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  • £58.00

    The Drunken Sailor - English Traditional

    Estimated delivery 10-12 days
  • £35.60
  • £27.50

    Sailor Songs - Rimmer, W

    Includes a full band set (no score)

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £35.00

    A Suffolk Prelude - Andrew Duncan

    Written for the Ipswich & Norwich Co-Op Band, A Suffolk Prelude is based around five traditional tunes from Suffolk:‘Nutting Time’,‘Blackberry Fold’,‘Cupid’s Garden’,‘A Seaman’s Life’‘The Bold Richard’The piece begins on the percussion and timpani alone leading through a crescendo into the first statement of the fanfare which is derived from a motif from the tune ‘Nutting Time’. This leads into a playing of the ‘Nutting Time’ tune which is then developed as the tune is passed around the band.‘Nutting Time’ is a jolly lighthearted tune about a ‘fair maid’ who meets a handsome young farmer called ‘Johnny’ when out gathering nuts in the wood. After a pause on the tubular bells the slow tune ‘Blackberry Fold’ is presented as a solo for Flugel Horn, then as a full band version.‘Blackberry Fold’ is a touching song about a Suffolk squire who gets married well below his station to a beautiful milkmaid, simply because he loves her! They live happily ever after.The next tune to be heard is the juanty ‘Cupid’s Garden’ played firstly as a solo on the Euphonium, and again this is about the subject of love. This song is sung from a sailors prospective and he tells how he met a lovely maiden and has promised to marry her when he returns from duty at sea.The trombones then play the noble tune ‘A Seaman’s Life’. This tune seems to serve as a warning to young girls about the fickle nature and the total unsuitability of marrying a sailor! ‘Oh a seaman’s life is a merry merry life, they’ll rob young girls of their heart’s delight, they will leave them behind for to sail one morn, but they never know when they’ll return’. Despite this it is a fine tune!The last tune featured is ‘The Bold Richard’ which is played by all the bass instruments in the band. This is a song telling how the Royal Navy friggate ‘The Bold Richard’ went to battle against a French friggate destroying her and taking her crew as prisoners.Suffolk Prelude goes on to feature a slow version of the tune ‘A Seaman’s Life’ played alongside a fast version of the tune ‘Cupid’s Garden’. The opening fanfare then returns leading into a final coda section.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days