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  • £57.51

    A Renaissance Christmas (Brass Band) Kevin Norbury

    VIEW SCORE PDF This magnificent festive suite was written by Kevin Norbury for the Pierre Elliott Trudeau High School Wind Symphony and features several well known carols set in a Renaissance style. Here it has been set for brass band. Three contrasting movements comprise the work: i. Processional (Personent hodie - On this day earth shall ring) This is a short piece imagining a torchlight Yuletide procession (perhaps bearing the traditional roasted wild boar), using a well-known Christmas melody from the large collection of music compiled in the 16th century called Piae Cantiones (1582). The tune is presented twice with accompanying, related melodic material. ii. Pastorale (Quem pastores laudavere - Shepherds sang their praises o'er him) This is a 14th-century melody which was originally collected by Michael Praetorius at the end of the 16th-century. The treatment throughout is very lyrical without overly complex harmonies. The melody is heard three times with brief linking episodes and a short coda. iii. Celebration! (In dulci jubilo - In sweet celebration - Ding-dong merrily on high)) This magnificent 13th-century melody was also a part of Michael Praetorius's collection. It is traditional associated with the words 'Good Christian men, rejoice!' The opening is a straight transcription of the great chorale prelude for organ by J.S.Bach. After the grandeur of the opening, the tune is heard in more of a 'folky' style. A lot of related melodic material is then presented before the tune Ding-dong merrily on high is heard. After another episode of previously used music In dulci jubilo reappears in a joyful conclusion to the piece. Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.solidbrassmusic.com Difficulty Level: 3rd Section + Instrumentation: Soprano Cornet Eb Solo Cornet Bb Repiano Cornet Bb 2nd Cornet Bb 3rd Cornet Bb Flugel Horn Bb Solo Horn Eb 1st Horn Eb 2nd Horn Eb 1st Baritone Bb 2nd Baritone Bb 1st Trombone Bb 2nd Trombone Bb Bass Trombone Euphonium Bb Bass Eb Bass Bb Percussion 1-4

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £69.95

    Trombone Concerto (Trombone Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wiffin, Rob

    My Trombone Concerto was commissioned by Brett Baker following an earlier piece I had written for him called Shout! It was composed in Spain in the summer of 2010. Once I started writing I realised that this concerto was inevitably going to draw on my own experiences as a trombone player.The first movement was really a matter of getting the right thematic ideas and balancing the tutti and solo passages so, for formal structure, I studied the Gordon Jacob Trombone Concerto. There is a lyrical section preceding the first Allegro that owes much in spirit (but not in the actual music) to The Eternal Quest, Ray Steadman-Allen's Salvation Army solo.The slow movement seemed determined to come out in the vein of a Richard Strauss song. I wanted to write something ineluctably 'cantabile' as we trombone players rarely get a chance to play the melody. There is a brief allusion to that wonderful moment when the trombone gets to sing above the orchestra in Sibelius' seventh symphony. Arthur Wilson, that great exponent of the singing style in trombone-playing and my teacher at college died in the summer of 2010 so it seemed appropriate to dedicate this movement to him.The last movement is the lightest of the three in style and is slightly jazz-inflected, hopefully providing some fun for the soloist.While wanting to test the instrument I did not set out with the intention of making the concerto difficult but there are undoubtedly challenges of technique, range and style to be met by the soloist.- Rob Wiffin

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

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  • £34.95

    Trombone Concerto (Trombone Solo with Brass Band - Score only) - Wiffin, Rob

    My Trombone Concerto was commissioned by Brett Baker following an earlier piece I had written for him called Shout! It was composed in Spain in the summer of 2010. Once I started writing I realised that this concerto was inevitably going to draw on my own experiences as a trombone player. The first movement was really a matter of getting the right thematic ideas and balancing the tutti and solo passages so, for formal structure, I studied the Gordon Jacob Trombone Concerto. There is a lyrical section preceding the first Allegro that owes much in spirit (but not in the actual music) to The Eternal Quest, Ray Steadman-Allen's Salvation Army solo. The slow movement seemed determined to come out in the vein of a Richard Strauss song. I wanted to write something ineluctably 'cantabile' as we trombone players rarely get a chance to play the melody. There is a brief allusion to that wonderful moment when the trombone gets to sing above the orchestra in Sibelius' seventh symphony. Arthur Wilson, that great exponent of the singing style in trombone-playing and my teacher at college died in the summer of 2010 so it seemed appropriate to dedicate this movement to him. The last movement is the lightest of the three in style and is slightly jazz-inflected, hopefully providing some fun for the soloist. While wanting to test the instrument I did not set out with the intention of making the concerto difficult but there are undoubtedly challenges of technique, range and style to be met by the soloist.- Rob Wiffin

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £40.00

    Sinfonietta (Score only) - James Curnow

    Sinfonietta for Brass Band is basically a short symphony in three movements. The maestoso opening of the first movement introduces the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic material from which the entire work is structured. The first movement, allegro vivace, is a brilliant capriccio built upon two contrasting melodic lines that are developed throughout the movement. The form is sonata-allegro and it creates an atmosphere of energy and drive. The percussion section opens the second movement and presents the underlying rhythmic ostinato on which this brief but expressive siciliano (pastorale) is developed. Movement three is a rollicking rondo that challenges the technical and rhythmic control of the whol;e ensemble. The brilliant closing fanfare is based on material which has been developed in all three movements.

