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  • £39.50

    Entry of the Gods into Valhalla - Wagner, R.

    The Valkyrie, the second opera of Wagner's Ring cycle, ends with the Gods crossing the rainbow bridge and entering into Valhalla, another name for Odin's Hall, the home for the slain in battle. Wagner's mish-mash of ancient Norse and Germanic legend need not worry the listener too much unless he or she wants to take in the whole Wagner experience. Needless to say, in this excerpt there is more than enough to enjoy of the majesty and variety of Wagner's music.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £37.50

    Submerged Cathedral, The - Debussy, C.

    The Breton legend of Ys, and the occasional rising of its cathedral from the waves, gave rise to one of Debussy's most graphic musical impressions. All of the composer's genius for picture painting is used in depicting the watery scene, the majesty of the cathedral rising and then sinking back under the sea.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £39.50

    Honorary March of Her Majesty Queen Sonja - Svein H. Giske

    This march was commissioned by The office of cultural affairs in Fana and Ytrebygda (a part of Bergen Municipality) for the opening of The Bergen Light Rail.The premiere was given by The Norwegian Navy Band Bergen and Smoras skolemusikkduring the light rails maiden voyage. Her Majesty Queen Sonja of Norway opened the light rail on June 22nd 2010.My idea was to give the march a strong link to Bergen. In the bass solo (letter B) I have quoted Bergens "national"anthem Nystemtn and in the Trio (letter E) I have used a bugle call from Bergens unique tradition of archerchery brigades. The first part of the march is meant to have a sort of train feel to it; somethingthats moving steadily through thestreets of the city.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £19.99

    The Catskills - Nigel Hess

    In upstate New York lie the Catskill Mountains - an extraordinary combination of tranquillity and power, peace and majesty. Once seen they call you back again and again. This brass band transcription has been made by PhillipLittlemore and explores the sonorous and warm sounds of the brass band. The Catskills is the second movement of East Coast Pictures, originally written for wind band, and was commissioned in 1985 by the British Youth WindOrchestra with funds from National Westminster Bank plc. These three short ‘pictures’ were inspired by several visits by the composer to a small part of the USA’s East Coast, an area that provides greatextremesin the geography and the people.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £19.99

    The Catksills - Nigel Hess - Phillip Littlemore

    In upstate New York lie the Catskill Mountains - an extraordinary combination of tranquillity and power, peace and majesty. Once seen they call you back again and again. This brass band transcription explores the sonorous and warm sounds of the brass band. The Catskills is the second movement of East Coast Pictures , originally written for wind band. The other two movements are Shelter Island and New York . Item Code: 0-571-56429-1 Duration: c.5'40" Grade: 3rd Section and above

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £38.00

    Finale from Symphony No. 2 (The Resurrection) - Mahler, G - Harper, P

    One of the most life-affirming pieces of music ever composed, Mahler’s 2nd Symphony, subtitled ‘The Resurrection’, was first performed in Berlin in 1895. Mahler’s interest in the mysteries of the afterlife is well-known and is a recurring theme throughout all his nine symphonies. Philip Harper has arranged the final passages of the 2nd Symphony, which begins with a profound hymn set to the words of Friedrich Klopstock— ‘Rise again, yea, thou shalt rise again’.  The music contains one of Mahler’s magical transitionary passages, building in intensity, before the hymn is restated in all its majesty at the moment of glorious resurrection. This arrangement was performed as the finale to Cory Band’s winning Brass in Concert programme in 2012.Listen to Cory BandCourtesy of World of Brass

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £89.95

    INFINITY (Brass Band Set) - Robert Redhead

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £10.00

    INFINITY (Brass Band Study Score) - Robert Redhead

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £89.95

    Infinity (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Redhead, Robert

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days
  • £44.95

    Infinity (Brass Band - Score only) - Redhead, Robert

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 working days