Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 5 matches for your search

Results

  • £29.95

    Cafe 1719 - Jonathan Bates

    DURATION: 2'30". DIFFICULTY: 1st Section+. 'Caf 1719' was composed for the Wantage Silver Band as part of their entertainment contest sets based on the music of Johann Sebastian Bach in 2019. This particular short, jazz-inspired work is composed in tribute to the great French Pianist Jacques Loussier (1934-2019) who received global acclaim for his jazz interpretations of Bach's music, along with many other classical composers. Despite being born in the same year and living in the same country, Bach and Handel never actually met, but what if they had? Cafe 1917 acts as a musical meeting point - in a fictional Jazz Cafe by the Rhine, with the tenor horn section performing a 'Loussier-esque' version of Bach's 'Prelude No.2 in C Minor' whilst on the other side of the cafe, the trombone section follow suit with their take on Handel's 'Bourree from Music for the Royal Fireworks'. Eventually the two meet, share ideas and incorporate them into each other's melodies. Amongst the 2 main featured works by Bach and Handel, the tutti interludes are constructed on music from Bach's 'Toccata and Fugue in D Minor'. .

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £49.95

    Blaze - Phil Lawrence

    Cornet/trumpet sounds have been changing for some years; they are becoming heavier, more robust, slower vibratos. The dynamic level now pushed out by your average solo cornet is 30% more than it was some 35/40 years ago. This, is mainly due to the bore size of instruments and mouthpiece sizes (as in bigger), and, demands of modern day works for band on the player/soloist, and of course a greater demand of styles on the player, and progressive teaching methods. The technical styles in Blaze are about these changes.In Blaze I have clearly blended symphonic blowing styles of the trumpet plus the virtuosic attributes of today's modern cornet player. Many solo cornets parts (more past than present) in band are often clearly defined between low A and top C above the stave. Orchestral trumpet players need a working range of another fourth at either end of this defined range; I have incorporated this range into the concerto. The low register is much explored, and the average tessitura throughout is constantly varied below and above the stave from pedal Eb to super F# opt. The ideology of this blend of course makes sense as the original dedication is to Rod Franks, LSO, and of course blending with that is Rod's history at Black Dyke Mills Band.The concerto is ten minutes long and in one movement comprising of four sections and one solo cadenza, with one section only appearing once, an episode. This singular section was a revised addition and dedicated to Richard Marshall who gave the first premier in New Zealand in June 2003. For the purists the form is thus, A, B, A (vari), C (episode). D (slow movement), E (3/8 episode 1), D (vari), E, (episode 2). A (last move), B, A (developed) = (coda finale).The compositional style? Well, I hope quintessentially, 21st C English with an element of nostalgia (modal/old English). There are some hints at jazz playing styles and rhumba, but romantic English I would say, and especially the slow movement.Blaze is also very bold; the title itself reflects this, full of bravura and constant amazement, offering little respite for the soloist and sapping much stamina. The opening statement from the soloist is without accompaniment; just as a matador stands alone in the ring for the first few seconds, and looks at the mass crowd in defiance, he thinks, "you are here to see me die", so the soloist stares the audience back in the face, and opens with the richest, largest sound (not loudest) one can muster, thus throwing the gauntlet down to the ears of all who might disbelieve what they are about to encounter, a gladiatorial cornet, a Blaze from the stage.For the soloist, it is a non-stop Blaze of sound, electrifying technique, sage-like musicianship, super-human stamina and sheer matador-like bravura with 10th Dan mastery of over-all control, a test beyond the reasonable. And for the audience? Of course, a BLAZE never to be forgotten. Phil LawrenceThis work can be heard performed by cornet soloist Richard Marshall & the Grimethorpe Colliery Band on their award winning album entitled 'BLAZE'

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £30.00

    Russian Rag - George L Cobb, Sandy Coffin

    Interpolating the world famous"Prelude" by RachmaninoffCommissioned by John Wallace, this arrangement of Russian Rag has been crafted by Sandy Coffin through close listening of the available recordings of the Harlem Hellfighters Band. Sandy had been heavily involved with the Historic Brass Society symposium 2017 held in New York and assisted John with his research on this fascinating band and the style of music it generated.Eye-witness accounts refer to the 369th band ‘dancing’ rather than ‘marching’. Above all, in modern performance, finding a ‘dancing beat’ is crucial to a successful performance of this Ragtime march in order to do justice to the great pioneering work of James Reese Europe. Note the cheeky virtuosity and rubato!Look and Listen (courtesy of Tullis Russell Mills Band):Background to the Harlem HellfightersThe US Army 369th Regiment, made up largely of African-Americans from New York, became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because of the heroic reputation which accrued to them during the actions they engaged in during the First World War in Europe.James Reese Europe was one of the most active African-American composer/musical directors in the pre-war American music scene. The legendary Harlem Hellfighters Band, which he assembled in 1917 from African-American and Puerto Rican musicians, came at an important transitional point in musical history. A new form of music called jazz was emerging from Ragtime and the performing style of Europe’s band was immersed in the flow of this new direction.Europe’s Harlem Hellfighters influenced and inspired everyone who heard them, including the welcoming crowd when they disembarked in France, bowled over by their swinging rendition of La Marseillaise. Reese Europe became a war hero, commanding a machine-gun unit as well as the band.On return from War in 1919 the band led a ticker-tape parade along Fifth Avenue in New York and soon made about 30 shellac recordings. These recordings display some of the fingerprints of their performing style: ragging, improvising, muting, wailing, smearing (their word for glissando) – and from the evidence of their recordings they took the printed page as a blueprint for individuality.In May 1919 during the Hellfighters’ triumphant coast-to-coast tour after their return, James Reese Europe was tragically murdered, bringing to premature close, at the age of 39, the work of a great musical innovator.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £30.00

