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  • £34.95

    Keep Smiling Through (World War II Medley)

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.50

    Bless 'Em All - Various - Gavin Somerset

    Keeping spirits high during World War II was essential, and music played a huge part. Darrol Barry's excellent arrangement 'Keep Smiling Through' has been pleasing audiences for years and can probably be found in most brass bands libraries across the country. This new release of popular war time songs including 'Wish Me Luck, As You Wave Me Goodbye', 'We're Going To Hang Out The Washing', 'Kiss Me Goodnight Sgt. Major', 'Good Morning', 'Bless 'Em All' and the highlight of the piece, the slow, hair raising middle movement 'Apple Blossom Time', is being released to coincide with the 70th Anniversary of the Battle Of Britain. All of these songs were sung as the London population camped out in the underground stations. This arrangement will get the feet tapping as audiences sing along to the lively pieces and then sends shivers down their spines with the gorgeous 'Apple Blossom Time' featuring in the middle of the medley. This is a piece not to be missed and should belong in all bands libraries.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £71.20

    A Derwentside SuiteA - Sandy Smith

    Includes: Romans; Blanchland; The Industrial Revolution; Conflict - World War I and World War II; The Present Age

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    Rhapsody in Brass - Dean Goffin

    Rhapsody in Brass is in three movements and was written for the British Open Championships in 1949, held at Belle Vue in Manchester. The contest winners were Fairey Aviation Works Band under the baton of Harry Mortimer. Eric Ball came second with Ransome & Marles and Stanley Boddington 3rd with Munn and Felton Band. Rhapsody in Brass had the unusual distinction of being written as a test piece by a Salvation Army composer. Eric Ball's Resurgam was the only other piece to achieve that dual personality in that era.Dean Goffin was born in 1916 in Wellington, New Zealand, son of Henry Goffin, a Salvation Army officer and composer. At 19 he was appointed Bandmaster of the Wellington South Band and when World War II started, he enlisted in the New Zealand Armed Forces where he became Bandmaster of the 20th Infantry Battalion and later the 4th Brigade Band. During the time he served with them in the Middle East and Europe, he composed and arranged numerous pieces among which Rhapsody in Brass and the march Bel Hamid, later adapted for Salvation Army use and renamed Anthem of the Free.After the war, Dean kept on composing and his work was featured by the Wellington South Band. Later he transferred to Timaru for another job and became Bandmaster there. He was studying music at the time and as he wanted to take part in a competition for devotional selections for Salvation Army use, he sent some of his compositions to the International Headquarters. When Rhapsody for Brass was chosen as the test-piece for the British Open Championships, people at the Salvation Army started asking questions about the lack of publications of his work. It was discovered that the pieces submitted for the competition didn't meet the exact criteria. Among these pieces was one of his most appealing works The Light of the World which was published a year later, in 1950, the same year as he completed his Bachelor of Music studies at Otagu University.After entering the Salvation Army Training College in Wellington with his wife, Marjorie, Dean was in 1956 appointed National Bandmaster in the British Territory. Later he became National Secretary for Bands and Songster Brigades and in this period he organised the yearly festival in the Royal Albert Hall and was responsible for the national music schools in the UK. Dean returned to his home country in 1966 and to mark the centenary of the Salvation Army in New Zealand he was knighted by the Queen in 1983. Sir Dean Goffin died on 23 January 1984.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Peacemakers - Dan Price

    Peacemakers was composed for Robert Childs and the Grimethorpe Colliery Band. It received its world premiere on November 17th 2014 at The Sage and concluded their winning ‘Brass in Concert' program, ‘Lest We Forget'.As well as commemorating the centenary of World War I, 2014 also marked the 75th Anniversary of the outbreak of Word War II. Dan Price's Peacemakers pays tribute to those who fought, and uses two contrasting musical ideas as its basis. The motifs and material for the first theme take inspiration from Morse code patterns, and as the work nears a triumphant close the allied forces of World War II are remembered through the words of British Prime Minister Sir Winston Churchill broadcast on 20th August 1940. This speech can be narrated. Alternatively, a free audio download is available from the downloads section of this site.Peacemakers has been recorded by Grimethorpe Colliery Band on their CD 'Grimethorpe Entertain' available to buy here.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £44.00

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept-Brown-Tobias - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war. Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert. On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good. If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.60

    Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree - Stept - Bjorn Morten Kjaernes

