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  • £29.50

    Brass Monkey's Christmas - Gavin Somerset

    With so many bands now using the Brass Monkeys publications with their training bands, this latest release of the 'Brass Monkeys' series is our largest to date and includes a variety of works from the festive season. In this substantial publication of music, simple carols are included that can be performed to accompany an audience singing, or as standalone items. Some novelty choices of music have been included too. The 'Little Drummer Boy' is designed to give your budding percussionist the limelight they've craved all year around, whilst 'O Holy Night' will teach your front row the importance of the 12/8 time signature. Of course, no Christmas compilation would be complete without 'Jingle Bells' & 'We Wish You A Merry Christmas'. This publication will ensure your Brass Monkeys are not left out in the cold this Christmas! Music included is...AWAY IN A MANGER (Cradle Song)HARK, THE HEARALD ANGELS SING (Mendlesshon)LITTLE DRUMMER BOY (Carol Of The Drum) aA" playable without percussionIN THE BLEAK MIDWINTER (Cranham)JINGLE BELLSWHILE SHEPHARDS WATCHED (Winchester Old)O HOLY NIGHTWE WISH YOU A MERRY CHRISTMAS

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days
  • £21.50

    Only You - Vincent Clarke - Andrew Keegan

    Originally beginning life as a joke item, this track was to feature on Kylie Minogue's 2015 Christmas album. James Corden & Kylie Minogue have been good friends since hosting the BRIT awards in 2009 and upon completing the recording, record producers took a liking to it and elevated the song to single status. The piece makes a great cornet/horn duet and although was initially released for a Christmas album, it is not a Christmas song. Light accompaniments and a simple, beautiful melody ensure this new duet will be a hit with players and audiences alike. *Soprano Cornet solo part included as an extra to perform as a Soprano/Horn Duet.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £19.50

    Silent Stars Go By - R.V Williams - Gavin Somerset

    The title "The Silent Stars Go By" is the 4th line from the very popular carol "O Little Town Of Bethlehem". Arranged now as a simple cornet solo, the melody is brought out by both the soloist and the band is such a way, that this simply melody can warm hearts on the coldest of nights. This is a fantastic item for all cornet players and playable by most levels of bands, perfect also for the younger soloist. For Christmas 2020, we have made backing tracks of this title for you to download. These can be used either for personal playback use, or to create a virtual performance of the piece with your full band. To download the backing track, please RIGHT CLICK HERE & Save As .

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

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  • £24.95

    The Pilgrim's Prayer (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Rouse, Sydney - Ball, Eric

    Introduction - This could hardly be more simple. Inexperienced players may have some little difficulty in intonation, especially as they are starting 'cold', but a useful lesson can be learned in this connection when rehearsing these two bars. Section A - The music is hymn tune-like in character, but it should not become stilted. Close intonation is still a point to study, especially in view of the chromatic nature of some of the harmony. Section B - Aim to secure just balance in the accompanying parts, especially in the second phrase, where the 1st comets may be inclined to treat their moving part as an independent melody rather than part of the 'colour' background. Section C -This is a reprise of the first theme, with a different arrangement. The same comments apply, however. Section D - Here the music becomes more song-like in style, and provides an interesting contrast. The scoring, too, is more varied, and there are a number of points that call for attention. Note that the 1st and 2nd comets and 2nd trombone work as a team throughout; see that the pulsating, syncopated background adds to the movement of the music without giving a jerky effect; the new entries in the fourth and twelfth bars are to be made quite smoothly; and do not allow the texture of the music, especially in the last eight bars of the section, to overshadow the simplicity of the main tune. Section E - Here the first subject appears again. In the arrangement the colour contrasts are quite clear-cut. In order to secure true balance in the fifth and sixth bars, it may be necessary to adjust the amount of tone given by the bass trombone, as this part is not doubled as are the other parts. Section F -This section forms a simple but expressive coda.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £12.50

    The Pilgrim's Prayer (Brass Band - Score only) - Rouse, Sydney - Ball, Eric

    Introduction - This could hardly be more simple. Inexperienced players may have some little difficulty in intonation, especially as they are starting 'cold', but a useful lesson can be learned in this connection when rehearsing these two bars. Section A - The music is hymn tune-like in character, but it should not become stilted. Close intonation is still a point to study, especially in view of the chromatic nature of some of the harmony. Section B - Aim to secure just balance in the accompanying parts, especially in the second phrase, where the 1st comets may be inclined to treat their moving part as an independent melody rather than part of the 'colour' background. Section C -This is a reprise of the first theme, with a different arrangement. The same comments apply, however. Section D - Here the music becomes more song-like in style, and provides an interesting contrast. The scoring, too, is more varied, and there are a number of points that call for attention. Note that the 1st and 2nd comets and 2nd trombone work as a team throughout; see that the pulsating, syncopated background adds to the movement of the music without giving a jerky effect; the new entries in the fourth and twelfth bars are to be made quite smoothly; and do not allow the texture of the music, especially in the last eight bars of the section, to overshadow the simplicity of the main tune. Section E - Here the first subject appears again. In the arrangement the colour contrasts are quite clear-cut. In order to secure true balance in the fifth and sixth bars, it may be necessary to adjust the amount of tone given by the bass trombone, as this part is not doubled as are the other parts. Section F -This section forms a simple but expressive coda.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £80.00

