commissioned by Black Dyke Band and were written specially for the recording marking the conclusion of my year as Composer-in-Residence. The concert premiere will be given by Black Dyke Band, conducted by the composer, at the RNCM Festival of Brass in January 2017.- Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days