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  • £10.00

    Endurance

    DescriptionMen wanted for hazardous journey.Small wages, bitter cold,long months of complete darkness,constant danger, safe return doubtful.Honour and recognition in case of success.– Ernest Shackleton, 4 Burlington StreetEndurance takes its title from the ship used by Sir Ernest Shackleton's Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition in 1914-15. After many months of fundraising (and reputedly running the above advert in The Times) the Endurance set sail from Plymouth on 6 August 1914. Whilst at sea news of the outbreak of war led Shackleton to put his ship and crew at the disposal of the Admiralty, but their services were not required and they were encouraged to continue. On October 26 1914 they left Grytviken on South Georgia for the Antarctic continent, hoping to find the pack ice shrinking in the Antarctic spring. Two days later, however, they encountered unseasonable ice which slowed their progress considerably. On 15 January 2015, when Endurance was only 200 miles from her intended landfall at Vahsel Bay, the ship became beset by ice which had been compressed against the land to the south by gale force winds. Trapped in the ice of the Weddell Sea, the ship spent the Antarctic winter driven by the weather further from her intended destination until, on 21 November 1915 Endurance broke up forcing the crew to abandon ship and set up camp on the ice at a site they named "Patience Camp".The crew spent several weeks on the ice. As the southern spring started to reduce the extent of the ice shelf they took to their three lifeboats, sailing across the open ocean to reach the desolate and uninhabited Elephant Island. There they used two of the boats to build a makeshift shelter while Shackleton and five others took the largest boat, an open lifeboat named the 'James Caird' and sailed it for 800 terrifyingly dangerous miles across the vast and lonely Southern Atlantic to South Georgia – a journey now widely regarded as one of the greatest and most heroic small-boat journeys ever undertaken. After landing on the wrong side of the island and having to climb over a mountain range in the dark with no map, Shackleton and his companions finally stumbled back into the Grytviken whaling station on 19 May 1916.After resting very briefly to recover his strength, Shackleton then began a relentless campaign to beg or borrow a ship to rescue the rest of his crew from Elephant Island; whaling ships were not strong enough to enter polar ice, but on 30 August 1916, over two years after their departure from Plymouth, Shackleton finally returned to Elephant Island aboard a steam tug borrowed from the Chilean government. Although some were in poor health, every member of the Endurance crew was rescued and returned home alive.Endurance is dedicated to the memory of my mum, who passed away in September 2017.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £34.99

    Shackleton's Cross (Cornet Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Goodall, Howard - Hall, Daniel

    Shackleton's Cross was inspired by a painting created in 1957 by the English artist Edward Seago (1910 1974). The title refers to a cross which was erected to the memory of Sir Ernest Shackleton, who led a number of explorations to the Antarctic. Shackleton died in 1922 whilst on a Polar expedition, and the cross can be found on a promontory at the entrance to the bay at Grytviken Whaling Station in South Georgia. The painting is owned by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, and was part of an exhibition at Buckingham Palace from October 2011 to April 2012. Originally scored for oboe, trumpet and small orchestra, Daniel Hall's sensitive arrangement for trumpet or cornet and brass band follows the composer's alternative version for solo trumpet and organ, created for Crispian Steele-Perkins (trumpet) and David Goode (organ). Duration: 5.00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £55.00

    Purcell Variations - Kenneth Downie

    Purcell Variations, composed in 1995, the year of the tercentenary of the death of the great English composer, was a watershed work in that it was Downie's first extended composition to be published independently of The Salvation Army and intended for wider use. For his theme, Downie has chosen what has come down to us as the hymn tune Westminster Abbey, which is in fact an adaptation made in 1842 by Ernest Hawkins, who was a Canon of Westminster Abbey where Purcell himself had been organist. Purcell’s original is actually the closing section of an anthem, O God, Thou art my God, where it provides the final paean of praise, sung to repeated ‘Hallelujahs’. Purcell’s tune, particularly the opening triadic gesture, is used as a source of thematic and harmonic material – a quarry for ideas if you like: “I was obsessed with the intervals of thirds in Purcell’s tune, rather like Brahms in his Third Symphony”, the composer says.There are five variations, preceded by an extended introduction and theme. In the first variation, Purcell’s lilting dance pulse has been transformed into a bright, playful sequence, in which each phrase of the melody is given its own transformation. In the second, Purcell’s opening gambit is extended into a graceful, flowing waltz, featuring solo and first horn at the top of the register. The composer offers a range of metronome speeds in this movement, in which he is emulating the wistful elegance of Erik Satie’s famous Gymnopedie. We enter the world of big band jazz in variation three, where Purcell’s tune strides along with added syncopation and bluesy major/minor thirds to the fore. After the breathless energy and blazing brass of the big band, Downie moves into his ‘home territory’ for a beautifully worked lyrical variation. There is an enhanced urgency about the final variation, which opens with an extended reprise of the work’s introduction. Purcell’s second and third phrases provide the preparation for the exuberant return, in customary triumph of Purcell’s ‘Hallelujah’.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £35.20

    Salute to Berne - Ernst Obrecht

    Ernest Obrecht has been a leading figure in the Swiss brass band scene for many years. In traditional form, this march contains a uniquely Swiss flavour.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £72.00

    Life on Mars - Bowie David - Droste Ernest

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £26.00
  • £118.00
  • £100.00

    Exodus Suite - GOLD, Ernest (Arr.: Jiri Kabat / Bertrand Moren)

    Theme From Exodus / Fight For Survival / Valley Of Jezreel / Hatikvah

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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