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  • £56.90
  • £72.00

    Life on Mars - Bowie David - Droste Ernest

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.99

    Shackleton's Cross - Howard Goodall

    Shackleton s Cross was inspired by a painting created in 1957 by the English artist Edward Seago (1910 1974). The title refers to a cross which was erected to the memory of Sir Ernest Shackleton, who led a number of explorations to the Antarctic. Shackleton died in 1922 whilst on a Polar expedition, and the cross can be found on a promontory at the entrance to the bay at Grytviken Whaling Station in South Georgia. The painting is owned by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, and was part of an exhibition at Buckingham Palace from October 2011 to April 2012.Originally scored for oboe, trumpet and small orchestra, Daniel Hall s sensitive arrangement for trumpet or cornet and brass band follows the composer s alternative version for solo trumpet and organ, created for Crispian Steele-Perkins (trumpet) and David Goode (organ).

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £74.95

    Amundsen - Jonathan Bates

    DURATION: 14'00". DIFFICULTY: 1st+. 'Amundsen' was commissioned by rskog Brass, Norway for their winning performance at the 2020 Norwegian National Championships held at the Grieghallen in Bergen. In December 1911, Norwegian Roald Amundsen gained global fame by becoming the first explorer to lead a team to the geographic South Pole. Amundsen and 4 other members of his team arrived 5 weeks ahead of a rival team from the UK led by Robert Falcon Scott, all of which perished on their attempted return from the pole. Initially when Amundsen's team set out in 1910, they were under the impression that they would be making the far shorter journey to the arctic drift to attempt to reach the North Pole, but Amundsen had received news that American explorers Peary and Cook had beaten them to this goal, and so Amundsen's focus changed southward. 'Fram, Forward' - 'Fram' (translating to English as "forward") was the name of the ship Amundsen used for this particular polar expedition. Amundsen had only informed 2 people of his real intentions of conquering the South Pole when the ship first left port in Kristiansand before heading south to the Portuguese island of Madeira in the Atlantic Ocean. After weeks at sea - causing the uninformed members of the crew to raise a number of questions and produce a general feel of uncertainty and low spirits - it was here that Amundsen announced his true plans to the rest of his crew. They were asked whether they wished to continue with their expedition, to which all - some begrudgingly - agreed to sail on to the South Pole, through the great Ice Barrier before docking in the Bay of Whales on the Ross Ice Shelf. 'Ross Ice Shelf' - Upon Amundsen's arrival in the Bay of Whales, the team were greeted by the sight of the enormous ice plateau's and glaciers, towering into the Antarctic sky. In 1907, Ernest Shackleton had attempted - and failed - to reach the South Pole, but his route and mapping was by now well documented. Scott and the UK team were to follow this route, whereas Amundsen and his men forged their own way to the pole through unchartered territory and deadly terrain littered with deep crevasses and canyons. The music here though, is a picture of tranquility. The eerie silence of total emptiness with only the heavy snow falling around Amundsen as Fram and the Bay of Whales disappears into the distance, faced by the maginute of the expedition ahead. 'Advance to Polheim' - The first new challenge Amundsen discovered on this route was a rough, sharp and extremely steep glacier (which was later named the Axel heiberg Glacier after the Norwegian monarch who funded much of the expedition), which would take his team up from sea level to an altitude of over 9,000ft in just 20 miles, with most of this over just 7 miles. Once scaled, only the vast Antarctic Plateau stood between Amundsen and the pole. Here the race began, with only one aim - victory for himself, his team, and for the whole of Norway. .

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £24.95

    Taps in Tempo - Jan Berenska - Rodney Newton

    This piece was written for the Welsh percussionist Leslie Lewis. Born in the Rhondda Valley, Lewis became a pupil of the legendary Ernest Parsons, timpanist and founder member of the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra, a member of the instrument manufacturing family of E.A. Parsons & Company and an internationally-renowned authority on timpani and percussion. Lewis joined Parsons in the CBSO, becoming principal percussionist and later he was appointed solo percussionist with the BBC Theatre Orchestra in London. Sadly, the very morning he was to take up his new appointment, he stepped off the Birmingham train at Euston station, suffered a heart attack and died there and then on the platform - a tragic end to a promising career. Also Available with Fanfare Band accompaniment - Visit the PVM Fanfare Band Catalogue

