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  • £24.95

    Tortuguero 6 - Jonathan Bates

    Written for the 2012 Royal Northern College of Music, Festival of Brass, the piece reflects one of the year's major talking points. For many spiritualist believers, the 21st December 2012 marks the end of the Mayan Calander - and the end of time.The pre-historic Mayan civilisation was founded in Columbia, but its influences spread through South America and into Central Mexico. The Mexican region of Tortuguero, surrounded by dense forestry, is the site of a number of ancient monuments. The sixth monument contains the only remaining inscriptions by Mayan leaders in the world, which relate to the end of the 13th b'ak'tun (era), before a whole new creation of species upon the earth at the beginning of the 14th.Tortuguero 6, is a musical portrait of the history of the monument. The bold opening marks its prehistoric erection by the Mayans - the more fluid passages following representing its dormant state while its surrounding fall and are taken over by thick forests and the final cataclysmic statements showing its role towards the end of the 13th b'ak'tun as the world, as we know it, comes to an end.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £45.00

    Bathgate Hills Trilogy - Andrew Duncan

    Composed by Andrew Duncan and written for the West Lothian Schools Band, A Bathgate Hills Trilogy is in three movements, each one dedicated to and representing a different hill.Comments from the composer:Movement 1 – Dechmont LawThe first movement describes the peculiar events which took place in November 1979 when a forestry worker, Bob Taylor, had a close encounter with an alien spacecraft in Dechmont Woods at the bottom of Dechmont Hill. Bob Taylor’s account from the time describes a large sphere like object about twenty feet across which pulled him by the legs towards it, caustic smoke then caused him to pass out. He awoke a short time later in the same spot but the spaceship had gone leaving behind marks in the soil. His story caused a great deal of media interest and a great deal of excitement in the local community.Movement 2 – The Knock HillThe Term ‘Knock’ is Scottish Gaelic for ‘hill’ and the Knock Hill is the highest peak in the Bathgate Hills being 305 metres above Sea Level. On a clear day the Knock hill has excellent views of the Bass Rock to the East and the distant hills of Arran to the West as well as of the whole of West Lothian and across the Firth of Forth to Fife and beyond to the North.The second movement is a description of a leisurely walk to the summit of this hill and the enjoyment of a pleasant summer’s day spent walking and taking in the beautiful panoramic views. However, as is the case with the Scottish Summer, a change in the weather finds a clear blue sky being replaced with dark rain clouds. The changed weather brings a sudden brief but unwelcome cold downpour of rain, drenching anyone out walking! Finally, the clouds pass and the more pleasant summer weather returns.Movement 3 – Cairnpapple HillCairnpapple Hill is a near neighbour of the Knock Hill. It is almost as high but interest in Cairnpapple Hill lies in the outstanding archaeological monument near the summit, an Iron Age burial chamber. The chamber dates back to 25 years BC and was built by a mysterious people known as the Beaker People (so called because they left behind a number of large earthenware beakers). The mysteries of Cairnpapple Hill have always been a source of fascination for me ever since first visiting the hill as a school child.The third movement describes the lives of the Beaker People. The landscape they would have looked out on would have been mostly dense forest which would have contained many perils including dangerous wolves and bears. Life was harsh and short for the Beaker People and they would always have been close to danger and to death. The average life expectancy for the Beaker People was only 31 years of age. The summit of the hill would have been clear of forest and would have afforded the Beaker People some protection as they could see all around the near countryside enabling them to keep a watchful lookout for their enemies – both animal and human!

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £76.99

    Ross Roy (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - De Haan, Jacob

    In this composition, Jacob de Haan sees the "Ross Roy" as a metaphor for the years spent at school (a monument in time), where one's personality is formed. So, the opening theme the artist calls the Ross Roy theme initially has monumental characteristics.The rhythmic motion, which strides along in the lower register and percussion at the beginning of the next section is typical of "Tempo di Marcia". This movement, accompanied by repetitions of sound, is a metaphor for the structure and discipline in school. This is the introduction to a march theme, symbolic of "passing through" the classes up to the final examinations.Then, the Ross Roy theme is dealt with again, now in a playful, humorous variation. As if the composer is saying there should also be time for a smile in school. The same theme can be heard in major key and a slower tempo in the following section, expressing pride and self-confidence. This is also the introduction to the expressive middle section that represents love, friendship and understanding.We then return to the march theme in a slightly altered construction. The oriental sounds, constituting the modulation to the final theme, are symbols of the diversity of cultures in the school. The characteristic final theme first sounds solemn, but turns into a festive apotheosis. It is no coincidence that the final cadence is reminiscent of the close to a traditional overture, for the school years can be considered the "overture" to the rest of one's life.Duration: 9:20

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £107.99

    Stonehenge (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Van der Roost, Jan

    This piece attempts to portray atmospheric pictures through music. The opening section evokes the somewhat misty and hazy early morning atmosphere surrounding the ancient monument. When the band reaches its first dynamic climax it is as if the massive boulders are audible, even touchable through the use of minor 3rd chords. The main theme - constructed on the notes CAFBG symbolises the arrangement of the central boulders in the shape of a horseshoe, which forms the focal point of this huge collection of stones. Towards the end of the work you will experience a fantastic effect when five soloists play a five part hymn whilst other members of the band create a special atmosphere by imitating a choir of monks and druids. A fantastic major concert work for advanced bands.Duration: 15:00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £76.99

    Ross Roy - Jacob de Haan

    In this composition, Jacob de Haan sees the "Ross Roy" as a metaphor for the years spent at school (a monument in time), where one's personality is formed. So, the opening theme the artist calls the Ross Roy theme initially has monumental characteristics.The rhythmic motion, which strides along in the lower register and percussion at the beginning of the next section is typical of "Tempo di Marcia". This movement, accompanied by repetitions of sound, is a metaphor for the structure and discipline in school. This is the introduction to a march theme, symbolic of "passing through" the classes up to the final examinations.Then, the Ross Roy theme is dealt with again, now in a playful, humorous variation. As if the composer is saying there should also be time for a smile in school. The same theme can be heard in major key and a slower tempo in the following section, expressing pride and self-confidence. This is also the introduction to the expressive middle section that represents love, friendship and understanding.We then return to the march theme in a slightly altered construction. The oriental sounds, constituting the modulation to the final theme, are symbols of the diversity of cultures in the school. The characteristic final theme first sounds solemn, but turns into a festive apotheosis. It is no coincidence that the final cadence is reminiscent of the close to a traditional overture, for the school years can be considered the "overture" to the rest of one's life.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £25.00 £25.00
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    In Dreams - Roy Orbison - Len Jenkins

    "In Dreams" is a song composed and sung by rock and roll performer Roy Orbison, and was released as a single on Monument Records in February 1963. Orbison later claimed that the origin for "In Dreams" came to him while he was sleeping, as many of his songs did. When he woke up the next morning, the entire composition was written in 20 minutes. Like many of Orbison's songs, but unlike the majority of rock and roll ballads, in under 3 minutes it goes through seven movements with distinct melodies and chord progressions without repeating itself. It was for that reason that I have always believed it was a suitable piece for brass where one does not have lyrics to distinguish changes between verses to avoid monotony. Graham Cooper