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  • £55.50

    Resolution - Hartmann

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £21.50

    Ellandium - Nick Brocklehurst

    Ellandium was commissioned for Elland Silver Band's debut album, 'iMAGINATIONS' (2018), and was first performed at their 'Yorkshire Champion Contenders' concert on 25th February 2017. The work is a beautiful hymn with a modern twist, featuring lush, jazz-inspired harmonies and a soaring, heartfelt theme carried delicately by Cornets and Baritone. Composed by Elland Silver Band's Composer-in-Residence, Nick Brocklehurst, Ellandium will satisfy audiences from start to finish, from its humble opening to its powerful climax and peaceful resolution.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £69.95

    TUBA CONCERTO (Gregson) (Tuba Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    This work was commissioned by the Besses o’ th’ Barn Band with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was written for, and is dedicated to, John Fletcher, who gave the first performance in Middleton Civic Hall, near Manchester, on 24 April, 1976, with Besses o’ th’ Barn Band conducted by the composer. Another interesting feature about the premi?re was that it was recorded by BBC Television for an Omnibus programme with Andr? Previn as presenter. The concerto exists in four versions: with brass band (1976), orchestra (1978), wind band (1984) and piano reduction.The concerto is in three movements, following the usual, quick-slow-quick pattern: Allegro deciso,Lento e mesto, Allegro giocoso. The first movement has a sonata form shell with two contrasting themes, the first one being rhythmic in character, the second lyrical. There is a reference made in passing to the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto, but this merges into the other material in the development section.The second movement begins with a chorale, but after the entry of the tuba it leads to a cantabile theme, softly unfolded by the soloist. The opening chorale passage returns, this time briefly on muted brass, and leads to a middle section which is more chromatic in style and soon builds to a powerful climax, where the opening cantabile theme triumphantly returns. The music subsides, returning to the opening chorale and ending peacefully.The finale is light and breezy in style, and is cast in rondo form. After a brief introduction the tuba announces the main rondo theme, which is dance-like and a little jaunty. There are two episodes: the first a broad sweeping tune, the second a slowish waltz and a little jazz-like. After a virtuoso cadenza reference is made to the very opening of the concerto before the work ends with a triumphal flourish.The Tuba Concerto has established itself as one of the main works in the solo tuba repertoire. It has been performed and broadcast in over 40 countries all over the world. There are currently six commercial recordings of the concerto in its various versions.resolution in C major, pointed by a simple but expansive melody towards which the piece has been heading, and ending in a blaze of joyful colour.Duration: 18 mins

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    TUBA CONCERTO (Gregson) (Tuba Solo with Brass Band - Score only) - Gregson, Edward

    Brass Band Score onlyThis work was commissioned by the Besses o’ th’ Barn Band with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was written for, and is dedicated to, John Fletcher, who gave the first performance in Middleton Civic Hall, near Manchester, on 24 April, 1976, with Besses o’ th’ Barn Band conducted by the composer. Another interesting feature about the premi?re was that it was recorded by BBC Television for an Omnibus programme with Andr? Previn as presenter. The concerto exists in three versions: with brass band (1976), orchestra (1978) and wind band (1984).The concerto is in three movements, following the usual, quick-slow-quick pattern: Allegro deciso,Lento e mesto, Allegro giocoso. The first movement has a sonata form shell with two contrasting themes, the first one being rhythmic in character, the second lyrical. There is a reference made in passing to the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto, but this merges into the other material in the development section.The second movement begins with a chorale, but after the entry of the tuba it leads to a cantabile theme, softly unfolded by the soloist. The opening chorale passage returns, this time briefly on muted brass, and leads to a middle section which is more chromatic in style and soon builds to a powerful climax, where the opening cantabile theme triumphantly returns. The music subsides, returning to the opening chorale and ending peacefully.The finale is light and breezy in style, and is cast in rondo form. After a brief introduction the tuba announces the main rondo theme, which is dance-like and a little jaunty. There are two episodes: the first a broad sweeping tune, the second a slowish waltz and a little jazz-like. After a virtuoso cadenza reference is made to the very opening of the concerto before the work ends with a triumphal flourish.The Tuba Concerto has established itself as one of the main works in the solo tuba repertoire. It has been performed and broadcast in over 40 countries all over the world. There are currently six commercial recordings of the concerto in its various versions.resolution in C major, pointed by a simple but expansive melody towards which the piece has been heading, and ending in a blaze of joyful colour.Duration: 18 mins