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £39.95

    Taps in Tempo - Jan Nerneska - Rodney Newton

    Despite his European name, Jan Berenska was a Midlander and something of a youthful prodigy, playing piano, violin and cello and giving his first broadcast at the age of 15 from Station 5IT (based in Witton, near Birmingham) in the days of crystal sets. He made his professional debut as a multi-instrumentalist in 1919, playing in the pit at London's Drury Lane Theatre for a pantomime. In the 1920s, he became sub-leader of the fledgling City of Birmingham Orchestra (CBO) before forming his own Berenska Pianoforte Quintette in 1930, which broadcast regularly from the BBC'S Birmingham studios. In 1935, he formed a dance band which toured all over the country.His xylophone solo, Taps in Tempo, is dedicated to Leslie Lewis, principal percussionist of the CBO. Born in South Wales, Lewis was a prot?g? of the orchestra's legendary timpanist, Ernest Parsons, and was subsequently engaged by the BBC as percussionist with its Theatre Orchestra in London, only to die tragically of a heart attack at Euston Station on the day he was to take up his new appointment.Taps in Tempo is very typical of the type of xylophone solo heard on innumerable bandstands and in caf?s and variety theatres throughout the 1930s and 1940s. It features a bright, catchy melody, dazzling arpeggios and scales and four-mallet chords to show off the xylophonist's technique. This arrangement was specially created for the virtuoso percussionist, Simone Rebello.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.99

    Shackleton's Cross (Cornet Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Goodall, Howard - Hall, Daniel

    Shackleton's Cross was inspired by a painting created in 1957 by the English artist Edward Seago (1910 1974). The title refers to a cross which was erected to the memory of Sir Ernest Shackleton, who led a number of explorations to the Antarctic. Shackleton died in 1922 whilst on a Polar expedition, and the cross can be found on a promontory at the entrance to the bay at Grytviken Whaling Station in South Georgia. The painting is owned by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, and was part of an exhibition at Buckingham Palace from October 2011 to April 2012. Originally scored for oboe, trumpet and small orchestra, Daniel Hall's sensitive arrangement for trumpet or cornet and brass band follows the composer's alternative version for solo trumpet and organ, created for Crispian Steele-Perkins (trumpet) and David Goode (organ). Duration: 5.00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £55.00

    Purcell Variations - Kenneth Downie

    Purcell Variations, composed in 1995, the year of the tercentenary of the death of the great English composer, was a watershed work in that it was Downie's first extended composition to be published independently of The Salvation Army and intended for wider use. For his theme, Downie has chosen what has come down to us as the hymn tune Westminster Abbey, which is in fact an adaptation made in 1842 by Ernest Hawkins, who was a Canon of Westminster Abbey where Purcell himself had been organist. Purcell’s original is actually the closing section of an anthem, O God, Thou art my God, where it provides the final paean of praise, sung to repeated ‘Hallelujahs’. Purcell’s tune, particularly the opening triadic gesture, is used as a source of thematic and harmonic material – a quarry for ideas if you like: “I was obsessed with the intervals of thirds in Purcell’s tune, rather like Brahms in his Third Symphony”, the composer says.There are five variations, preceded by an extended introduction and theme. In the first variation, Purcell’s lilting dance pulse has been transformed into a bright, playful sequence, in which each phrase of the melody is given its own transformation. In the second, Purcell’s opening gambit is extended into a graceful, flowing waltz, featuring solo and first horn at the top of the register. The composer offers a range of metronome speeds in this movement, in which he is emulating the wistful elegance of Erik Satie’s famous Gymnopedie. We enter the world of big band jazz in variation three, where Purcell’s tune strides along with added syncopation and bluesy major/minor thirds to the fore. After the breathless energy and blazing brass of the big band, Downie moves into his ‘home territory’ for a beautifully worked lyrical variation. There is an enhanced urgency about the final variation, which opens with an extended reprise of the work’s introduction. Purcell’s second and third phrases provide the preparation for the exuberant return, in customary triumph of Purcell’s ‘Hallelujah’.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days