    "Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else but Me)" is a popular song that was made famous by Glenn Miller and by the Andrews Sisters during World War II. Its lyrics are the words of two young lovers who pledge their fidelity while one of them is away serving in the war.Originally titled "Anywhere the Bluebird Goes", the melody was written by Sam H. Stept as an updated version of the nineteenth-century English folk song "Long, Long Ago". Lew Brown and Charles Tobias wrote the lyrics and the song debuted in the 1939 Broadway musical Yokel Boy. After the United States entered the war in December 1941, Brown and Tobias modified the lyrics to their current form, with the chorus ending with "...'till I come marching home".In 1942 the song was featured in the film Private Buckaroo as a performance by the Andrews Sisters with the Harry James orchestra and featuring a tap dancing routine by The Jivin' Jacks and Jills. It was featured in the films Twelve O'Clock High (1949), With a Song in My Heart (1952), Kiss Them for Me (1957), A Carol for Another Christmas (1964), In Dreams (1999) and The Master (2012). It also featured in the mini-series The Pacific. You can use the song both on musical concerts, movie concerts or just as a happy jazz tune on your next concert.On the sections (like from bar 25), please work carefully to make a good balance with all parts, and that each chord is balanced. With 4-part harmonies sometimes you need to hold back certain notes to make the accord sound good.If you want to open up for a longer improvisation, you can repeat 65 to 81, but then change the part 2 in bar 80 from Eb to a D on the repeat. The accord will be an F6 instead of F7 (on beat 3 and 4 in bar 80) Have fun and enjoy!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £65.00 £65.00
    Buy from PHM Publishing

    A Wartime Sketchbook by William Walton, arr. Paul Hindmarsh

    During World War II, William Walton, one of the most eminent of British composers, provided music for several films deemed to be of 'national importance'. Scoring Lawrence Olivier's Shakespeare epic Henry V in 1943 was the most substantial of these wartime projects. His role in patriotic films from 1941 and 42 like The Foreman Went to France, Next of Kin, Went the day Well? and The First of the Few was to provide appropriate title music and some underscoring at key moments. Walton extracted the most substantial portions of the latter as the popular Spitfire Prelude and Fugue for orchestra. The remaining music remained unpublished until 1990, when Christopher Palmer assembled the highlights from the soundtracks into A Wartime Sketchbook, ssix numbers of which were arranged into a colourful suite for Besses o' th' Barn and Black Dyke Mills bands in the 1990s. 1. Prologue: This is the stirring title music from Went the day Well?, a screen play by Graham Greene about a German airborne invasion of an English village. The main theme leads to (2) Bicycle Chase, characteristic musical high-jinks for J.B.Priestley's The Foreman went to France. (3) Refugees, from the same film, is a poignant accompaniment to the long march of refugees, while (4) Young Siegfrieds is a lively movement comes from the music that Walton composed for The Battle of Britain in 1968, but which the film's producer rejected. It portrays first the Berliners, cheerfully ignoring the black-out and then, in the trio, the Young Siegfrieds of the Luftwaffe, courtesy of a parody of Siegfried's horn call from Wagner's opera. In (5) Romance from Next of Kin, a soldier and a Dutch refugee snatch a few tender moments together. (6) Epilogue: at the end of The Foreman went to France, the French look forward with hope and optimism to eventual liberation. Romance (3') and Young Siegrfireds (4') can be performed separately. Duration: 14 mins Published by arrangement with the copyright holders, Oxford University Press. ?65, plus postage and packingPHM Catalogue No. PHM008

  • £24.95

    Broadway Boogie - Dave Collins

    Broadway Boogie was commissioned by Leigh Baker and was premiered by the Carlton Main Frickley Colliery Brass Band as part of their 2014 Brass in Concert programme at the Sage, Gateshead. The work is inspired by Piet Mondriaan’s Broadway Boogie-Woogie, which was his last fully completed picture. Mondriaan arrived in New York in 1940, one of the many European artists who moved to the United States to escape World War II. He fell in love with the city immediately, as well as Boogie-Woogie music – to which he was introduced on his first evening in New York.Broadway Boogie is an exciting, dynamic work that is directly influenced by the work of Piet Mondriaan. The atomized bands of stuttering chromatic pulses, interrupted by light grey, create paths through the work suggesting the city’s grid, the movement of traffic, and blinking electric lights – as well as the rhythm of jazz.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £47.00

    Colditz March - Robert Farnon - Philip Sparke

    Acclaimed Canadian composer/arranger Robert Farnon penned this distinctive march theme for the 1970s BBC television drama Colditz telling the story of prisoners held at Colditz Castle, Germany, during World War II. Philip Sparke’s extended concert version is expertly scored for band and an elegant and powerful addition to any programme.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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