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  • £49.95

    The Dark Side of the Moon - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    This piece was commissioned by Dr. Nicholas Childs and Black Dyke Band on behalf of Rotary International and received its world premi?re performance at St. David's Hall, Cardiff on Saturday 27th January 2007. It is dedicated to the composer's father, Harry Cooper.The music was selected by the National Contesting Council as the 3rd section test piece for the 2008 Regional Brass Band Championships of Great Britain.A Note from the Composer...Have you ever thought of a holiday destination, tourist attraction, event, place, site or period in history and thought 'I wonder what it would be like?' - somwhere you have never been and can only let your imagination run wild on. What would the place be like, and all the things surrounding it such as the mood, feelings you get experiencing it, the temperature? Who would be there and what you would see? This piece is my musical imagination of the dark side of the moon. I know from news reports, the internet and other footage that the moon is a very desolate place, very barren and rugged. So from the start the piece gives the listener a musical picture of the rugged landscape with little light and warmth.However, the one place that has had me thinking about is the side of the moon that we don't see in our night skies, the side of the moon with no sun and no light pollution from civilisation. I can only imagine the eeriness one would feel being stood in complete darkness on the moon's surface looking around.As you slowly explore the surroundings and your eyes drift up to the night sky, there is an awesome sight unfolding in front of you - countless stars and galaxies, planets and different solar systems and all right in front of you glistening from the light of the sun beaming from the other side of the moon. The Dark Side of the Moon portrays a musical picture of the whole experience as seen in my imagination taking the listener from the rugged landscape to the awesome beauty that sits endlessly in front of you.Paul Lovatt-Cooper, September 2007

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £12.50

    Moon Song, Sun Dance - Philip Sparke

    Moon Song, Sun Dance was commissioned by flugel horn virtuoso, Claude Romailler, and premiered by him at the Swiss National Solo and Quartet Championships in April 2012.As the title implies, the work is in two contrasting movements, which can be performed separately or together.Moon Song opens with a flowing modal theme, which the soloist embellishes before the band takes centre stage. A central section brightens the mood with a new melody over the lightest of accompaniments; this is once again developed by the soloist until the original theme reappears, played by the band. This introduces a cadenza for the soloist which either closes the movement, or can be extended to link directly to the second movement.Sun Dance is a vivace 6/8 scherzo which opens with a flourish from the band. The soloist then introduces the main theme, which in turn is taken up by the band. A short bridge passage heralds a change of key and a new melody from the soloist. A brief central interlude then introduces a change of meter and recalls the main melody of Moon Song, before a recapitulation leads to a florid coda, which brings the work to a close.Solo part: difficulty 5

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £49.95

    The Dark Side Of The Moon - Score & Parts - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    This piece was commissioned by Dr. Nicholas Childs and Black Dyke Band on behalf of Rotary International and received its world premi?re performance at St. David's Hall, Cardiff on Saturday 27th January 2007. It is dedicated to the composer's father, Harry Cooper.The music was selected by the National Contesting Council as the 3rd section test piece for the 2008 Regional Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. A Note from the Composer...Have you ever thought of a holiday destination, tourist attraction, event, place, site or period in history and thought 'I wonder what it would be like?' - somwhere you have never been and can only let your imagination run wild on. What would the place be like, and all the things surrounding it such as the mood, feelings you get experiencing it, the temperature? Who would be there and what you would see? This piece is my musical imagination of the dark side of the moon. I know from news reports, the internet and other footage that the moon is a very desolate place, very barren and rugged. So from the start the piece gives the listener a musical picture of the rugged landscape with little light and warmth.However, the one place that has had me thinking about is the side of the moon that we don't see in our night skies, the side of the moon with no sun and no light pollution from civilisation. I can only imagine the eeriness one would feel being stood in complete darkness on the moon's surface looking around.As you slowly explore the surroundings and your eyes drift up to the night sky, there is an awesome sight unfolding in front of you - countless stars and galaxies, planets and different solar systems and all right in front of you glistening from the light of the sun beaming from the other side of the moon. The Dark Side of the Moon portrays a musical picture of the whole experience as seen in my imagination taking the listener from the rugged landscape to the awesome beauty that sits endlessly in front of you.Paul Lovatt-Cooper, September 2007

