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  • £24.95

    Lake of Tenderness - Ben Hollings

    Ben Hollings provides a delicate, atmospheric concert work utilising extended harmony reminiscent of modern choral composers such as Eric Whitacre. The work is technically modest, consisting of sustained chords interspersed with moving crotchet lines and lyrical solo contributions, and is accessible to bands of all levels.The work takes its title from ‘Lacus Lenitatis’ - one of the Latin named basaltic plains on the earth’s moon, thought by early astronomers to be lakes. Atmospheric in nature, the music seeks to evoke imagery of the solitary moon in the still of space. As we all know, simple music is often the most effective, and this is certainly the case here. Hollings’ chordal and lyrical writing creates a truly beautiful work that would be welcome in any concert programme.Lake of Tenderness was commissioned by Dr. Robert Childs and premiered by Grimethorpe Colliery Band at the 2015 Brass in Concert Festival, at The Sage, Gateshead.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £44.95

    TRAILBLAZERS (Brass Band Set) - Andrew Mackereth

    This overture draws its inspiration from the story of the first Household Troops Band. It tells the story of the 1887 band, the subsequent lull of nearly a hundred years and the re-awakening of the Troops phenomenon in 1985. It was originally written in 1995 and featured prominently by the band on its North American tour of 2002. Given the history of the Household Troops Band, it is fitting that this composition is preoccupied with marching. It begins with a marching song played by a solitary muted cornet, symbolic not only of the call to bandsmen to join the evangelical effort but also a muso-dramatic device to indicate the steady increase in members and technical ability! The music quickly develops into stirring versions of 'A robe of white' and 'Storm the forts of darkness' with two early day Salvation Army tunes crucially adding to the narrative; 'Marching on in the light of God' and 'Soldiers of our God, arise!' The second section is a reflective setting of the Herbert Booth song, 'The penitent's plea'. This song serves to represent the many people who were 'saved' during those early day campaigns. The expressive music transports the listener through a period of uncertainty and angst until finally reaching the song, 'There is a message, a simple message, and it's a message for us all'. The final section deals first with the emergence from the annals of history with the muted cornet figure again before, symbolically, the present day band bursts forth with an emphatic statement of 'Would you be free from your burden of sin? There's power in the blood'. The stirring climax represents a fitting tribute to those gallant pioneering musicians and their equally impressive and dedicated contemporaries.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £42.50

    March from Pines of Rome (N?4) & Prelude (N?1), The - Respighi, O.

    THIS IS A NEW EDITION. The arranger has made some very small revisions and corrections and is confident that this new presentation will be very welcome. It can now be ordered on this site as usual. The manuscript version of the March has now been withdrawn.'Pines of the Villa Borghese' - Children are at play in the pine groves of Villa Borghese; they dance round in circles. They play at soldiers, marching and fighting, excited by their own cries, they come and go in swarms like swallows in the evening.The March - 'Pines of the Appian Way' - It's a misty dawn on the Appian Way, solitary pine trees guarding the landscape. The muffled, marching tread of footsteps becomes louder and louder. Trumpets sound and, in the brilliance of the newly-risen sun, a consular army marches forth along The Sacred Way, finally ascending in triumph to the Capitol to celebrate "A Triumph."Other products you may be interested in...TitleComposer/AuthorCategory/ScoringPricePines of Rome (Complete Version), TheRespighi, O.?82.00Polotsvian Dances (complete)Borodin, A.?45.00Procession to the MinisterWagner, R.?44.50Roman Festivals (complete)Respighi, O.?62.50

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £82.00

    Pines of Rome (Complete Version), The - Respighi, O.

