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  • £19.50

    In The Pines - Traditional - Max Stannard

    Whilst the song may not be familiar with some, this traditional American folk song is believed to date back to the 1870’s. With various other titles including ‘Where Did You Sleep Last Night?’ and ‘Black Girl’, this work has been recorded by numerous artists over the years and was in 1993, introduced to a new generation when it was performed by the US band, Nirvana. Max Stannard’s haunting setting brings your audience in with the haunting melody before shifting gears into a great jazz-waltz section. Featuring several soloists, this is a great entertainment items and a good showcase for concerts and contests.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £65.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Tintagel.mp3The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Lyonesse.mp3The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need – hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.https://www.morthanveld.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/The-Once-Future-King-Badon-Hill.mp3

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £30.00

    Mars, The Bringer of War - Phillip Littlemore

    Holst first became interested in astrology around 1912/13 and so began the gestation for a series of pieces that would utlimately become the suite The Planets . The suite itself was written between 1914 and 1916 and with the exception of Mercury , which was written last, Holst wrote the music in the sequence we now know them, and thus did not present the inner planets of Mercury, Venus and Mars in their planetary order. So, in 1914, came the insistent rhythmic tread of Mars, The Bringer of War . It is widely known that the sketches were completed prior to the outbreak of the First World War, so the music is less a reaction the the declaration of war itself, but more an impending sense of inevitability of a war to unfold. Even though Holst would not have known whether war would be declared as he wrote the music, it is almost certain that the news at the time would have had some influence on the music itself. Its insistent 5/4 rhythm, coupled with the winding melody line, the juxtaposition of keys such as D flat and C major all point to a sense of forboding. Item Code: TPBB-050 Duration: 7'20"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £21.50

    Poppy Fields - David Crowe

    It was while looking out upon the twelve-thousand graves at the Tyne Cot memorial, of which over eight-thousand commemorate the lives of unknown soldiers, that the composer felt compelled to compose a piece which encapsulated the feeling of bothpeaceful serenity and great loss that one has when visiting such a place. Throughout the work, images of the 'Last Post' are heard in the distance, as the music reflects upon the catastrophic events which took place in Europe and around the world during the first part of the twentieth-century. Under this hauntingly familiar melody, a simple hymn-like chorale plays and is soon heard overlapped with the opening material in an attempt to unite the feeling of calm and of pain that a place of great remembrance such as Tyne Cot invokes within us all. *note ? the opening Marimba part can be substituted for Xylophone/Vibraphone to create a sustained sound

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £19.50

    Staff Of Faith - Swiss Traditional - Gavin Somerset

    No concert programme is complete these days without a hymn tune being given the treatment that only a brass band sound can deliver. It is therefore refreshing when a lesser known work becomes available for bands to perform. This Swiss traditional melody has grown in popularity over the last decade and is heard in churches across the globe sang to the words ‘My Faith It Is An Oaken Staff’ by Thomas Lynch. This setting by Gavin Somerset uses the full colours of the brass band spectrum and allows several instrumentalists the chance shine in this warm and entertaining work with a big finish ending.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £34.95

    Over The Horizon - Christopher Bond

    For Soprano Cornet & Brass Band, written for & Commissioned by Steve Stewart & Cory BandOver the Horizon (2017), whilst both harmonically and compositionally a simple endeavour, is a spine-tingling beautiful melody for soprano cornet. Based on the painting seen in the sleeve notes of Steve Stewart's album of the same name, the work takes its inspiration from the open expansiveness of the ocean, glistening in the moonlight as four people sit quietly - two parents, a boy, and a girl. A feeling of heartfelt longing throughout the work which is developed both melodically and texturally by soloist and accompaniment; perhaps reflecting the desire to know indeed what is over the horizon. The longing intensifies with a climatic section of grandeur - a feeling of longing which arguably isn't resolved until that all-important - and high - last note.Over The Horizon was written for and commissioned by Steve Stewart and Cory Band in Spring 2017.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £34.95