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £24.95

    The Dark Side Of The Moon - Score Only - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    This piece was commissioned by Dr. Nicholas Childs and Black Dyke Band on behalf of Rotary International and received its world premi?re performance at St. David's Hall, Cardiff on Saturday 27th January 2007. It is dedicated to the composer's father, Harry Cooper.The music was selected by the National Contesting Council as the 3rd section test piece for the 2008 Regional Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. A Note from the Composer...Have you ever thought of a holiday destination, tourist attraction, event, place, site or period in history and thought 'I wonder what it would be like?' - somwhere you have never been and can only let your imagination run wild on. What would the place be like, and all the things surrounding it such as the mood, feelings you get experiencing it, the temperature? Who would be there and what you would see? This piece is my musical imagination of the dark side of the moon. I know from news reports, the internet and other footage that the moon is a very desolate place, very barren and rugged. So from the start the piece gives the listener a musical picture of the rugged landscape with little light and warmth.However, the one place that has had me thinking about is the side of the moon that we don't see in our night skies, the side of the moon with no sun and no light pollution from civilisation. I can only imagine the eeriness one would feel being stood in complete darkness on the moon's surface looking around.As you slowly explore the surroundings and your eyes drift up to the night sky, there is an awesome sight unfolding in front of you - countless stars and galaxies, planets and different solar systems and all right in front of you glistening from the light of the sun beaming from the other side of the moon. The Dark Side of the Moon portrays a musical picture of the whole experience as seen in my imagination taking the listener from the rugged landscape to the awesome beauty that sits endlessly in front of you.Paul Lovatt-Cooper, September 2007

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    The Golden Apples of the Sun - Rodney Newton

    This work was commissioned in 2012 by the percussionist, Yasuaki Fukuhara, and takes its title from the final verse of W.B.Yeats' poem, The Song of Wandering Aengus;Though I am old with wandering,Through hollow lands and hilly lands,I will find out where she has gone,And kiss her lips and take her hands;And walk among long dappled grass,And pluck till time and times are done,The silver apples of the moon,The golden apples of the sun.This piece does not seek to follow the narrative of the poem, but rather takes lines from it as an inspiration for three contrasting movements.The first movement, Through Hollow Lands and Hilly Lands, is in the form of a dogged march over a repeated bass line, featuring tom-toms, snare drum and cymbals playing rhythms associated with rock drumming. At the end of the movement, the marimba enters with material that will be heard in the next movement.The second movement, The Silver Apples of the Moon, features vibraphone, glockenspiel and crotales, as well as the dobachi (a resonant bronze bowl of Japanese origin). The music is delicate and ethereal.In contrast, the final movement, The Golden Apples of the Sun, is energetic and fiery, featuring tubular bells, timpani and other tuned percussion instruments including cowbells.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £61.00

    Moon Song, Sun Dance - Philip Sparke

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    NEW WORLD DANCES (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Ellerby, Martin

    Duration: 8:17Includes: Earth Dance; Moon Dance; Sun Dance.Recorded on QPRL085D Vistas

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    NEW WORLD DANCES (Brass Band - Score only) - Ellerby, Martin

    Duration: 8:17Includes: Earth Dance; Moon Dance; Sun Dance.Recorded on QPRL085D Vistas

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £82.00

    Pines of Rome (Complete Version), The - Respighi, O.