    St. Magnus - Kenneth Downie

    Dedicated to Alastair Massey, an inspirational music teacher. Commissioned by the Scottish Brass Band Association for the 2004 European Brass Band Championships in Glasgow. This music is a set of variations on the tune known as St Magnus, which is attributed to Jeremiah Clarke. Most people will associate it with Thomas Kelly's hymn which begins: "The Head that once was crowned with thorns is crowned with glory now". The tune is very simple, consisting of just two, four-bar phrases. Neither is there much in the way of rhythmic variety, every note being a crotchet with the exception of two quavers, and the last note in each phrase. Within such a simple structure, however, lies considerable strength. THEME The listener is given the opportunity of hearing it twice, in full, at the beginning, starting with one player but soon taken up by the full ensemble. It returns in the middle of the music and is stated again near the end. This has been done quite deliberately in the hope that there will be an appreciation of what material is being developed, by the listener as well as by those with access to the score, who are able to see the visual connections. VARIATION 1 This takes the rhythm of the last part of the theme and also uses the shape of the opening as a recurring figure. The mood is whimsical and skittish, with short, teasing rhythmic figures tossed around the band, and quick interplay with percussion, at a fast tempo. An energetic flourish finishes this variation before the Andante espress. VARIATION 2 This commences with chords related to the opening of Variation 1. The cantabile on solo comets establishes a new, lyrical mood and there is scope for expressive playing in a series of short solo passages. The theme works its way unobtrusively into the texture before a reprise of the solo cornet melody and some more lyrical interchanges between Eb bass, euphonium, flugel horn and comets. The variation ends serenely with clear references to the last phrase of the theme. VARIATION 3 The first idea to dominate is clearly linked to the shape of the theme's first phrase. There is a frenetic feel to much of this variation, with considerable energy and instability created by extensive use of cross-rhythms. A thinning-out of the score marks a clear change to development of the start of the second phrase of the theme. This proves to be short-lived however, and the opening material returns leading to a restatement of the theme, "Maestoso," after which a euphonium cadenza links to Variation 4. VARIATION 4 Here we have some solos for euphonium, cornet, trombone and Eb bass set against a background of horns and baritones presenting a pensive statement of the theme's opening. VARIATION 5 This commences Allegro, with lively work for cornet and euphonium spreading to the whole band before attention focuses on the beginning of the second phrase of the theme which is initially presented in diminution, then in regular rhythm, then in inversion. An increase in tempo coupled with a decrease in volume, requires dexterity and control, with several metrical challenges thrown in for good measure. The same fragment of phrase becomes an ostinato which generates a frenzied climax, punctuated by short, dramatic silence, before the opening figure returns and the music gradually winds down. The tubular bells herald the final return of the theme, in augmentation, marking the start of the Finale. FINALE This features the running semiquavers of the previous variation sounding in counterpoint. A fast, furious coda speeds the work to a conclusion while references to the opening of the theme are still trying to break into the texture of the music. Kenneth Downie

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days
  • £69.95

    Transformation (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £69.95

    TRANSFORMATION (Brass Band Set) - Kenneth Downie

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £69.95

    Transformation (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Downie, Kenneth

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £34.95

    Transformation (Brass Band - Score only) - Downie, Kenneth

    I believe in transformation, God can change the hearts of men, And refine the evil nature, till it glows with grace again'. So wrote John Gowans in the second verse of his great hymn, 'I believe that God the Father, can be seen in God the Son', written specifically to affirm Salvationists' beliefs. It is sung to the tune Bethany and in seeking to explore this great subject at the heart of the Christian gospel in musical terms, the composer has used this fine tune as the basis. Although it never appears in its entirety, it is seldom out of the picture and much of the work is derived from it. The other main source of material is the lovely, simple chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him, changed to heavenly beauty, when his face I see'. This chorus is especially prominent in the middle section but there are important references to it throughout. There are also brief references to Charles Wesley's hymn, 'Love Divine' and, in particular, the telling lines, 'Changed from glory into glory, till in Heaven we take our place'. The work suggests that, at times, the process of being transformed is a struggle, portrayed with many passages of fraught and demanding music. Considerable reserves of stamina and technique are required while, in contrast, the chorus, 'Some day I shall be like him' provides the warm, gentle centre of the work. The premiere of the work was given by The International Staff Band of The Salvation Army in Cadogan Hall on Friday 3rd June 2011, as part of the band's 120th anniversary celebrations.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days