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  • £21.50

    Masters In This Hall - Trad. French Carol - Elizabeth Carter

    Based on an old French carol, and inspired by such TV series as Downton Abbey and Pride and Prejudice, the arrangement aims to depict the servants of a well-to-do household preparing for the return of their Master and his family to enjoy Christmas at the Hall. As they go about their tasks, we hear appropriate well known carols interwoven with the main theme. Deck the Hall, Good King Wenceslas, The Wassail Song, The Holly and the Ivy and Oh Christmas Tree are all heard as the servants get into the swing of the season. This is a fastastic festive workout for all areas of the band

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £70.00

    General Series Band Journal December 2016 Numbers 2162 - 2165

    No. 2162 Coronation Fanfare and Intrada (Kenneth Smith)Numerous Scripture verses refer to Jesus as 'King of Kings and Lord of Lords'. In addition, he is described in Revelation 5:13, 7:10 and 21:15 as 'the Lamb who sits upon the throne'. Furthermore we're told in Philippians 2:10-11 that one day 'every knee will bow...and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord'. This arrangement celebrates Jesus' heavenly coronation, bringing together two well-known hymns inviting us to crown Jesus as King.No. 2163 Telling It! (Sam Creamer)A lively, salsa setting of Sidney Cox's well-known song, 'I want to tell what God has done'.No. 2164 The Christ of Calvary (Mervyn Clarke)This arrangement of the much-loved tune 'Annie Laurie', is often associated with Nathan Atkinson Aldersley's words to 'The Christ of Calvary'.No. 2165 Festival March - The Return (Ray Steadman-Allen)The Return was written for the occasion of Chatham corps returning to its refurbished hall.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £35.00 £35.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    Icebreaker

    “Icebreaker” was originally written for Superbrass in March 2012 and recorded in it’s original brass dectet and percussion form on their “Brass Taps” CD. The work begins with tumultuous fanfare, shrouded by thick chords in the lower brass. This fanfare-like material leads to a biting statement from the trombones. An ‘icy’ gritty section, once again played by the trombones grows in energy, punctuated by the return of the fanfares. The horns, providing a little respite, emerge in a quiet restrained line, which is coloured by the rest of the ensemble. Before fully coming to fruition, the horn line is quickly cut-short and subsumed by the sudden return of the energetic material from the other instruments, which grows to the end of the piece.Duration: 4:30 minutesPercussion: 2 players playing drum kit, bass drum and tam-tam.Grade 6: Very Difficult Championship Section Bands

  • £29.95

    Island Whirl - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Island Whirl was commissioned by Margaret Milligan who wanted a brand new piece of music composed as a present for Ian, her husband for his 70th birthday. Ian Milligan is a keen and dedicated musician and he is the musical director of Callendar Brass, based in Callendar near Stirling in Scotland.Margaret contacted me about the possibility of composing a short lively piece which had a Scottish theme that would be ideal for Callendar Brass Band and any other ensemble to get their teeth into. This piece takes its inspiration from the traditional Scottish folk song ‘An Eriskay Love Lilt’ which is a particular favourite of both Margaret and Ian.With thunderous Celtic drums the piece opens in a whirlwind of sound with fanfare brass and an off-stage soloist that can perform using either the cornet or trumpet. After the exciting opening, the brass and drums die away to allow the off-stage soloist to air the traditional tune ‘An Eriskay Love Lilt’.The beautiful haunting melody, keeping its originality throughout undergoes a series of changes in the accompanying harmonic material before dying away to allow the Celtic drums to return. The percussion whip the band into a frenzy as the piece gets faster and faster. Just prior to the final notes the band diminuendo to allow one last closing statement from the Eriskay Love Lilt lead by the off-stage soloist before the ensemble charge to a dramatic close.When performing this piece I would recommend the off-stage soloist taking a position somewhere in the audience, so they can almost feel part of the performance. In addition, with the two tom-tom parts that represent the Celtic drums, bands should make the most of showcasing them by getting the two drummers out to the front of the band to perform. The ideal stage position would be with the players set up in stereo with one player in front of the soprano cornet and the other in front of the solo trombone.With the various choreographed movements from both the off-stage soloist and the percussionists. This piece is a great addition to any concert repertoire and is an ideal showcase for bands who want to try something a little different.I wish Ian at 70 years young, all the very best with his music making in the many years to come and I hope this piece, composed especially for him and Callender Brass brings them many years of musical enjoyment.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    The Year of the Dragon - Philip Sparke

    The highlight of Cory’s centenary celebrations throughout 1984 was a concert held in St. David’s Hall, Cardiff, in March. The band, with the aid of funds provided by the Welsh Arts Council, commissioned Philip Sparke to write a work for first performance at this concert. The result was “The Year of the Dragon” of which the composer writes:“At the time I wrote The Year of the Dragon, Cory had won two successive National Finals and I set out to write a virtuoso piece to display the talents of this remarkable band to the full.”The work is in three movements:TOCCATA opens with an arresting side drum figure and snatches of themes from various sections of the band, which try to develop until a broad and powerful theme from the middle of the band asserts itself. A central dance-like section soon gives way to the return of this theme, which subsides until faint echoes of the opening material fade to a close.INTERLUDE takes the form of a sad and languid solo for trombone. A chorale for the whole band introduces a brief spell of optimism but the trombone solo returns to close the movement quietly.FINALE is a real tour-de-force for the band with a stream of rapid semi-quavers running throughout the movement. The main theme is heroic and march-like but this is interspersed with lighter, more playful episodes. A distant fanfare to the sound of bells is introduced and this eventually returns to bring the work to a stirring close.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £64.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Flowers of the Forest (Brass Band - Score only) - Bennett, Richard Rodney - Hindmarsh, Paul