    A NEW EDITION is now in preparation and will be issued at the British Brass Band Championships on October 10th 2015. See NIGEL and MARY DURNO at the JUST MUSIC stand, where it will be available for inspection and for sale. The arranger has made some very small revisions and corrections and is confident that this new presentation will be very welcome. It can now be ordered on this site as usual, but delivery will be held until the new edition is available. The manuscript version is now withdrawn.Pines of the Villa Borghese - Children are at play in the pine groves of Villa Borghese; they dance round in circles. They play at soldiers, marching and fighting, excited by their own cries, they come and go in swarms like swallows in the evening.The Pines close to a Catacomb - Suddenly the scene changes -- we see the shades of the pine trees fringing the entrance to a catacomb. From the depth rises the sound of a mournful chant, floating through the air like a solemn hymn, and gradually and mysteriously dispersing.The Pines of the Gianicolo. The evening air is warm: the pine-trees of the Janiculum hill stand distinctly outlined in the clear light of the full moon as it looks out over the city of Rome below. A nightingale is heard singing.Pines of the Appian Way - It's a misty dawn on the Appian Way, solitary pine trees guarding the landscape. The muffled, marching tread of footsteps becomes louder and louder. Trumpets sound and, in the brilliance of the newly-risen sun, a consular army marches forth along The Sacred Way, finally ascending in triumph to the Capitol to celebrate "A Triumph."

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £34.95

    FIVE LYRIC PIECES (Brass Band) - Grieg, Edvard - Freeh, Mark

    1. Norwegian Melody 2. Evening in the Mountains 3. Puck 4. Solitary Traveller 5. Hailing-Norwegian Dance. Suitable 4th section and above

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    Trailblazers (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Mackereth, Andrew

    This overture draws its inspiration from the story of the first Household Troops Band. It tells the story of the 1887 band, the subsequent lull of nearly a hundred years and the re-awakening of the Troops phenomenon in 1985. It was originally written in 1995 and featured prominently by the band on its North American tour of 2002. Given the history of the Household Troops Band, it is fitting that this composition is preoccupied with marching. It begins with a marching song played by a solitary muted cornet, symbolic not only of the call to bandsmen to join the evangelical effort but also a muso-dramatic device to indicate the steady increase in members and technical ability! The music quickly develops into stirring versions of 'A robe of white' and 'Storm the forts of darkness' with two early day Salvation Army tunes crucially adding to the narrative; 'Marching on in the light of God' and 'Soldiers of our God, arise!' The second section is a reflective setting of the Herbert Booth song, 'The penitent's plea'. This song serves to represent the many people who were 'saved' during those early day campaigns. The expressive music transports the listener through a period of uncertainty and angst until finally reaching the song, 'There is a message, a simple message, and it's a message for us all'. The final section deals first with the emergence from the annals of history with the muted cornet figure again before, symbolically, the present day band bursts forth with an emphatic statement of 'Would you be free from your burden of sin? There's power in the blood'. The stirring climax represents a fitting tribute to those gallant pioneering musicians and their equally impressive and dedicated contemporaries.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £22.50

    Trailblazers (Brass Band - Score only) - Mackereth, Andrew

    This overture draws its inspiration from the story of the first Household Troops Band. It tells the story of the 1887 band, the subsequent lull of nearly a hundred years and the re-awakening of the Troops phenomenon in 1985. It was originally written in 1995 and featured prominently by the band on its North American tour of 2002. Given the history of the Household Troops Band, it is fitting that this composition is preoccupied with marching. It begins with a marching song played by a solitary muted cornet, symbolic not only of the call to bandsmen to join the evangelical effort but also a muso-dramatic device to indicate the steady increase in members and technical ability! The music quickly develops into stirring versions of 'A robe of white' and 'Storm the forts of darkness' with two early day Salvation Army tunes crucially adding to the narrative; 'Marching on in the light of God' and 'Soldiers of our God, arise!' The second section is a reflective setting of the Herbert Booth song, 'The penitent's plea'. This song serves to represent the many people who were 'saved' during those early day campaigns. The expressive music transports the listener through a period of uncertainty and angst until finally reaching the song, 'There is a message, a simple message, and it's a message for us all'. The final section deals first with the emergence from the annals of history with the muted cornet figure again before, symbolically, the present day band bursts forth with an emphatic statement of 'Would you be free from your burden of sin? There's power in the blood'. The stirring climax represents a fitting tribute to those gallant pioneering musicians and their equally impressive and dedicated contemporaries.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score and Parts - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score Only - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days