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  • £54.95

    Songs of World War II (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    A Medley of Popular Songs (1939-1945)Includes:In the MoodA Nightingale Sang in Berkeley SquareWe're Gonna Hang Out the Washing on the Siegfried LineRun, Rabbit, Run!Kiss Me Goodnight, Sergeant MajorI'll Be Seeing You

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £44.95

    Keep Smiling Through (World War II Medley)

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £54.95

    Songs of World War II (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wiffin, Rob

    A Medley of Popular Songs (1939-1945)Includes:In the MoodA Nightingale Sang in Berkeley SquareWe're Gonna Hang Out the Washing on the Siegfried LineRun, Rabbit, Run!Kiss Me Goodnight, Sergeant MajorI'll Be Seeing You

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £44.95

    Keep Smiling Through (World War II)

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days
  • £37.50

    Bless 'Em All - Various - Gavin Somerset

    Keeping spirits high during World War II was essential, and music played a huge part. Darrol Barry's excellent arrangement 'Keep Smiling Through' has been pleasing audiences for years and can probably be found in most brass bands libraries across the country. This latest release of popular war time songs including 'Wish Me Luck, As You Wave Me Goodbye', 'We're Going To Hang Out The Washing', 'Kiss Me Goodnight Sgt. Major', 'Good Morning', 'Bless 'Em All' and the highlight of the piece, the slow, hair raising middle movement 'Apple Blossom Time', was originally released to coincide with the 70th Anniversary of the Battle Of Britain. All of these songs were sung as the London population camped out in the underground stations. This arrangement will get the feet tapping as audiences sing along to the lively pieces and then sends shivers down their spines with the gorgeous 'Apple Blossom Time' featuring in the middle of the medley. This is a piece not to be missed and should belong in all bands libraries.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £29.95

    Rhapsody in Brass (Score Only)

    Rhapsody in Brass is in three movements and was written for the British Open Championships in 1949, held at Belle Vue in Manchester. The contest winners were Fairey Aviation Works Band under the baton of Harry Mortimer. Eric Ball came second with Ransome & Marles and Stanley Boddington 3rd with Munn and Felton Band. Rhapsody in Brass had the unusual distinction of being written as a test piece by a Salvation Army composer. Eric Ball's Resurgam was the only other piece to achieve that dual personality in that era.Dean Goffin was born in 1916 in Wellington, New Zealand, son of Henry Goffin, a Salvation Army officer and composer. At 19 he was appointed Bandmaster of the Wellington South Band and when World War II started, he enlisted in the New Zealand Armed Forces where he became Bandmaster of the 20th Infantry Battalion and later the 4th Brigade Band. During the time he served with them in the Middle East and Europe, he composed and arranged numerous pieces among which Rhapsody in Brass and the march Bel Hamid, later adapted for Salvation Army use and renamed Anthem of the Free.After the war, Dean kept on composing and his work was featured by the Wellington South Band. Later he transferred to Timaru for another job and became Bandmaster there. He was studying music at the time and as he wanted to take part in a competition for devotional selections for Salvation Army use, he sent some of his compositions to the International Headquarters. When Rhapsody for Brass was chosen as the test-piece for the British Open Championships, people at the Salvation Army started asking questions about the lack of publications of his work. It was discovered that the pieces submitted for the competition didn't meet the exact criteria. Among these pieces was one of his most appealing works The Light of the World which was published a year later, in 1950, the same year as he completed his Bachelor of Music studies at Otagu University.After entering the Salvation Army Training College in Wellington with his wife, Marjorie, Dean was in 1956 appointed National Bandmaster in the British Territory. Later he became National Secretary for Bands and Songster Brigades and in this period he organised the yearly festival in the Royal Albert Hall and was responsible for the national music schools in the UK. Dean returned to his home country in 1966 and to mark the centenary of the Salvation Army in New Zealand he was knighted by the Queen in 1983. Sir Dean Goffin died on 23 January 1984.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £59.99

    The Longest Day - Paul Anka

    This classic 1962 war film about the landing of the Allied troops at the end of the Second World War is a historic link to the recent D-Day memorial. This upbeat march is a kind of cynical reference to the horror and madness of World War II at the time of the fall of the Third Reich.

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

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  • £40.00

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept-Brown-Tobias - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war. Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert. On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good. If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated dispatch 12-14 working days
  • £30.00

    My Little Welsh Home - Traditional

    A beautiful arrangement by Tim Paton of a Welsh song by W S Gwynne Williams. Created in memory of his mother, Tim has produced a wonderful version for brass band and has also included an optional vocal solo or unison choir line.Comments from the arranger:I have arranged [My Little Welsh Home] in memory of my mother. [She] was born, Doreen Davies, on 27th November 1918, in Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, a small town in South West Wales. She had a beautiful voice, and met my father, Bill Paton, during World War II, whilst she was singing in a troop concert at the County Theatre in her home town, and my father was the MC.Throughout her life, my mother and father entertained, and she was singing right up until the final months of her life. She spent many years in Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, a seaside town in South West England, and it was here that she passed away on 20th September 2004. During the last several months of her life, she often referred to the song My Little Welsh Home:Here are the words.I am dreaming of the mountains of my homeOf the mountains where in childhood I would roamI have dwelt 'neath southern skiesWhere the summer never diesBut my heart is in the mountains of my homeI can see the little homestead on the hillI can hear the magic music of the RhyllThere is nothing to compareWith the love that once was thereIn the lonely little homestead on the hillI can see the quiet churchyard down belowWhere the mountain breezes wander to and froAnd when God my soul will keepIt is there I want to sleepWith those dear old folks that loved me long agoLooking at the words, I can see why it meant so much to her. Haverfordwest is at the foot of the Preseli Mountains, and her home and church were at the top of a hill. My mothers' ashes were taken back to her own little Welsh home, and laid to rest in the grounds of the church where she had been Christened, Confirmed and Married.Look and Listen (Score-reading digital sound-sample):

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £35.00

    Pomp & Circumstance March No.4 - Edward Elgar arr. Phillip Littlemore

    Pomp & Circumstance March No. 4 was completed in June 1907, shortly after his fiftieth birthday. Like the first, it contains an equally impressive 'big tune' in the trio section, but it also matches No.1 in that it has a lively, rhythmic march element to envelope it.Unlike No.1 though, Elgar cleverly superimposes one on top of the other for the final, extended coda. Several attempts have been made to fit words to the main tune, the first of which were by the composer's wife, Alice, for her song The King's Way to celebrate the opening of a road in London. The music was then set to Alfred Noye's Song of Victory before a later attempt to make a patriotic Song of Liberty for World War II by the author A P Herbert.Duration: 4'50"Difficulty: 3rd Section and above

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days