    In a preface to the score, the composer explains that ‘the folk song The Flowers of the Forest is believed to date from 1513, the time if the battle of Flodden, in the course of which the archers of the Forest (a part of Scotland) were killed almost to a man’. Bennett had already used the same tune in his Six Scottish Folksongs (1972) for soprano, tenor and piano, and it is the arrangement he made then that forms the starting-point for the brass-band piece. A slow introduction (Poco Adagio) presents the folk song theme three times in succession - on solo cornet, on solo cornets and tenor horns, and on muted ripieno cornets in close harmony - after which the work unfolds through five sections and a coda. Although played without a break, each of these five sections has its own identity, developing elements of the tune somewhat in the manner of variations, but with each arising from and evolving into the next. The first of these sections (Con moto, tranquillo) is marked by an abrupt shift of tonality, and makes much of the slow rises and falls characteristic of the tune itself. The tempo gradually increases, to arrive at a scherzando section (Vivo) which includes the first appearance of the theme in its inverted form. A waltz-like trio is followed by a brief return of the scherzando, leading directly to a second, more extended, scherzo (con brio) based on a lilting figure no longer directly related to the theme. As this fades, a single side drum introduces an element of more overtly martial tension (Alla Marcia) and Bennett says that, from this point on, he was thinking of Debussy’s tribute to the memory of an unknown soldier (in the second movement of En Blanc et noir, for two pianos). Bennett’s march gradually gathers momentum, eventually culminating in a short-lived elegiac climax (Maestoso) before the music returns full-circle to the subdued melancholy of the opening. The work ends with a haunting pianissimo statement of the original tune.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Song for the Skies - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Song for the Skies was commissioned by Tuba virtuoso Les Neish and was given its world premier on the December 9th 2010 with the James Madison University Brass Band in Harrisonburg, Virginia, USA.Les asked me to compose a slow melody that highlights the wonderful sonorous sound of the Tuba. I am a big fan of Les and of the instrument and knowing the capabilities of Les as a soloist I wanted to experiment with the range and colour of the instrument in this solo.After a warm introduction from the ensemble the soloist enters almost timeless over the muted cornets. The melody when it is first heard has a somewhat haunting Celtic feel to it. It is intentionally marked as con rubato so that the soloist can really put their own musical stamp on the music. As the haunting melody repeats again this time in a change of key the accompaniment takes more of a role within the piece of music performing counter melodies within this second section.The middle of the piece introduces a new secondary melodic device that serves as an introduction to the original melody played in all its glory by the ensemble. This dies away to leave the second half of the melody in the euphoniums and baritones as the soloist plays a soaring counter melody in the highest register of the instrument.The piece starts to return home with a recapitulation of the introduction followed by the second part of the original melody by the soloist. After a momentary reflective solo from the soloist the introduction is used for a final time before the tuba guides us home to conclude.For the soloist, there are a number of occasions where the opportunity to play in the upper register of the instrument arises. However, I have also given the opportunity for the soloist to play various passages down the octave so it suits the performers playing style and range.Song for the Skies is very simple yet beautiful and I feel it suits the playing of the Eb Tuba perfectly. I hope you enjoy performing it.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £55.00 £55.00
    Buy from IMAS Music

    Plus Ultra - Andrew Stevenson

    Plus Ultra was commissioned for the Intermediate section of the 2015 National Youth Championships of Great BritainPlus Ultra is based on the twelve labours of Hercules, in particular the tenth. During the completion of this labour, Hercules had to split a mountain apart and sail into an unknown part of the world. By splitting the mountain, he connected the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea and formed the Straight of Gibraltar. One part of the split mountain is Gibraltar and the other is Monte Hacho. These two mountains taken together have since then been known as the Pillars of Hercules.The Pillars appear as supporters of the coat of arms of Spain. The motto Plus Ultra (Latin for further beyond) is closely associated with the Pillars of Hercules to mark the edge of the then known world. According to mythology, the pillars bore the warning "Non plus ultra" (nothing further beyond) serving as a warning to sailors and navigators to go no further.The music in Plus Ultra depicts the struggle of the tenth labour, the dividing of the mountain, the mystery of what lies beyond the known world and the triumphant return of Hercules after completing the task.

  • £20.00 £20.00
    Buy from IMAS Music

    Plus Ultra (Score Only) - Andrew Stevenson

    - SCORE ONLY -Plus Ultra was commissioned for the Intermediate section of the 2015 National Youth Championships of Great BritainPlus Ultra is based on the twelve labours of Hercules, in particular the tenth. During the completion of this labour, Hercules had to split a mountain apart and sail into an unknown part of the world. By splitting the mountain, he connected the Atlantic Ocean to the Mediterranean Sea and formed the Straight of Gibraltar. One part of the split mountain is Gibraltar and the other is Monte Hacho. These two mountains taken together have since then been known as the Pillars of Hercules.The Pillars appear as supporters of the coat of arms of Spain. The motto Plus Ultra (Latin for further beyond) is closely associated with the Pillars of Hercules to mark the edge of the then known world. According to mythology, the pillars bore the warning "Non plus ultra" (nothing further beyond) serving as a warning to sailors and navigators to go no further.The music in Plus Ultra depicts the struggle of the tenth labour, the dividing of the mountain, the mystery of what lies beyond the known world and the triumphant return of Hercules after completing the task.