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  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry; John Anderson, Mary Campbell and Douglas Graham.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £19.50

    Auld Lang Syne - Traditional - Max Stannard

    The ionic words of Robert Burns were set to the tune of a traditional folk song and ever since, its popularity in English speaking countries has grown continuously. Traditionally sung to welcome in the New Year, this arrangement by Max Stannard suits all festive occasions and can be used as a moving encore to your Christmas concert programme this year.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £34.95

    Ae Fond Kiss (Tenor Horn Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Burns, Robert - Graham, Peter

    Ae Fond Kiss, by the Scottish poet Robert Burns, is widely recognised as being one of the most poignant songs of lost love ever written. A brief affair with a Mrs Agnes Craig McLehose (known to Burns as Nancy) ended with her decision to join her estranged husband in Jamaica. Her parting gift to Burns was a lock of her hair which he had set in a ring. His gift to her included the poem, the first verse of which reflects Burns' feelings of resignation and despair:Ae fond kiss, and then we sever;Ae fareweel, alas, for ever!Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee,Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £6.95

    Auld Lang Syne - Menno Haantjes

    Whereas 'Auld Lang Syne' may be considered the best-known Scottish song ever, yet at the same time it is an obscure one, for there are but few people who know the complete text by heart. After the familiar 'Should auld acquaintance be forgot .....' many people take their refuge to lyrics like 'rum tee dum ta dee ..... lah, lah, lah ........... for auld lang syne'. Even in Scotland only a handful of persons know the entire text and are able to give a correct rendering of it. The current lyrics have been attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Burns, however, he did not write the whole poem : after he had heard an old man sing the centuries-old Scotch ballad, he wrote it down and added a number of stanzas (1788). Historical research teaches us that the ballad served many purposes, both political and religious. Nowadays, 'Auld Lang Syne' is sung as a Christmas Carol and it is also sung on New Year's Eve at the turning of the year. Apart from that, though, the song is also sung on many other occasions - sometimes with different lyrics, which usually have Love, Friendship and/or Parting as their themes, as these go well with the fascinating melody. In this arrangement a low-sounding solo instrument is central. The harmonization in the accompaniment fits in perfectly with the sentiments this song will evoke. Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind? Should auld acquintance be forgot. And days of auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne, We'll take a cup of kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £64.95

    A British Isles Suite - Jonathan Bates

    A British Isles Suite is a musical exploration of poetry from around the British Isles. Each movement takes inspiration from a quote of literature specific to the country in question. The work is written in a symphonic style with a moderately paced opening movement, a slow and expressive second movement, a lively two-part minuet and a grand finale.I - Scotland "When chill November's surley blast, make fields and forest bare" - from Man Was Made To Mourn by Robert BurnsII - Wales "Though lovers be lost, love shall not" - from And Death Shall Have No Dominion by Dylan ThomasIII Isle of Man "Make us free as thy sweet mountain air" - from the Isle of Man National Anthem by William GillIV Ireland "How do we tell the dancer from the dances?" - from Among School Children by William Butler YeatsV England "Be not afraid of greatness" - from Twelfth Night by William ShakespeareA British Isles Suite was selected as the test piece for the 4th Section final of the National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain 2012

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £34.95

    The Smoke That Thunders - Andrew Wainwright

    David Livingstone was a Scottish missionary and explorer. From 1841 until his death in 1873, Livingstone explored the interior of central and southern Africa. His initial aim was to spread Christianity and bring commerce and ‘civilisation' to these regions, but his later missions were more concerned with exploration. This piece of music tells the story of the part of his journey that led to him discovering Victoria Falls.The work starts out in optimistic fashion, with the Scottish folk-song A Man's a Man for a', by Robert Burns, which Livingstone reportedly used to hum on his travels. The troubles and difficulties of his journey were great and the next section describes his battles with the local African tribes, who were suspicious of his motives.After surviving these assaults, numerous bouts of African fever and several skirmishes with wild animals, a more reflective section ensues, which describes the doubts Livingstone had about continuing his mission. This is epitomised by the hymn Lord, Send Me Anywhere, which Livingstone himself wrote.After much deliberation and prayer, Livingstone decided to carry on and the final section describes his journey along the Zambezi River, the triumphant sounds eliciting his elation at discovering the magnificent Victoria Falls, or as it is known by the locals, "Mosi-oa-Tunya", The Smoke That Thunders.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £24.95

    Ye Banks And Braes - Traditional - Rodney Newton

    This melody is purported to have been written in 1788 by a Charles Miller who expressed a desire to compose an authentic Scots air. The words associated with the tune are by Robert Burns and tell the tale of a young woman who is spurned by her lover who leaves her alone to bring up their child.This reflective arrangement for euphonium solo with brass band accompaniment was made at the request of David Childs.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £27.00

    Auld Lang Syne (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wilkinson, Keith M.

    It is a tradition in most English-speaking countries to sing this song at the stroke of midnight on New Year's Eve to usher in the New Year. The words are at least partially written by Robert Burns and the words "Auld Lang Syne" literally mean "old long ago" or "the good old days", providing a moment of reflection before moving forwards into the New Year.The tubular bells, although pitched, sound midnight when they enter at bar 10.This arrangement was prepared for Brass Band of the Western Reserve, musical director Keith M Wilkinson, to perform at First Night, Akron, Ohio, December 31st, 2007. The following choreography is suggested:Commence the performance with all the cornets scattered around the auditorium.At the end of bar 18 invite the audience to sing along with the band.At bar 27 the cornets move to stand in front of the other members of the band to lead to the stirring conclusion. Should auld acquaintance be forgot and never brought to mind?Should auld acquaintance be forgot and days of auld lang syne?For auld lang syne, my dear, for auld lang syne,We'll take a cup of kindness yet, for auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £32.00

    Ye Banks and Braes (Trombone Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wilkinson, Keith M.

    The origins of this melody are unknown but, set to the poem by Robert Burns, this has become one of the most popular Scottish songs.This arrangement was prepared at the request of Brett Baker for one of his many visits to perform as a soloist with Brass Band of the Western Reserve and its musical director Keith M Wilkinson. It has been recorded by Brett with BBWR on the CD Slides Rule!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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