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  • £46.20
  • £75.90

    Woman in Love - Robin Gibb

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £46.20

    WOMAN IN LOVE (Brass Band) - Gibb & Gibb - Broadbent, Derek

    Medium

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £20.00

    Voi Che Sapete (from The Marriage of Figaro) (Euphonium Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus - Littlemore, Phillip

    Mozart's opera, The Marriage of Figaro, was based on what was a rather scandalous play by Pierre Beaumarchais, because the drama involves an incompetent nobleman being upstaged by a crafty, quick-witted servant named Figaro, in their quest for the same woman. The action takes place in just one day and offers a series of awkward and humorous situations, complete with a vibrant dialogue between the all the main characters. Voi Che Sapeteis performed by Cherubino, who is about to be sent off to the army because the Count finds him a nuisance. When Cherubino appears before the Countess and Susanna to tell them of his fate, this aria is sung at the request of Susanna for a love song. Cherubino is characterized as a young adolescent who is in love with every woman he meets, and because his voice is yet unbroken, he is always played by a female singer.Duration: 2:30

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £20.00

    Voi Che Sapete (from The Marriage of Figaro) (Vocal Solo (Soprano) with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus - Littlemore, Phillip

    Mozart's opera, The Marriage of Figaro, was based on what was a rather scandalous play by Pierre Beaumarchais, because the drama involves an incompetent nobleman being upstaged by a crafty, quick-witted servant named Figaro, in their quest for the same woman. The action takes place in just one day and offers a series of awkward and humorous situations, complete with a vibrant dialogue between the all the main characters. Voi Che Sapeteis performed by Cherubino, who is about to be sent off to the army because the Count finds him a nuisance. When Cherubino appears before the Countess and Susanna to tell them of his fate, this aria is sung at the request of Susanna for a love song. Cherubino is characterized as a young adolescent who is in love with every woman he meets, and because his voice is yet unbroken, he is always played by a female singer.Duration: 2:30

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days

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  • £20.00

    Voi Chi Sapete - Phillip Littlemore

    Mozart's opera, The Marriage of Figaro , was based on what was a rather scandalous play by Pierre Beaumarchais, because the drama involves an incompetent nobleman being upstaged by a crafty, quick-witted servant named Figaro, in their quest for the same woman. The action takes place in just one day and offers a series of awkward and humorous situations, complete with a vibrant dialogue between the all the main characters. Voi Che Sapete is performed by Cherubino, who is about to be sent off to the army because the Count finds him a nuisance. When Cherubino appears before the Countess and Susanna to tell them of his fate, this aria is sung at the request of Susanna for a love song. Cherubino is characterized as a young adolescent who is in love with every woman he meets, and because his voice is yet unbroken, he is always played by a female singer. Item Code: TPBB-019 Duration: c.2'30" Grade: Suitable for all

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £19.95

    Mythical Tales (Brass Quintet) - Bond, ChristopherEnsemble Size:

    Mythical Tales (2012) is a ten minute work in three movements which represents three of the most popular folk stories or indeed in the case of the first movement, true stories, in Welsh culture.I. Owain GlyndwrOwain Glyn Dwr was born around the 1350s into an Anglo-Welsh gentry family. His estates provided him with a modest power base in north-east Wales. After a number of disputes, he proclaimed himself prince of Wales in September 1400.Glyn Dwr led several battles with the English, although he was never captured. Over the next few years punitive measures were enacted to keep control of Wales, but these were matched by many acts of Welsh rebellion - among them the capture of Conwy Castle in April 1401. In June 1402, at the Battle of Pilleth on Bryn Glas Hill, Glyn Dwr led his troops to victory over an English army. By now Glyn Dwr was leading a national revolt. In 1404, he led a march towards Wocester, but failed, with the English capturing parts of Wales. He died defending his country.II. MyfanwyMyfanwy was the most beautiful woman in Powys, but she was vain and liked nothing better than to be told how beautiful she was. Many handsome men would court her, but she would not show interest because they couldn’t sing and play to her, reflecting her true beauty.Luckily, a penniless bard, Hywel ap Einion was in love with Myfanwy, and one day plucked up the courage to climb up the hill to the castle with his harp, to sing and play to her. He’s allowed in to play for her, and while he’s playing and complimenting her on her beauty she can neither listen nor look at any other man. Because of this Hywel believes that she has fallen in love with him. But his hopes are dashed when a richer, more handsome and more eloquent lover comes along. The music of the second movement portrays the despair and upset that Hywel must have felt.III. Battle of the DragonsMany centuries ago when dragons roamed the land, a white ice dragon descended on a small village and decided to live there, not knowing that a red fire dragon was already living nearby.Six months later the red dragon awoke to find a huge white dragon wrapped around his village that he cared for. He could tell that his people were ill from the cold. The Land was bare; nothing was able to grow not even the pesky dandelions. The people were starving. The people longed for the red dragon to free them from the icy misery, so that their life and land could return to the sunny and warm climate that it was once before.The red fire dragon challenged the white ice dragon to a single combat fight at the top of the cliff the next day. The people of the village watched in terror awaiting their fate. The red dragon beat the white dragon, and the crowd cheered with joy as the red dragon roared with triumph. The mayor of the village declared that the land should always fly a flag with the symbol of a Red dragon on it. The flag's background should be half green and half white; the green to represent the lush green grass of the land and the white to represent the ice. This way no one would ever forget what happened.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £35.00

    The Witches' Sabbath - Berlioz

    An effective arrangement of the exciting finale from Berlioz’s greatest masterpiece ‘Symphonie Fantastique’.This new ‘finisher’ is all about an opium induced fantasy Berlioz had about rescuing a woman he was madly in love with from a group of evil witches and other assorted ghouls.After many brilliant musical descriptions of the eerie scenes, Berlioz triumphantly rescues his beloved narrowly saving her from being sacrificed by the witches!First performed by Whitburn Band at Spennymoor 24 and recorded by them on the ‘Live from Spennymoor 24’ CD.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £20.00

    Scarborough Fair

    Scarborough Fair is a traditional English ballad about the Yorkshire town of Scarborough. The song relates the tale of a young man who instructs the listener to tell his former love to perform for him a series of impossible tasks, such as making him a shirt without a seam and then washing it in a dry well, adding that if she completes these tasks he will take her back. Often the song is sung as a duet, with the woman then giving her lover a series of equally impossible tasks, promising to give him his seamless shirt once he has finished.As the versions of the ballad known under the title Scarborough Fair are usually limited to the exchange of these impossible tasks, many suggestions concerning the plot have been proposed, including the theory that it is about the Great Plague of the late Middle Ages. The lyrics of "Scarborough Fair" appear to have something in common with an obscure Scottish ballad, The Elfin Knight which has been traced at least as far back as 1670 and may well be earlier. In this ballad, an elf threatens to abduct a young woman to be his lover unless she can perform an impossible task.As the song spread, it was adapted, modified, and rewritten to the point that dozens of versions existed by the end of the 18th century, although only a few are typically sung nowadays. The references to the traditional English fair, "Scarborough Fair" and the refrain "parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme" date to 19th century versions. A number of older versions refer to locations other than Scarborough Fair, including Wittingham Fair, Cape Ann, "twixt Berwik and Lyne", etc.The earliest notable recording of it was by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, a version which heavily influenced Simon and Garfunkel's later more famous version. Amongst many other recordings, the tune was used by the Stone Roses as the basis of their song "Elizabeth my Dear".Hear a computer realisation of the score and follow the music in the video below:

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days