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  • £58.10

    Carnaval Romain - Hector Berlioz

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days

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  • £64.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score and Parts - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Benvenuto Cellini - Score Only - Hector Berlioz

    One of Berlioz's ill-fated operas, Benvenuto Cellini was first produced at the Paris Opera in September 1838. It was withdrawn as a failure after only four performances. Neither did the solitary performace given at Covent Graden some fiftenn years later, in the presence of Queen Victoria and Price Albert, meet with any greater success. But when in 1888 it was produced at Dresden it was acclaimed by the Germans as a triumph. The Carl Rosa Opera did much to revive interest in the work.Adapted from certain episodes recorded in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini, Tuscan sculptor and goldsmith, the story laid in Rome during the mid-sixteenth century is not strictly historical.Berlioz must have been well pleased with this opera despite its ealy failure. Not only did he include in the overture several of its themes - a not unusual pracitce - but he fashioned another overture with its material as well - the great Le Carnaval Romain.The short opening Allefro marked deciso con impeto is conceived in the most brilliant Berlioz manner, utilizing full instrumentation. In the Larghetto, we meet at once the first of the opera themes - the Cardinal's aria (from the last act) introduced in the bass, quasi pizzicato. A second melody leads to a resumption of the Allegro, the contrasting second subject in the tenor horns being an adaption of Teresa's aria (Act 1). Towards the end, the 'Cardinal'theme is re-introduced by trombone fortissimo against an energetic florid cornet and euphonium passage (seneza stringendo - without hurry, says the score).After a unison passage storming skywards, there is a sudden dramatic three-bar silent pause broken by Eb basses alone, again stating the 'Cardinal' theme. A simple molto cresendo on the dominant, begun piano, leads to the final long, resounding chord.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £90.00

    Across the Ocean (Bra) - Pimpanit Karoonyavanich

    After "The Poseidon" and "A Journey to The Bermuda Triangle", "Across The Ocean" is the third composition that inspired Pimpanit by her favorite sea painting of Romain Steppe, a Belgian painter who lived in the 19th century (1859-1927). It depicts 3 different images of the sea connected to the emotion of sailors. The first part gives the mixed feelings between agitation and excitement reflecting the turbulent sea which is challenging for the sailors to discover the new land. The second part reflects the beautiful calm sea when the sun sets. That gives warm and romantic feelings but hidden with loneliness especially for the sailors who travel far away from home and miss their loved one. Then the image suddenly changes to the angry sea with rain and storm in the third part. To end the first part's theme comes back declaring that the adventure starts again!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £116.00

    A Journey to The Bermuda Triangle (Bra) - Pimpanit Karoonyavanich

    After Karoonyavanich has seen her favourite seaview painting by Romain Steppe (1859-1927) for the first time, she was directly inspired and started to write "A Journey to The Bermuda Triangle".

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £85.00

    The Poseidon (Bra) - Pimpanit Karoonyavanich

    In Greek mythology "Poseidon" is the god who reigns over the sea, the waters and their gods. The opening of this work reflects the power of Poseidon. He could turn a calm sea into a rough and turbulent sea that swallows up ships. With his famous trident he can generate an earthquake, hence his nickname "Earth Shaker". Every living being is afraid of him, including his wife and children. Deep inside, however, he feels lonely. The middle part of this work shows the other side of Poseidon as a normal person who desires for love and understanding. However, this sad but sweet theme doesn't last long because its angry character resurfaces. He starts again to use his power in an aggressive way and the powerful opening theme is repeated. After "A Journey to The Bermuda Triangle", this is the second work in which the composer has drawn her inspiration from her favourite seascape painting by the Belgian painter Romain Steppe (1859-1927).

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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