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  • £86.00

    Scottish Dances - Peter Martin - Menno Haantjes

    Scottish Dances is based on three Scottish traditionals: Cock of the North, The Bonnie Bank's O'Loch Lomond and Marie's Wedding. I. Cock of the North's name is used for multiple things or events. For example for a locomotive to a famous, it seems, delicious liqueur, and rallies to snowboard competitions. Furthermore is "Cock O' the North " a nickname of a famous Duke. (The 4th Duke of Gordon). In this composition Cock of the North (a Jig) is a traditional Scottish bagpipe tune, regularly played on tattoos by Pipe Bands. Not infrequently the drummers sing the text. Auntie Mary, had a canary, Up the leg of her trousers While she was sleeping I was peeping Up the leg of her trousers. II. " The Bonnie Bank's O'Loch Lomond " is about a sad story that took place during an revolt against the British. In 1745 Bonnie Prince Charlie had to retreat. Two of his men were captured. One was convicted and executed, while the other was released. The spirit of the executed soldier would arrive in Scotland via the 'low road' (underworld) before his companion, who had still a long way to go. You'll take the high road And I'll take the low road And I'll be in Scotland afore ye But me and my true love will never meet again On the Bonnie Bonnie Banks of Loch Lomond III. In a Scottish wedding, after the official ceremonies, there is often danced. This is called a ceilidh. For this we use traditional Scottish music such as "Marie's Wedding '. Mid dance we go back to the church, where a lovely song in honor of the couple sounds. Marie's Wedding has been recorded by Van Morrison (among many others). Step we gaely, on we go, heel for heel and toe for toe Arm and arm and on we go, all for Marie's wedding

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £50.00

    Brilliant Beatles

    There have been many arrangements of Beatles' songs for various kinds of ensembles, so rather than just producing a further medley of Beatles' hits, Peter Kleine Schaars has added a new twist to them with this excellent new work. All You Need Is Love and With a Little Help from my Friends pass by in a swing march, Michelle sounds like a newly composed ballad and When I'm Sixty Four is played in Dixie swing style. A Hard Day's Night is transformed into a funk theme with a samba interlude, Let It Be into a slow march, and Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da in a rock beat. Experience The Beatles as you have never heard them before.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days
  • £95.00

    Battle Symphony, The - Beethoven, L. van

    I used this for many many outdoor concerts with Fodens and Desford, and most memorably (for me) at one of my Royal Albert Hall Gala Concerts with a light show, full battle scenes with muskets, cannons and competing English and French Fanfare Trumpets. It needs a few extra cornets/trumpets for the warring fanfares and a couple of extra percussionists for the louder effects. Audiences love it, especially with the background to the Napoleonic Wars filled in, the madness and the badness of so-called 'great' men. Duration: 12 minutes approximately, according to repeats.Other products you may be interested in...TitleComposer/AuthorCategory/ScoringPriceAdagio (from Sonata Pathetique)Beethoven, L. van?27.50Allegro con brio: FINALE from 7th SymphonyBeethoven, L. van?45.00Beethoven's BeanoWarlock?22.50

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
    Buy from Wobbleco Music

    Anyone Who Had A Heart - Burt Bacharach and Hal David - Len Jenkins

    "Anyone Who Had A Heart" is a song written by Burt Bacharach (music) and Hal David (lyrics) originally for Dionne Warwick in 1963. However, in the UK, Ireland and New Zealand, the cover version by Cilla Black was, and is still, the best loved. Championed by her friends The Beatles, she began her career as a singer in 1963, and her singles "Anyone Who Had A Heart" and "You're My World" both reached number one in the UK in 1964. From the first line, the song has a certain frisson: "Anyone who ever loved, could look at me, and know that I love you." Sadly, Cilla passed away on 1 August 2015 so this is our tribute to a well-loved lady and singer. Our objective has been to interpret the style of the original performance by Cilla, and whilst the time signatures may not be familiar, experience has shown that these are easier to read and play than the alternative using triplets.