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  • £24.95

    Of Whom I Sing Jeg Elsker Dig (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Grieg, Edvard - Ballantine, Leonard

    The original, Jeg elsker Dig, is a plaintive love song for voice and piano with words by Hans Christian Anderson; 'You have become thought of my thought, you are my heart's first love. I love you, as no one here on earth, I shall love you through time and eternity!'

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £12.50

    Of Whom I Sing Jeg Elsker Dig (Brass Band - Score only) - Grieg, Edvard - Ballantine, Leonard

    The original, Jeg elsker Dig, is a plaintive love song for voice and piano with words by Hans Christian Anderson; 'You have become thought of my thought, you are my heart's first love. I love you, as no one here on earth, I shall love you through time and eternity!'

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £42.95

    Shout! (Trombone Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wiffin, Rob

    Shout! was written for Brett Baker to demonstrate a particular musical aspect of his trombone playing.It is a Latin jazz piece subtitled CCC 4 BB - Cha cha cha for Brett Baker - and shows the trombone's ability to act as a declamatory jazz voice, covering much of the range and expressive power of the instrument. In one sense the title also refers to the jazz tradition of a Shout chorus which often appears towards the end of a jazz piece, bringing the players together after they have all taken their improvised solos.Shout! should hopefully be enjoyable to listen to and, although not without its technical challenges, fun to play.Duration: 3.45Recorded on Polyphonic QPRL227D SHOUT!

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £99.99

    The Divine Right (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Harper, Philip

    At the time of composing this piece, the Arab Spring was sweeping through the Middle East. It seemed that almost every week a new country's people had risen up against the regimes and dictatorships which had prevailed for generations, leaving many nations at a defining crossroads in their history. There were so many possible ways ahead: so many hopes, yet so many uncertainties.This music is a depiction of these revolutionary times, and several musical themes are in turn presented, discussed, considered, fought over, altered, rejected or accepted.Most nations have had, or probably will have, their own Arab Spring, including the United Kingdom. Events of 17th Century Britain provide the context for this piece, particularly those following the execution of the tyrant King Charles I on 30 January 1649. The regicide was in part due to Charless steadfast belief in the Divine Right of Kings, and led to a tumultuous interregnum, where England stood at its own defining crossroads. The music begins turbulently, before King Charles appears and is led to the gallows outside Banqueting House in central London where he is brutally decapitated. From the assembled crowd rose, according to one observer,a moan as I never heard before and desire I may never hear again.The music descends to emptiness.The musical argument which follows is not strictly programmatic, but a number of musical themes are all thrown into the melting pot, representing ideas such as: religion; military force; reasoned Parliamentary debate; and the chattering, irrepressible voice of the people. Additionally, there are some quotations from the music of royalist composer Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656), who was often in tune with the feeling of the times.This defining episode in England's history was brought to a close with the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and as the exiled King Charles II rode back into London the diarist John Evelyn wrote:Never was so joyful a day seen in this nation. I stood in the Strand and beheld it, and blessed God.At the end of the piece the bells ring out, and the musical appearance of the King has transformed from turbulent to triumphant.Duration: 17.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £39.95

    The Divine Right (Brass Band - Score only) - Harper, Philip

    At the time of composing this piece, the Arab Spring was sweeping through the Middle East. It seemed that almost every week a new country's people had risen up against the regimes and dictatorships which had prevailed for generations, leaving many nations at a defining crossroads in their history. There were so many possible ways ahead: so many hopes, yet so many uncertainties.This music is a depiction of these revolutionary times, and several musical themes are in turn presented, discussed, considered, fought over, altered, rejected or accepted.Most nations have had, or probably will have, their own Arab Spring, including the United Kingdom. Events of 17th Century Britain provide the context for this piece, particularly those following the execution of the tyrant King Charles I on 30 January 1649. The regicide was in part due to Charless steadfast belief in the Divine Right of Kings, and led to a tumultuous interregnum, where England stood at its own defining crossroads. The music begins turbulently, before King Charles appears and is led to the gallows outside Banqueting House in central London where he is brutally decapitated. From the assembled crowd rose, according to one observer,a moan as I never heard before and desire I may never hear again.The music descends to emptiness.The musical argument which follows is not strictly programmatic, but a number of musical themes are all thrown into the melting pot, representing ideas such as: religion; military force; reasoned Parliamentary debate; and the chattering, irrepressible voice of the people. Additionally, there are some quotations from the music of royalist composer Thomas Tomkins (1572-1656), who was often in tune with the feeling of the times.This defining episode in England's history was brought to a close with the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, and as the exiled King Charles II rode back into London the diarist John Evelyn wrote:Never was so joyful a day seen in this nation. I stood in the Strand and beheld it, and blessed God.At the end of the piece the bells ring out, and the musical appearance of the King has transformed from turbulent to triumphant.Duration: 17.00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £74.99

