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  • £21.50

    Well Did You Evah! - Cole Porter - Gavin Somerset

    This fantastic, high-energy, showcase of a piece was originally composed by Cole Porter for the musical 'Du Barry Was A Lady'. However, it was not until it was performed by Bing Crosby & Frank Sinatra in the film 'High Society' that the piece shot to fame in 1956 and then again in 2001 when Robbie Williams performed the duet with Jon Lovitz on his album 'Swing When Your Winning'. Your band can now faithfully recreate Crosby & Sinatra's clever, comic on screen interaction in this arrangement by Gavin Somerset that is scored as a duet for any two Bb instruments to take the spotlight, or an Eb & Bb instrument. An entertaining piece for the entire band and one your audiences will love! To download the playback audio to play along to, please RIGHT CLICK HERE & Save As .

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £27.50

    Well, Did you Evah! - Porter, C - Somerset, G

    Released in 1956, the Hollywood musicalHigh Society was a musical remake of ThePhiladelphia Story. It had a star studdedcast, including Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby,Grace Kelly and Louis Armstrong (whoplayed himself). Gavin Somerset'sarrangement of Well, Did you Evah!faithfully reproduces the famous Crosby/Sinatra duet for two euphoniums.Entertainment at its best!!4th section +

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £21.50

    Well Did You Evah! - Cole Porter

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score and Parts - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score Only - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.00

    Cowboy Carol - Tim Paton

    Note from arranger, Tim Paton:When I first thought about arranging this well known carol, it was going to be for band and choir. I did however change my mind – every band part has a ‘songsheet’ attached to it. Between 10 & 14 of the band members are directed to the songsheet, (every member of the band is also a vocalist at some point in the proceedings)! before the full band plays a final verse and chorus of this fabulous Cecil Broadhurst song as a big ending. Of course, it is still possible to perform it with a choir as well/instead, or even a soloist. (If you wish, the scoring means that this would also be an effective part of your programme without any vocals).Robert Childs commented:“Tim Paton has produced a very interesting and flexible arrangement”

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £91.10

    Circius - Torstein Aagaard-Nilsen

    The work is important for me because it was my first piece to be performed outside Norway. Black Dyke Band/David King performed it and did a recording of it in 1991.In the original score I quote a Swedish bishop (Olaus Mangnus) who lived in the 15th century. He travelled around Scandinavia and drew maps - very important historic material.When he came to the north of Norway (where I come from) he decribed the wind from the north as Ciricus: (something like) Worst of all winds is Circius, that revolves (?= turn upside down) heaven and earth. (Well, not a good translation Im afraid).The fast sections reflects the mighty winds from the north. In the middle section, I borrowed a folksong-like tune (by C. Elling, a Norwegian composer). The text (by Kristoffer Janson) tells about old times when the fishermen used open boats: they had to put their lives in the hands of God.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £16.50

    Voyage with the VOC - William Vean

    The Netherlands have been an important trading nation for a long time - partly as a result of their geographical situation. One of the first multinationals in The Netherlands was the 'Verenigde Oostindische Compagnie' (VOC). The aim of the VOC was to send ships to Asia in order to buy pepper and spices, and to take over the Portuguese monopoly in this field. The Company was successful. An era of great prosperity resulted, in which the art of painting (Rembrandt van Rijn) as well as science (Constantijn Huygens) flourished alongside a thriving economy. 1. The Sails are set : There is a lot of hustle and bustle on the quay. The crew are preparing for departure. Goodbyes are said and once the sails have been hoisted the ship sets out to sea.2. A Visit to the Rajah of Yogyakarta: After a voyage of many months the place of destination is reached. A visit to the Radja, the king of the area around Yokyakarta, follows. The dishes and beverages and the native culture in general are very pleasant after having been on a diet of ship's biscuit and water for such a long time.3. The Holds have been loaded: The holds have been loaded to the brim, and the voyage home can be begin!4. Death sails along: Life at sea is rough. not seldom did a sailor die of a tropical disease or scurvy. After a memorial service, the Captain would speak the words 'One, two, three, in God's name ...' and the body, wrapped in canvas, would be committed to the sea.5. A joyful homecoming: After many months of hardship coming home is perhaps the best part of the entire voyage. The quay is filled with people eager to give the crew a warm welcome.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £6.95

    Auld Lang Syne - Menno Haantjes

    Whereas 'Auld Lang Syne' may be considered the best-known Scottish song ever, yet at the same time it is an obscure one, for there are but few people who know the complete text by heart. After the familiar 'Should auld acquaintance be forgot .....' many people take their refuge to lyrics like 'rum tee dum ta dee ..... lah, lah, lah ........... for auld lang syne'. Even in Scotland only a handful of persons know the entire text and are able to give a correct rendering of it. The current lyrics have been attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Burns, however, he did not write the whole poem : after he had heard an old man sing the centuries-old Scotch ballad, he wrote it down and added a number of stanzas (1788). Historical research teaches us that the ballad served many purposes, both political and religious. Nowadays, 'Auld Lang Syne' is sung as a Christmas Carol and it is also sung on New Year's Eve at the turning of the year. Apart from that, though, the song is also sung on many other occasions - sometimes with different lyrics, which usually have Love, Friendship and/or Parting as their themes, as these go well with the fascinating melody. In this arrangement a low-sounding solo instrument is central. The harmonization in the accompaniment fits in perfectly with the sentiments this song will evoke. Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind? Should auld acquintance be forgot. And days of auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne, We'll take a cup of kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £30.00

    A Rachmaninoff Prelude - Rachmaninoff

    I first heard the Rachmaninoff Prelude in G minor when my brother, (Dr) Rod Paton, used to play it on the piano. The martial sound of the opening theme caught my imagination, and I knew then that this piece would sound magnificent if played by a brass band. If you like the music of Rachmaninoff, then you will love this piece. That spectacular sound that we all know, with busy, melodic bass lines, and a middle section in his well known ‘romantic’ style – (I could already hear the euphonium playing those rippling arpeggios). In response to the enthusiasm for this magnificent piece, I have lightheartedly commented that maybe he wrote it for brass band, but there wasn’t one available, so he did it for piano instead!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days