    That Moaning Trombone - Carl D Bethel, Sandy Coffin

    Comic March One-StepCommissioned by John Wallace, this arrangement of That Moaning Trombone has been crafted by Sandy Coffin through close listening of the available recordings of the Harlem Hellfighters Band. Sandy had been heavily involved with the Historic Brass Society symposium 2017 held in New York and assisted John with his research on this fascinating band and the style of music it generated.Eye-witness accounts refer to the 369th band ‘dancing’ rather than ‘marching’. Above all, in modern performance, finding a ‘dancing beat’ is crucial to a successful performance of this Ragtime march in order to do justice to the great pioneering work of James Reese Europe.Note the the reckless abandon with which glissando, at that time a novel effect, is used!Look and Listen (courtesy of the Tullis Russell Mills Band):Background to the Harlem HellfightersThe US Army 369th Regiment, made up largely of African-Americans from New York, became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because of the heroic reputation which accrued to them during the actions they engaged in during the First World War in Europe.James Reese Europe was one of the most active African-American composer/musical directors in the pre-war American music scene. The legendary Harlem Hellfighters Band, which he assembled in 1917 from African-American and Puerto Rican musicians, came at an important transitional point in musical history. A new form of music called jazz was emerging from Ragtime and the performing style of Europe’s band was immersed in the flow of this new direction.Europe’s Harlem Hellfighters influenced and inspired everyone who heard them, including the welcoming crowd when they disembarked in France, bowled over by their swinging rendition of La Marseillaise. Reese Europe became a war hero, commanding a machine-gun unit as well as the band.On return from War in 1919 the band led a ticker-tape parade along Fifth Avenue in New York and soon made about 30 shellac recordings. These recordings display some of the fingerprints of their performing style: ragging, improvising, muting, wailing, smearing (their word for glissando) – and from the evidence of their recordings they took the printed page as a blueprint for individuality.In May 1919 during the Hellfighters’ triumphant coast-to-coast tour after their return, James Reese Europe was tragically murdered, bringing to premature close, at the age of 39, the work of a great musical innovator.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £30.00

    The St Louis Blues - Sandy Coffin, W C Handy

    Two-Step MarchCommissioned by John Wallace, this arrangement of The St Louis Blues has been crafted by Sandy Coffin through close listening of the available recordings of the Harlem Hellfighters Band. Sandy had been heavily involved with the Historic Brass Society symposium 2017 held in New York and assisted John with his research on this fascinating band and the style of music it generated.Eye-witness accounts refer to the 369th band ‘dancing’ rather than ‘marching’. Above all, in modern performance, finding a ‘dancing beat’ is crucial to a successful performance of this Ragtime march in order to do justice to the great pioneering work of James Reese Europe.Note the flutter-tonguing and use of muting, the counter-melody in soprano cornet, and the wilder and yet wilder nature of each repetition of the Chorus.Look and Listen:Background to the Harlem HellfightersThe US Army 369th Regiment, made up largely of African-Americans from New York, became known as the Harlem Hellfighters because of the heroic reputation which accrued to them during the actions they engaged in during the First World War in Europe.James Reese Europe was one of the most active African-American composer/musical directors in the pre-war American music scene. The legendary Harlem Hellfighters Band, which he assembled in 1917 from African-American and Puerto Rican musicians, came at an important transitional point in musical history. A new form of music called jazz was emerging from Ragtime and the performing style of Europe’s band was immersed in the flow of this new direction.Europe’s Harlem Hellfighters influenced and inspired everyone who heard them, including the welcoming crowd when they disembarked in France, bowled over by their swinging rendition of La Marseillaise. Reese Europe became a war hero, commanding a machine-gun unit as well as the band.On return from War in 1919 the band led a ticker-tape parade along Fifth Avenue in New York and soon made about 30 shellac recordings. These recordings display some of the fingerprints of their performing style: ragging, improvising, muting, wailing, smearing (their word for glissando) – and from the evidence of their recordings they took the printed page as a blueprint for individuality.In May 1919 during the Hellfighters’ triumphant coast-to-coast tour after their return, James Reese Europe was tragically murdered, bringing to premature close, at the age of 39, the work of a great musical innovator.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days