    Over the Horizon - Christopher Bond

    Soprano Cornet Solo with Brass BandOver the Horizon (2017), whilst both harmonically and compositionally a simple endeavour, is a spine-tingling beautiful melody for soprano cornet. Based on the painting seen in the sleeve notes of Steve Stewart’s album of the same name, the work takes its inspiration from the open expansiveness of the ocean, glistening in the moonlight as four people sit quietly - two parents, a boy, and a girl. A feeling of heartfelt longing throughout the work which is developed both melodically and texturally by soloist and accompaniment; perhaps reflecting the desire to know indeed what is over the horizon. The longing intensifies with a climatic section of grandeur - a feeling of longing which arguably isn't resolved until that all-important - and high - last note.Over The Horizon was written for and commissioned by Steve Stewart and Cory Band in Spring 2017.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £60.00

    Danceries

    In Danceries , by Kenneth Hesketh, the melodies themselves are a mixture of old and new. Where the old occurs it has been adapted in mood and composition and is often interspersed with completely new material. The contemporary harmonies and rhythms bring a breath of new into these themes and add drama to the suite. The first movement, Lull Me Beyond Thee , is gentle and lilting, almost a barcarole, this movement is very much a reverie. The original tune had the name ‘Poor Robin’s Maggot’, a rather disconcerting title; maggot, however, in seventeenth-century parlance meant whim or fancy. The second, Catching of Quails , is a colourful, buoyant scherzo on an original melody. The thematic material is shuttled around the band to contrast with full-blooded tuttis. The last few bars fade to almost nothing, before a final surprise! My Lady’s Rest is a tender pavane, also on an original melody, with Moorish leanings. Beautiful solo passages, expressive contrapuntal writing and warm tuttis provide an opportunity to show off the most lyrical of playing. The final movement, Quodling’s Delight is a clever combination of the 17th century melody, 'Goddesses', with an original contrasting melody, creating a rousing and exuberant finale to the work. A sound clip of the last movement, Quodling's Delight , can be found here Item Code: 0-571-56512-3 Duration: c.15'40"

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £24.95

    Lloyd (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Howard, Cuthbert - Coles, Bramwell

    The first presentation of the theme can be used for the purpose of accompanying congregational singing. At Section A the second presentation of the tune appears in the key of the dominant, the melody being given throughout to Solo Horn, with First Horn, First Trombone, Soprano and Flugel reinforcing the melody in the various phrases. Incidentally, see that the players do not break these phrases; it should be possible to take the four bars in one breath quite easily. Take due care of the light and shade which should be delicately applied. In the last bar the music gathers strength as we pass back into the original key for the last verse; pay particular attention to the part allotted to Second Baritone and Euphonium which needs to be slightly stressed. For the last appearance of the tune at Section B the full Band is used, apart from the third phrase which is given solo by Solo Comet with a light accompaniment above a bass pedal. Notice the rit. operating from the end of the eleventh bar and also the short swell effect on the fourth beat of the fourteenth bar.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £12.50

    Lloyd (Brass Band - Score only) - Howard, Cuthbert - Coles, Bramwell

    The first presentation of the theme can be used for the purpose of accompanying congregational singing. At Section A the second presentation of the tune appears in the key of the dominant, the melody being given throughout to Solo Horn, with First Horn, First Trombone, Soprano and Flugel reinforcing the melody in the various phrases. Incidentally, see that the players do not break these phrases; it should be possible to take the four bars in one breath quite easily. Take due care of the light and shade which should be delicately applied. In the last bar the music gathers strength as we pass back into the original key for the last verse; pay particular attention to the part allotted to Second Baritone and Euphonium which needs to be slightly stressed. For the last appearance of the tune at Section B the full Band is used, apart from the third phrase which is given solo by Solo Comet with a light accompaniment above a bass pedal. Notice the rit. operating from the end of the eleventh bar and also the short swell effect on the fourth beat of the fourteenth bar.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days