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  • £59.99

    I'm Still Standing - Elton John

    I'm still standing is another way of saying "You haven't beaten me yet" and is an ode to stamina. This world famous song by Elton John has been arranged by newcomer Sven Van Calster. The stirring rhythm and the infectious famous melody enable this piece to be played at any concert, irrespective of the level of your orchestra. Always a topper!

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

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  • £61.99

    I'm Still Standing

    Estimated dispatch 10-14 working days

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  • £44.95

    Deliverance (from War of the Worlds Suite) (Soprano Cornet or Tenor Horn Solo with Brass Band)

    Deliverance is the fourth movement of the suite War of the Worlds which was commissioned by the Senzoku Gakuen College of Music Saxophone Orchestra and first performed by them in the Maeda Hall, Japan on June 29 2012, the composer conducting. The music is dedicated to Professor Shin-ichi Iwamoto. The transcription for brass band was first performed by the Brighouse & Rastrick Band, conductor David King, in the Bridgewater Hall Manchester on September 8 2012.The suite takes inspiration from the 1953 film script adaptation of the famous HG Wells novel and key scenes from the film are set as individual movements: Deliverance - survivors seek sanctuary in the Church of Santa Maria, still standing among the burning ruins of Los Angeles, and pray for deliverance from the invaders.Each movement of War of the Worlds is available separately allowing for a variety of "mini-suite" combinations eg: Movements 1,2 and 5 or 3,4 and 5 etc.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £34.95

    Song of the Night Sky - Christopher Bond

    Orpheus is known as the most talented music player of the ancient times. It is said that god Apollo was his father, from whom took his extreme talent in music, and the Muse Calliope was his mother. Tragedy struck when his wife, Eurydice stepped on a viper which in turn bit her, injecting its fatal venom. Nothing could stop his cries of anguish and sheer pain and sorrow upon realizing his beautiful Eurydice was dead. Orpheus decided to go into the Underworld to get his wife back. Apollo, his father, would talk to Hades, the god of the Underworld to accept him and hear his plea. And so Orpheus set off into the Underworld and was warned that for no reason must he look back while his wife was still in the dark, for that would undo everything he hoped for. As Orpheus was reaching the exit of the Underworld, he could hear the footfalls of his wife approaching him. As his was approaching the exit, his heart was beating faster and faster. The moment he stepped on the world of the living, he turned his head to hug his wife. Unfortunately, he got only a glimpse of Eurydice before she was once again drawn back into the underworld. When Orpheus turned his head, Eurydice was still in the dark, she hadn't seen the sun and, was drowned back to the dark world of the dead. Waves of anguish and despair swept over him and shuddering with grief he approached the Underworld again but this time, he was denied entry, the gates were standing shut and god Hermes, sent by Zeus, wouldn't let him in. His songs were no more joyful but extremely sad. His only comfort was to lay on a huge rock and feel the caress of the breeze, his only vision were the open skies. Song of the Night Sky was recorded by Tom Hutchinson and the Cory Band in June 2015, featuring on his debut solo album.

    Estimated dispatch 5-10 working days
  • £34.95

    Song of the Night Sky (Cornet Solo)

    Cornet Solo with Brass BandOrpheus is known as the most talented music player of the ancient times. It is said that god Apollo was his father, from whom took his extreme talent in music, and the Muse Calliope was his mother. Tragedy struck when his wife, Eurydice stepped on a viper which in turn bit her, injecting its fatal venom. Nothing could stop his cries of anguish and sheer pain and sorrow upon realizing his beautiful Eurydice was dead. Orpheus decided to go into the Underworld to get his wife back. Apollo, his father, would talk to Hades, the god of the Underworld to accept him and hear his plea.And so Orpheus set off into the Underworld and was warned that for no reason must he look back while his wife was still in the dark, for that would undo everything he hoped for. As Orpheus was reaching the exit of the Underworld, he could hear the footfalls of his wife approaching him. As his was approaching the exit, his heart was beating faster and faster.The moment he stepped on the world of the living, he turned his head to hug his wife. Unfortunately, he got only a glimpse of Eurydice before she was once again drawn back into the underworld. When Orpheus turned his head, Eurydice was still in the dark, she hadn't seen the sun and, was drowned back to the dark world of the dead. Waves of anguish and despair swept over him and shuddering with grief he approached the Underworld again but this time, he was denied entry, the gates were standing shut and god Hermes, sent by Zeus, wouldn't let him in.His songs were no more joyful but extremely sad. His only comfort was to lay on a huge rock and feel the caress of the breeze, his only vision were the open skies.Song of the Night Sky was recorded by Tom Hutchinson and the Cory Band in June 2015, featuring on his debut solo album.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £39.50

    Edward Gregson: Fanfare for a New Era (for Brass Band)

    DescriptionComposer's NoteThe Fanfare has been designed to be partly antiphonal, with four separate brass 'choirs' initially playing their own music, and so some spatial separation is desirable. Soprano and solo cornets should be placed centrally, standing behind the rest of the band - or in some venues could even be placed off-stage in a side balcony, but still close to the band. If the Fanfare is played by a contesting size band, one of the solo cornets should play the 1st cornet part together with the usual player ie the number of players on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd cornet parts should be equal. Otherwise the number of players in each of the two cornet 'choirs' is at the discretion of the conductor. The Tubular Bells accompanying the cornets 1-3 group should be placed close to that group. See inside back cover for suggested band formation.The style of playing should replicate that of symphonic brass, with a minimum of vibrato and with long notes being sustained without decaying.Programme NoteCommissioned in 2020 by Youth Brass 2000, Fanfare for a New Era was designed to be partly antiphonal - thus the separation of the band into four brass 'choirs', each with their own percussion accompaniment. First, soprano and solo cornets, rather like heraldic trumpeters, announce the main idea, majestic in character. Then horns, baritones, and euphoniums, with timpani, enter with stately figurations. Next, the heraldic trumpeters usher in trombones and tubas, to the accompaniment of tom-toms and snare drum, presenting a faster and rhythmic dance-like theme. Finally, the remaining cornets amplify the pealing of bells. All four elements then come together, surrounding the audience with a 'joyful noise' of festive brass and percussion.The original symphonic brass version of this fanfare can be purchased as part of a set of Three Fanfares HERE.For more information on Edward Gregson's music please visit the composer's website: www.edwardgregson.com

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £10.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need - hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.Performance NotesWhere space and practicality permits the opening movement should be played with cornets and trombones standing behind the band facing the audience; they should retake their seats for the second and third movements.PercussionConcert Bass Drum (ideally NOT Kit/Pedal Bass Drum), Suspended Cymbal, pair of Clash Cymbals, Glockenspiel, Snare Drum, Tambourine, 2 x Timpani (Eb-G, Bb-D), 2 x Tom-toms, Triangle, Tam-Tam* (only if available), Tubular Bells *(only if available).MutesBaritones, all cornets and trombones will require metal straight mutes; all trombones and cornets will require cup mutes.*The Once and Future King was set as the test-piece for the 3rd section of the Swiss National Championships in 2007. The score was then slightly revised in July 2008, the main alteration being the exclusion of the tubular bells part for the Regional Championships of Great Britain in 2009. Some parts which were optional (or cued on other instruments) at the request of the Swiss Brass Band Association were restored to their original octaves and instruments. In 2015 the tubular bells part was restored in the optional Percussion 3 part; all parts in Percussion 3 are optional, although some are cued in the percussion 1 & 2 parts (and the cues should be played if only two players are available).Listen to a preview and follow along with the score below!

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days