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  • £17.50

    Open All Hours - Wellington Guernsey & Joseph Ascher - John Lee

    The theme tune from one of Britain’s iconic comedy shows is in fact, an old tune entitled ‘Alice, Where Art Thou’ composed by Joseph Ascher, a Dutch composer and pianist. The opening title sequence of the show heard brass arranger, Max Harris performing his own version of the tune, who also composed the incidental music for the show. This light-hearted release coincides with the release of the new Open All Hours series starring David Jason who now runs the corner shop years later. A great easy going summer concert item and one that audience members will truly enjoy.(also playable by training bands)

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £100.00
  • £14.50
  • £25.00

    Water of Life - Brass Band - John van Gulik

    This arrangement is a blend of the traditional tunes used for "The Well is Deep" ("The voice in the old village choir" - Harry Woods, 1932) and "Jesus Keep me Near the Cross" (author unknown).

    Estimated delivery 2-4 days
  • £22.00

    My Old Friend John (Brass Band - Score and Parts)

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    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £159.95

    Tunes and Toasts for all Times

    This classic collection of 100 airs, fanfares and works for all occasions is skilfully arranged by Roger Barsotti and makes a perfect edition to your library.Includes: A Fine Old English Gentleman; A-Hunting We Will Go; British Grenadiers; Cherry Ripe; Clementine; Come, Lassies and Lads; Drink to Me Only; Dulce Domum; The Drunken Sailor; For He's a Jolly Good Fellow; The Farmer's Boy; Floral Dance; Frothblowers' Anthem; Here's a Health Unto Her Majesty; John Peel; The Keel Row; Love's Old Sweet Song; March of the Fire Brigades; Princess Royal's Red Cross March; Sir Roger de Coverley; See the Conquering Hero Comes; Soldiers of the Queen; There is a Tavern in the Town; Heart of Oak; Hornpipe; Shenandoah; Rule, Britannia; Annie Laurie; Auld Lang Syne; Bonnie Dundee; Blue-bells of Scotland; Scotch Reel; Scots Wha Hae; Will Ye No Come Back Again?; Ye Banks and Braes; Come Back to Erin; Danny Boy (Londonderry Air); Men of Harlech; Carry Me Back to Old Virginny; Dixie; Good-Night (Shine, Shine, Moon); John Brown's Body; When Johnny Comes Marching Home; Yankee Doodle; Alouette; Abide With Me; Eternal Father, Strong to Save; O God, Our Help in Ages Past; The First Nowell; Good King Wenceslas; O Come All Ye Faithful; While Shepherds Watched; Jerusalem; The Supreme Sacrifice; Dead march from Saul; General Salute; Slow March or Troop 'Scipio'; Troop 'May-Blossom'; Declamatory No.1; Occasional Fanfare No.2; Reveille; Retreat; Last Post; Galop from Orpheus in the Underworld; God Save the Queen (in B); God Save the Queen (in F) and many more.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days