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  • £24.95

    Taps In Tempo (Xylophone Solo) - Jan Berenska

    This piece was written for the Welsh percussionist Leslie Lewis, pupil of the legendary Ernest Parsons.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £79.95

    Waiting for a Pain Hit!??!!? - Paul McGhee

    Waiting For a Pain Hit!??!!? was written during November and December 2006 as an entry in the 2006/07 Swiss Brass Band Association Composers Competition. It was later chosen as the Championship Section set test piece for the 2010 Swiss National Brass Band Championships.The piece originates from sketches for a Brass Quintet which was written whilst I was in my second year of studies at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. The piece, now being much more elaborate both musically and structurally than the original, aims to explore the many various textures available to a large brass ensemble. The aims of the piece, from its earliest stages, were mainly exploration of textures as well as dealing with issues of continuity and whilst the piece certainly contains challenging technical elements, they were not a driving force behind its inception and more organically grew from the primary aims of the piece. I was purposefully looking throughout the writing and editing process to create a piece of music with a seamless, ethereal quality to both the structure and the musical content.There are no 'performance directions' throughout the piece, the reasoning for this is explained below. However, I have spent much time and thought over the tempo markings throughout the piece and the tempos throughout the piece are the desired tempi and care should be taken with these. The tempo markings contained throughout the piece form a vital part of the structure and affect the continuity of the piece. Metronome marks contained within a box show the tempo of the new section in relation to the tempo that precedes it by use of metronome modulations. Any alterations tothe tempo of the section that precedes it will alter the boxed metronome marks.The title of a piece of music, please forgive my generalisation, is to give an insight into 'what a piece is about'. I suppose that this piece is no different, but with the title being slightly abstract I shall resist the temptation to reveal what it means to me. The title, I feel, needs to be open to interpretation along with the music within. That's the way, with this piece especially, I like my music to be. Freedom to find our own meaning and a way to express it from within the score is vital. It is only then that the piece can take on its own identity and grow in ways that even I might not have imagined, revealing different sides to its personality with each performance.Before the music begins I have included some text. Do these words hold the key to the music?! Can they help??!I DON'T KNOW!!!I just like the rhythms, the pulse and the imagery. Hopefully all of this can help to create a picture. But let it be your picture...Paul McGhee, June 2010.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £25.00 £25.00
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    Fanfare for the Future - Andrew Stevenson

    Fanfare for the Future was commissioned by the organisers of the annual Madhurst Brass Festival 2012 to open the final concert. The title pays homage to the James Watson Memorial Fund, the choice charity of the event, which gives opportunities to young brass players. The piece opens with an epic fanfare featuring the cornets and trombones and the remaining instruments join gradually. The music then shifts gear into an exciting, fast tempo. This section features different time signatures, tricky technical passages and some of the initial motifs from the start return. The music then slows down for a melodic euphonium solo followed by a cornet solo which gradually builds to an emotional climax. The music gains tempo for a final sprint to the end, where the music finishes with a climax of rich chords and fanfares.

  • £21.50

    Bewitched - Howard Greenfield - Gavin Somerset

    In 1964, the pilot to the new American sitcom 'Bewitched' was completed. The original screening used Frank Sinatra's 'Witchcraft' as the music for the opening titles, however, the production company did not want to pay the large fee to use this track and so, Greenfield & Keller were asked to compose an alternative. The foot-tapping swing piece they produced was reduced to an instrumental version with a light orchestra for the opening credits. However, the song has now been recorded several times. The most famous recording by Steve Lawrence was also featured in the film 'Bewitched' released in 2005. Since then, it has also appeared on the X-Factor a number of times. This fantastic swing item now comes arranged for brass band with the option of playing it at the Steve Lawrence song tempo, or the fast, big band instrumental tempo used in the TV Series. An optional, lower pitched part is also included between letters E-F for the cornet section & flugel to make the item more accessible to lower section bands. This item is a great swing number that audiences of all ages will recognize, a great piece for your new program & a must for every band looking to inject some life into their concerts.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £21.50