    A NEW EDITION is now in preparation and will be issued at the British Brass Band Championships on October 10th 2015. See NIGEL and MARY DURNO at the JUST MUSIC stand, where it will be available for inspection and for sale. The arranger has made some very small revisions and corrections and is confident that this new presentation will be very welcome. It can now be ordered on this site as usual, but delivery will be held until the new edition is available. The manuscript version is now withdrawn.Pines of the Villa Borghese - Children are at play in the pine groves of Villa Borghese; they dance round in circles. They play at soldiers, marching and fighting, excited by their own cries, they come and go in swarms like swallows in the evening.The Pines close to a Catacomb - Suddenly the scene changes -- we see the shades of the pine trees fringing the entrance to a catacomb. From the depth rises the sound of a mournful chant, floating through the air like a solemn hymn, and gradually and mysteriously dispersing.The Pines of the Gianicolo. The evening air is warm: the pine-trees of the Janiculum hill stand distinctly outlined in the clear light of the full moon as it looks out over the city of Rome below. A nightingale is heard singing.Pines of the Appian Way - It's a misty dawn on the Appian Way, solitary pine trees guarding the landscape. The muffled, marching tread of footsteps becomes louder and louder. Trumpets sound and, in the brilliance of the newly-risen sun, a consular army marches forth along The Sacred Way, finally ascending in triumph to the Capitol to celebrate "A Triumph."

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £35.00

    Ascension - Lucy Pankhurst

    A major work written for the RNCM Brass Festival Competition 2005, and inspired by the nature of Ascension – creating a Musical depiction of the spiritual journey towards enlightenment, sanctuary and ultimate inner peace.As aninitial muse for this work, the ‘Tibetan Singing Bowl’ is utilised with the Brass Band in order to represent this path to Serenity, together withBaoding Balls(Chinese Health Balls) to mark the point of Final Ascension.Programme notes from the composer, Lucy Pankhurst:Ascension is a Musical depiction of the Spiritual Journey towards enlightenment, sanctuary and ultimate inner peace.As my initial muse for this work, the Singing Bowl is utilised with the Brass Band in order to represent this path to Serenity. “Tibetan” Singing Bowls date back to the 8th Century A.D., originating in the pre-Buddhist shamanic Bon Po culture in the Himalayas and are still used in modern Monasteries. The original purpose of them still remains a mystery, with accounts stating that it is forbidden to disclose the true function of the Bowls, as the “secrets of sound” yield so much Power, that they must be kept hidden.Listening to the tones created by the Singing Bowl effectively silences the internal dialogue of the listener, making it an excellent tool for Meditation, Centering and entering trance-like states. In Buddhism, as with many cultures, sound is an important part of Spiritual Practice. There are 9 methods to reach Enlightenment in the Buddhist Doctrine ; the seventh is SOUND.These Bowls are used by Healers in a similar way to help balance the body’s residual energies. The Bowls are usually made from seven different sacred metals, intended to correlate directly to the seven sacred “Planets” : GOLD (Sun), SILVER (Moon), MERCURY (Mercury), COPPER (Venus), IRON (Mars), TIN (Jupiter), ANTIMONY (Saturn). Any one Bowl can create up to seven different frequencies (tones) simultaneously. In Healing, the Singing Bowl is played whilst balanced on the palm of the hand, struck three times to stabilise the surrounding energies, before rotating the wooden “beater” around the outer circumference of the Bowl to create the “singing” effect.I have included an optional Vibraphone part (to be played with a Double Bass Bow) with Tubular Bells, to be used only in performances where a Singing Bowl cannot be acquired. However, a traditional Bowl should be used whenever possible, to create this specific and unique sound.Baoding Balls or Chinese Health Balls are also utilised in this work. Their appearance in the Music here, however, is to mark the point of Final Ascension, where the music reaches its ultimate goal. These delicate cloisonne iron Balls are said to stimulate the acupressure points on the hand, thus improving the Chi and Energy Paths (Life Force) throughout the entire body. The delicate “tinkle” produced by these spheres is hypnotic and captivating. For this reason, where no Baoding Balls are obtainable for performance, only delicate metallic percussion should be used in replacement (i.e. Crotales, Antique Cymbals or (liberal) single strikes on a Triangle etc.). Bell Trees, Wind Chimes and Cow Bells should not be used.As in many cultures, the number three is important in Ascension, as it represents not only the purification from the Singing Bowl, but also it is a number of confirmation, reiterated throughout the music in the metallic percussion in addition to the Brass, re-affirming the correct path to Enlightenment.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days