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £50.00

    Sinfonietta (Parts only) - James Curnow

    Sinfonietta for Brass Band is basically a short symphony in three movements. The maestoso opening of the first movement introduces the melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic material from which the entire work is structured. The first movement, allegro vivace, is a brilliant capriccio built upon two contrasting melodic lines that are developed throughout the movement. The form is sonata-allegro and it creates an atmosphere of energy and drive. The percussion section opens the second movement and presents the underlying rhythmic ostinato on which this brief but expressive siciliano (pastorale) is developed. Movement three is a rollicking rondo that challenges the technical and rhythmic control of the whol;e ensemble. The brilliant closing fanfare is based on material which has been developed in all three movements.

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £12.00

    Edward Gregson: The World Rejoicing

    Description**NOTE: PUBLICATION DATES – Band parts (and therefore also “full sets” for The World Rejoicing will now be published on 1 May 2021. The rights to the premiere performances in all five commissioning countries remain with the commissioning contests and bands are requested to respect these rights.Composer’s NoteIn searching for a common link between the brass band traditions of the various European countries that commissioned this work, I considered the fact that hymns have always played an important role in the relationship that brass bands have with their particular communities; and thus I turned to a well-known Lutheran chorale, Nun danket alle Gott (Now thank we all our God), written around 1636 by Martin Rinkart, with the melody attributed to Johann Cruger. A number of composers have incorporated this chorale into their music, most famously J.S.Bach in his Cantatas no. 79 and 192, and Mendelssohn in the Lobsegang movement of his 2nd Symphony (the harmonization of which is usually used when this hymn is sung).It seemed fitting therefore for me to return to a compositional form I have used many times before (Variations) and to write a work based on this hymn. I have used it in a similar way to that which I employed in my Variations on Laudate Dominum of 1976 - that is, rather than writing a set of variations using elaborations of the complete tune, I have taken various phrases from the chorale and used them within the context of other musical material, applying an overall symphonic process of continuous variation and development. The structure, or sub-divisions of the work, which is through composed and plays without a break, is as follows: Prelude, Capriccio, La Danza 1, Processional, La Danza 2, Arias and Duets, Fuga Burlesca, Chorale, and Postlude.The work is also partly autobiographical – in the manner say of Strauss's Ein Heldenleben – in that I have incorporated into the score brief quotations from many of my other major works for brass band. In that respect, The World Rejoicing sums up a particular facet of my life as a composer, and reflects the admiration I have always had for what is surely one of the great amateur music-making traditions in the world.The World Rejoicing is dedicated 'in loving memory of my brother', Bramwell Logan Gregson, who sadly passed away in the Autumn of 2018.Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £12.00

    The World Rejoicing (Brass Band - Study Score) - Gregson, Edward

    In searching for a common link between the brass band traditions of the various European countries that commissioned this work, I considered the fact that hymns have always played an important role in the relationship that brass bands have with their particular communities; and thus I turned to a well-known Lutheran chorale, Nun danket alle Gott (Now thank we all our God), written around 1636 by Martin Rinkart, with the melody attributed to Johann Cr?ger. A number of composers have incorporated this chorale into their music, most famously J.S.Bach in his Cantatas no. 79 and 192, and Mendelssohn in the Lobsegang movement of his 2nd Symphony (the harmonization of which is usually used when this hymn is sung).It seemed fitting therefore for me to return to a compositional form I have used many times before (Variations) and to write a work based on this hymn. I have used it in a similar way to that which I employed in my Variations on Laudate Dominum of 1976 – that is, rather than writing a set of variations using elaborations of the complete tune, I have taken various phrases from the chorale and used them within the context of other musical material, applying an overall symphonic process of continuous variation and development. The structure, or sub-divisions of the work, which is through composed and plays without a break, is as follows: Prelude, Capriccio, La Danza 1, Processional, La Danza 2, Arias and Duets, Fuga Burlesca, Chorale, and Postlude.The work is also partly autobiographical – in the manner say of Strauss’s Ein Heldenleben – in that I have incorporated into the score brief quotations from many of my other major works for brass band. In that respect, The World Rejoicing sums up a particular facet of my life as a composer, and reflects the admiration I have always had for what is surely one of the great amateur music-making traditions in the world.The World Rejoicing is dedicated ‘in loving memory of my brother’, Bramwell Logan Gregson, who sadly passed away in the Autumn of 2018.Edward Gregson

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £29.95

    Judd: Christmas Presence - Sharman, Paul

    Written for Birmingham Citadel Band to play at their annual carol concert at Symphony Hall, Birmingham, this piece tells the story of the Nativity using the carols ‘Who is he?’ and ‘Calypso Carol’ (Christmas Collection 16). Brief appearances are made by the shepherds (‘While shepherds watched’), the angels (‘Ding dong! merrily on high’) and the wise men (‘Three kings’ march’ and ‘We three kings of Orient are’). The music finishes with a majestic setting of the chorus of ‘Who is he?’, reminding us who the baby Jesus is:‘Tis the Lord! O wondrous story,‘Tis the Lord, the king of Glory!At his feet we humbly fall,Crown him, crown him Lord of all!

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days