    Valerius Variations (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sparke, Philip

    Dutch composer, artist and poet Adriaen Valerius is mostly remembered today for his collection of 79 songs for voice and lute or cittern, published posthumously in 1626. Philip Sparke has taken one melody from this collection that tells of the War of Independence with Spain. The beautiful slow melody is followed by a series of lively variations to form an extremely entertaining piece that will bring great joy to all who perform and listen to it.Duration: 9:00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £20.00

    Voi Che Sapete (from The Marriage of Figaro) (Euphonium Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus - Littlemore, Phillip

    Mozart's opera, The Marriage of Figaro, was based on what was a rather scandalous play by Pierre Beaumarchais, because the drama involves an incompetent nobleman being upstaged by a crafty, quick-witted servant named Figaro, in their quest for the same woman. The action takes place in just one day and offers a series of awkward and humorous situations, complete with a vibrant dialogue between the all the main characters. Voi Che Sapeteis performed by Cherubino, who is about to be sent off to the army because the Count finds him a nuisance. When Cherubino appears before the Countess and Susanna to tell them of his fate, this aria is sung at the request of Susanna for a love song. Cherubino is characterized as a young adolescent who is in love with every woman he meets, and because his voice is yet unbroken, he is always played by a female singer.Duration: 2:30

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £20.00

    Voi Che Sapete (from The Marriage of Figaro) (Vocal Solo (Soprano) with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Mozart, Wolfgang Amadeus - Littlemore, Phillip

    Mozart's opera, The Marriage of Figaro, was based on what was a rather scandalous play by Pierre Beaumarchais, because the drama involves an incompetent nobleman being upstaged by a crafty, quick-witted servant named Figaro, in their quest for the same woman. The action takes place in just one day and offers a series of awkward and humorous situations, complete with a vibrant dialogue between the all the main characters. Voi Che Sapeteis performed by Cherubino, who is about to be sent off to the army because the Count finds him a nuisance. When Cherubino appears before the Countess and Susanna to tell them of his fate, this aria is sung at the request of Susanna for a love song. Cherubino is characterized as a young adolescent who is in love with every woman he meets, and because his voice is yet unbroken, he is always played by a female singer.Duration: 2:30

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £35.56

    Miserere mei, Deus (Brass Band) Gregorio Allegri arr. Espen Haukus

    Miserere mei, Deus was composed by the Italian composer Gregorio Allegri (1582-1652) during the 1630s for use in the Sistine Chapel during matins, as part of the exclusive Tenebrae service on Wednesday and Friday of the Holy Week. The Miserere is written for two choirs, one of five and one of four voices, and is generally accepted to be one of the finest examples of Renaissance polyphony to survive to the present day. Tutti choirs sing a simple version of the original Miserere chant; one voice then, spatially separated, sings an ornamented "commentary" on this. The comment-part is left out in this arrangement due to its meaning with text, though monotonous in tune. The introduction is added by the arranger to set the right atmosphere before the original chant is played. The brass choirs are meant to be placed opposite each other in a church or large hall. To view a video of Norges Nasjonale Brassband performing the piece please visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=YrJU3lwYD9U PDF download includes score and parts. Sheet music available from: UK - www.brassband.co.uk USA - www.solidbrassmusic.com Difficulty Level: 4th Section + Instrumentation: Brass Choir 1: Solo Cornets (incl. Repiano) Horn in Eb Tenor Trombones in Bb Euphoniums Basses in Bb Timpani Brass Choir 2: Soprano Cornet in Eb 2nd Cornets in Bb 3rd Cornets in Bb Flugelhorn Horns in Eb Baritones Bass Trombone Basses in Eb

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days
  • £10.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need - hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.Performance NotesWhere space and practicality permits the opening movement should be played with cornets and trombones standing behind the band facing the audience; they should retake their seats for the second and third movements.PercussionConcert Bass Drum (ideally NOT Kit/Pedal Bass Drum), Suspended Cymbal, pair of Clash Cymbals, Glockenspiel, Snare Drum, Tambourine, 2 x Timpani (Eb-G, Bb-D), 2 x Tom-toms, Triangle, Tam-Tam* (only if available), Tubular Bells *(only if available).MutesBaritones, all cornets and trombones will require metal straight mutes; all trombones and cornets will require cup mutes.*The Once and Future King was set as the test-piece for the 3rd section of the Swiss National Championships in 2007. The score was then slightly revised in July 2008, the main alteration being the exclusion of the tubular bells part for the Regional Championships of Great Britain in 2009. Some parts which were optional (or cued on other instruments) at the request of the Swiss Brass Band Association were restored to their original octaves and instruments. In 2015 the tubular bells part was restored in the optional Percussion 3 part; all parts in Percussion 3 are optional, although some are cued in the percussion 1 & 2 parts (and the cues should be played if only two players are available).Listen to a preview and follow along with the score below!

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days