    Wedding Music (Selections For A Wedding) - Various - Gavin Somerset

    With more and more brass bands performing at weddings, having the correct music is essential for the couple's perfect day. With most of the traditional wedding music coming from large overtures & operas etc, this unique pack of music has been specially designed to minimise fuss (all 4 pieces are printed on just one sheet per part) and have just the "famous" bits included. Specially arranged by Gavin Somerset so that the pieces included can be performed from anything ranging from a full brass band to a brass quintet group and with repeats that can be cut or performed to tailor to each event. The pieces are...BRIDAL CHORUS (from Lohengrin) By Richard Wagner"Here comes the bride"... is the standard march played for the bride's entrance at many formal weddings. The wedding between Elsa and Lohengrin however was almost an immidiate failure!PACHELBEL'S CANON By Johann PachelbelFormally known as the Canon & Gigue in D and originally composed for a string quartet, the Canon part of the composition has become a favorite at weddings, either as an alternative to the Bridal Chorus (above) or used during the signing of the register. The convention in the Baroque era would have been to play a piece of this type in the moderate to fast tempo, however at weddings it has become fashionable to play the work at a slow tempo.WEDDING MARCH (from "A Midsummer Night's Dream") By Felix MendelsshonPopularized by Princess Victoria's wedding to Prince Frederick William of Prussia and coupled with the Bridal Chorus for the entry of the bride, this Wedding March is often for the recessional at the end. Prelude to "Te Deum" By Charpentier Another item now popular in its use during weddings for its bright fanfares. Many composers have written music to the "Te Deum" text (Te Deum being an early Christian hymn of praise, used still regularly in the R.C Church). The prelude by Charpentier is by far one of the most famous

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £69.00

    Ross Roy - Jacob de Haan

    In this composition, Jacob de Haan sees the "Ross Roy" as a metaphor for the years spent at school (a monument in time), where one's personality is formed. So, the opening theme the artist calls the Ross Roy theme initially has monumental characteristics.The rhythmic motion, which strides along in the lower register and percussion at the beginning of the next section is typical of "Tempo di Marcia". This movement, accompanied by repetitions of sound, is a metaphor for the structure and discipline in school. This is the introduction to a march theme, symbolic of "passing through" the classes up to the final examinations.Then, the Ross Roy theme is dealt with again, now in a playful, humorous variation. As if the composer is saying there should also be time for a smile in school. The same theme can be heard in major key and a slower tempo in the following section, expressing pride and self-confidence. This is also the introduction to the expressive middle section that represents love, friendship and understanding.We then return to the march theme in a slightly altered construction. The oriental sounds, constituting the modulation to the final theme, are symbols of the diversity of cultures in the school. The characteristic final theme first sounds solemn, but turns into a festive apotheosis. It is no coincidence that the final cadence is reminiscent of the close to a traditional overture, for the school years can be considered the "overture" to the rest of one's life.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £37.00

    Sumba Samba - Ron Gilmore

    The Samba is a Latin American dance, which is mostly associated with parties, as a result of the fast tempo in which it is usually played. 'Sumba Samba' forms an exception to this rule. In order to get this samba to swing it is important to stick to the tempo prescribed. 'Sumba Samba' starts with a motif which will play an important role throughout the piece. This motif can be heard in the first notes of the 'refrain' and, as said before, has been used in the introduction, as well as in the transition after the middle part (letter G). Furthermore, it plays an important role in the middle part itself (letter E), in which the samba has momentarily disappeared and a completely different atmosphere has been created. At letter H we pick up where we left off with the samba and swing to the end of this composition.

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days

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  • £29.95

    Rondo Alla Turk - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Rondo Alla Turk has been a popular concert piece for many performers the world over. This is an arrangement I have done for solo xylophone that shows off the technical dexterity of both the piece and the instrument. Starting in a brisk tempo, the soloist performs the main themes of the piece with the major key fanfare-like interludes introducing each new section.The main melody from the opening returns with an even brighter tempo that takes the soloist into a flamboyant cadenza section. The cadenza section is scored out for the xylophone but the ad-lib marking allows the soloist in true Mozart fashion to improvise (if they wish) the cadenza section which leads into the finale.The finale brings back the major key motifs from the opening to a coda section that concludes in a breathless flurry from the soloist.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £15.00 £15.00
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    Brass Quintet No. 1 - Andrew Stevenson

    Brass Quintet No. 1 was written for the Ewald Brass Quintet, a group of first year musicians from the Royal Northern College of Music. The piece is in three movements in the typical fast-slow-fast structure. The first movement is the hardest of the 3, the quick tempo and multiple time changes make the music tricky but very exciting. The second movement is a slow melodic movement, packed with emotion and opportunities for ensembles to add their own musicality to it.The third movement goes through many different styles and gives every player a chance to show their technical abilities and melodic playing.