Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 36 matches for your search

Results

  • £34.99

    Sing Sing Sing (Score & Parts) (Brass Band/Score & Parts) - Louis Prima

    , written in 1936 by Louis Prima, has become one of the definitive songs of the big band and Swing Era. Although written by Prima, it is often most associated with Benny Goodman. Easily accessible to concert audiences due to its big beat and showy drum breaks structure, this arrangement by Mark Freeh is a welcome inclusion in any concert programme.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £46.00

    The Night To SIng (Score only) - Bramwell Tovey

    The piece takes its inspiration from the VE Day celebrations of 1945. On 8 May 1945 the end of the war in Europe was celebrated in Great Britain. VE day (Victory in Europe day) gave rise to extraordinary public celebrations all over the country, from street parties to services of thanksgiving, to impromptu singing and community music-making. Contemporary reports mention Victorian ballads and Edwardian music hall songs, as well as the latest popular craze - the Conga. Festivities continued until dawn whereupon, finally surrendering to fatigue, the remnants of the crowd headed home on foot, long after the last bus. Some felt the celebrations to be inappropriate - much of Europe lay in ruins and war still raged in Asia. Almost everyone lamented the loss of somebody who had not survived. Duration: 16:50

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £19.95

    Fire in the Blood - Score Only - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Fire in the Blood was commissioned by Dr Stephen Cobb for the 120th anniversary of the International Staff Band of the Salvation Army. The piece was composed for the celebration concert where the ISB were joined by several other staff bands from around the world to perform independently to a sell-out capacity crowd at Britain’s most famous concert hall The Royal Albert Hall. Fire in the Blood received its world premier at the ‘ISB 120’ concert at the Royal Albert Hall on June 4th 2011.With this piece I wanted to acknowledge music that had an impact on me through my Salvation Army upbringing. When thinking of a title for this piece I had no hesitation than to reflect and re-word the Salvation Army’s motto under their famous crest ‘Blood and Fire’.When composing Fire in the Blood I wanted to use three songs of worship that have been prevalent in the Salvation Army’s services over a number of years. Opening with Richard Phillips’ setting of Psalm 95, ‘Sing for Joy’, the music is vibrant and full of energy, I wanted to capture the spirit of the well known words of Scripture. The music then moves into a more reflective section that includes Howard Davies’ emotive song melody ‘Lord, you know that we love you’ and Laurie Klein’s worship song ‘I love you Lord’.A re-statement of the opening Psalm setting follows and this, in turn, leads into a dramatic and powerful finale that combines two pivotal statements drawn from the slower, reflective section: I love you lord, and I lift my voice to worship you, O my soul rejoice and Lord, you know that we love you with a final flourish from Psalm 95: Come let us sing joy to the Lord!Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    The Ellacombe Chronicles (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Curnow, James

    This piece was commissioned by Brass Band of Columbus for the occasion of the band's 25th anniversary in 2009. It is dedicated to current and former members of the band and its founding Director, Dr Paul Droste. The hymns of Isaac Watts (1674 - 1748) have been a source of inspiration for musical thought and development by composers for over 200 years. His glorious hymn 'I sing the mighty power of God' has been coupled with the hymn tune 'Ellacombe' in many hymnals over these two centuries. This work was created and inspired by Isaac Watts's text and chronicles the three verses of the hymn through a set of diverse variations on the hymn tune 'Ellacombe'. The opening fanfare is intended to capture the joy and exuberance of the first phrase of the first verse, 'I sing the mighty power of God that made the mountains rise'. The developmental material following the fanfare gives a hint of the three large variations that are extracted from the tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    The Ellacombe Chronicles (Brass Band - Score only) - Curnow, James

    This piece was commissioned by Brass Band of Columbus for the occasion of the band's 25th anniversary in 2009. It is dedicated to current and former members of the band and its founding Director, Dr Paul Droste. The hymns of Isaac Watts (1674 - 1748) have been a source of inspiration for musical thought and development by composers for over 200 years. His glorious hymn 'I sing the mighty power of God' has been coupled with the hymn tune 'Ellacombe' in many hymnals over these two centuries. This work was created and inspired by Isaac Watts's text and chronicles the three verses of the hymn through a set of diverse variations on the hymn tune 'Ellacombe'. The opening fanfare is intended to capture the joy and exuberance of the first phrase of the first verse, 'I sing the mighty power of God that made the mountains rise'. The developmental material following the fanfare gives a hint of the three large variations that are extracted from the tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £38.00

    Hymns at Heaven's Gate (Score only) - Elgar Howarth

    A flourish: a crowd assembles at the gate of Heaven, saints and sinners. As in a film the immensity of the crowd is illustrated, and the camera zooms to focus onparticular groups and individuals. Monks sing a 'medieval' hymn, interrupted by the fanfares of mischievous seraphim; gradually the whole crown join in. The fanfares grow wilder, and grubby, naughty children enter, singing mock fanfares, making jazzy gestures and trying to sing a chirldren's hymn. They are joined by roughnecks who take up the fanfare idea. The camera zooms again at the entrance of Jesus. A commanding flourish causes consternation. Separate groups react, interrupted by mysterious percussion effects. Then, as the whole panorama explodes in sound, William Booth (founder of the Salvation Army) approaches awestruck. A triple Alleluia is followed by the third hymnand further Alleluias. A dance finale begins using material from the whole piece. A tumultuous climax preceds sudden quiet Alleluias, and the crown exits into Heaven to the music of the monks, reharmonised and transformed. The camera shots extend to the heavens and the stars. Duration: 15:00

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £65.00

    Rise of the Phoenix (Brass Band - Score & Parts) - Darrol Barry

    As the title suggests, the phoenix was a fabulous mythical bird, who every morning at dawn, sang a song so enchanting that even the sun God, Apollo, would stop and listen. The bird would live for a hundred years, and at the end of its life, would build a pyre, set it on fire and be consumed by the flames. After three days, the phoenix would be reborn from the ashes, to sing once more.This work was commissioned by Clifton and Lightcliffe Band and reflects the difficulties and rebirth of the band to make music once more.Suitable for second section bands and above.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £27.50

    Rise of the Phoenix (Brass Band - Score Only) - Darrol Barry

    As the title suggests, the phoenix was a fabulous mythical bird, who every morning at dawn, sang a song so enchanting that even the sun God, Apollo, would stop and listen. The bird would live for a hundred years, and at the end of its life, would build a pyre, set it on fire and be consumed by the flames. After three days, the phoenix would be reborn from the ashes, to sing once more.This work was commissioned by Clifton and Lightcliffe Band and reflects the difficulties and rebirth of the band to make music once more.Suitable for second section bands and above.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Mansions of Glory - Score & Parts - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    The Mansions of Glory - Score Only - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days