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £119.00

    Images of the Millennium - Full 2 Band Version - H. Snell

    Richard Evans' request was that the work should mirror aspects of the history of banding while also looking forward. 1. FANFARE. In this movement the work is introduced.2. TOCCATA: CONTEST DAY. The gathering together of players and audience for a contest day is treated in a busy, sometimes jazzy manner.3. PASTORALE: 'A GREEN AND PLEASANT LAND'. Looking back to the third and fourth decades of the nineteenth century and the rapid birth of brass bands and banding, this short Intermezzo invokes the popular picture postcard view of the past. Images of warfare appear briefly as a reminiscence of Britain's continuing military domination of the world, with Trafalgar and Waterloo still echoing on the horizon.4. MUSIC FOR A SILENT FILM: AN OLD MAN REMEMBERS PETERLOO. The reality of 'England's green and pleasant land' was somewhat different. On August 19th 1819 the Stalybridge Band was playing at a political meeting in St Peter's Fields in Manchester, later to become the site of the Free Trade Hall. The local Magistrate, sent in the cavalry. Shots were fired into the crowd, 11 people were killed and 500 injured. I present the scenes as followsthe holiday crowd in St Peter's Field entertained by the Band the unprovoked attack by the militia the flight from St Peter's Fieldthe funeral wake the lament5. SCHERZO: THE CRYSTAL PALACE. Only a few decades later brass bands were regular visitors to the greatest concert halls in the country. I see the Bands and their followers descending on London in trains and charabancs. 6. DREAM-NOCTURNE. As if in a trance, an unending musical line is passed around the ensemble to celebrate the players who possessed, and still possess, the sound and phrasing to enthrall the listener.7. ODYSSEY. The way forward now beckons. The music passes through conflict, struggle and turmoil on its way to release, resolution and finally to triumph.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Mansions of Glory - Score & Parts - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    The Mansions of Glory - Score Only - Jonathan Bates

    “A young, talented and tender-hearted actress was passing along the street of a large city. Seeing a pale, sick girl lying upon a couch just within the half-open door of a beautiful dwelling, she entered, with the thought that by her vivacity and pleasant conversation she might cheer the young invalid. The sick girl was a devoted Christian, and her words, her patience, her submission and heaven-lit countenance so demonstrated the spirit of her religion that the actress was led to give some earnest thought to the claims of Christianity, and was thoroughly converted and became a true follower of Christ. She told her father, the leader of a theatre troupe, of her conversion and of her desire to abandon the stage, stating that she could not live a consistent Christian life and follow the life of an actress. Her father was astonished beyond measure and told his daughter that their living would be lost to them and their business ruined if she persisted in her resolution.Loving her father dearly, she was shaken somewhat in her purpose and partially consented to fill the published engagement to be met in a few days. She was the star of the troupe, and a general favourite. Every preparation was made for the play in which she was to appear. The evening came and the father rejoiced that he had won back his daughter and that their living was not to be lost. The hour arrived; a large audience had assembled. The curtain rose and the young actress stepped forward firmly, amid the applause of the multitude. But an unwonted light beamed from her beautiful face. Amid the breathless silence of the audience, she repeated: ‘My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.’ This was all. Through Christ she had conquered and, leaving the audience in tears, she retired from the stage, never to appear upon it again. Through her influence her father was converted, and through their united evangelistic labours many were led to God.” 1. My Jesus, I love thee, I know thou art mine,For thee all the pleasures of sin I resign;My gracious Redeemer, my Saviour art thou,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.2. I love thee because thou hast first lov?d me,And purchased my pardon on Calvary’s tree;I love thee for wearing the thorns on thy brow,If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.3. I will love thee in life, I will love thee in death, And praise thee as long as thou lendest me breath; And say, when the death-dew lies cold on my brow; If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now.4. In mansions of Glory and endless delight,I’ll ever adore thee and dwell in thy sight; I’ll sing with the glittering crown on my brow: If ever I loved thee, my Jesus, ‘tis now. William Ralph Featherstone

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    Tuba Concerto - Score and Parts - Edward Gregson

    This work was commissioned by the Besses o’ th’ Barn Band with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was written for, and is dedicated to, John Fletcher, who gave the first performance in Middleton Civic Hall, near Manchester, on 24 April, 1976, with Besses o’ th’ Barn Band conducted by the composer. Another interesting feature about the premi?re was that it was recorded by BBC Television for an Omnibus programme with Andr? Previn as presenter. The concerto exists in three versions: with brass band (1976), orchestra (1978) and wind band (1984).The concerto is in three movements, following the usual, quick-slow-quick pattern: Allegro deciso,Lento e mesto, Allegro giocoso. The first movement has a sonata form shell with two contrasting themes, the first one being rhythmic in character, the second lyrical. There is a reference made in passing to the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto, but this merges into the other material in the development section.The second movement begins with a chorale, but after the entry of the tuba it leads to a cantabile theme, softly unfolded by the soloist. The opening chorale passage returns, this time briefly on muted brass, and leads to a middle section which is more chromatic in style and soon builds to a powerful climax, where the opening cantabile theme triumphantly returns. The music subsides, returning to the opening chorale and ending peacefully.The finale is light and breezy in style, and is cast in rondo form. After a brief introduction the tuba announces the main rondo theme, which is dance-like and a little jaunty. There are two episodes: the first a broad sweeping tune, the second a slowish waltz and a little jazz-like. After a virtuoso cadenza reference is made to the very opening of the concerto before the work ends with a triumphal flourish.The Tuba Concerto has established itself as one of the main works in the solo tuba repertoire. It has been performed and broadcast in over 40 countries all over the world. There are currently six commercial recordings of the concerto in its various versions.resolution in C major, pointed by a simple but expansive melody towards which the piece has been heading, and ending in a blaze of joyful colour.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days