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  • £29.95

    Be My Love - Nicholas Brodszky & Sammy Cahn - Ray Farr

    Be My Love was immortalized by the famous operatic tenor Mario Lanza. This version for euphonium and brass band was expertly crafted by Ray Farr in the late 80's for the Grimethorpe Colliery Band and one of the best euphonium players of all time, Nicholas Childs. This arrangement is available with piano, brass band or wind band accompaniments.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £24.95

    Be My Love - Nicholas Brodszky

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    JOY THROUGH THE AGES (Brass Band Set) - Howard Evans

    This work was written for the 125th anniversary of Boscombe Band, celebrated in November 2011, and is the title track of the band' album released in the same year. The music is celebratory in nature and is dedicated to all those who have served in the band during its 125 year history. The theme of the work is a song by Charles Hutchison Gabriel which was the favourite of the band's librarian, Gerald Whittingham, who was 'promoted to Glory' after a long battle with a brain tumour. The title comes from the last verse, 'When with the ransomed in Glory, his face I at last shall see, 'twill be my joy through the ages, to sing of his love for me'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    Joy Through The Ages (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Evans, Howard J.

    This work was written for the 125th anniversary of Boscombe Band, celebrated in November 2011, and is the title track of the band' album released in the same year. The music is celebratory in nature and is dedicated to all those who have served in the band during its 125 year history. The theme of the work is a song by Charles Hutchison Gabriel which was the favourite of the band's librarian, Gerald Whittingham, who was 'promoted to Glory' after a long battle with a brain tumour. The title comes from the last verse, 'When with the ransomed in Glory, his face I at last shall see, 'twill be my joy through the ages, to sing of his love for me'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £22.50

    Joy Through The Ages (Brass Band - Score only) - Evans, Howard J.

    This work was written for the 125th anniversary of Boscombe Band, celebrated in November 2011, and is the title track of the band' album released in the same year. The music is celebratory in nature and is dedicated to all those who have served in the band during its 125 year history. The theme of the work is a song by Charles Hutchison Gabriel which was the favourite of the band's librarian, Gerald Whittingham, who was 'promoted to Glory' after a long battle with a brain tumour. The title comes from the last verse, 'When with the ransomed in Glory, his face I at last shall see, 'twill be my joy through the ages, to sing of his love for me'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Three Burns Portraits - Rodney Newton

    Robert Burns (1759-1796) was one of the most colourful literary figures of the 18th Century. The son of a tenant farmer, he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, and earned a living variously as a farmer, flax dresser and exercise man, gradually establishing himself as a poet, lyricist and collector of folksongs. A charismatic character, by the time of his death he had become Scotland's best known and best-loved poet. This work depicts three characters from his personal life who also figure in his poetry. Although Burns intended much of his verse to be sung, and even wrote tunes himself for many of his lyrics, all the melodies in this work are original.I John AndersonJohn Anderson (1759-1832) was an Ayrshire carpenter and close friend to Robert Burns, who immortalised Anderson in his affectionate poem John Anderson Ma Jo, which imagines both men in old age (although Burns was only 37 when he died). Anderson is reputed to have made Robert Burns' coffin and survived the wrecking of the paddle steamer Cornet at Craignish Point near Oban during a storm in 1820, an event incorporated into this movement. This is a picture of a tough, resilient Scot who meets the storms of Life head-on.II Mary CampbellRobert Burns had numerous love affairs, sometimes with more than one woman at a time. Mary Campbell, a sailor's daughter from the highland district of Dunoon, had entered service with a family in Ayrshire when she met Burns. Although involved with another woman at the time, Burns was smitten with Campbell and there is evidence to suggest that he planned to emigrate to Jamaica with Mary. However, nothing came of this wild scheme and Mary, fearing disgrace and scandal left the area but not before Burns had enshrined her in at least two poems, Highland Mary and To Mary Campbell. Significantly, the first line of the latter runs, "Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, and leave auld Scotia's Shore?" (His ardent pleading can be heard in the middle section of the movement). Mary's music paints a portrait of a graceful young lady who had the presence of mind not to be entirely won over by the charms of Robert Burns.III Douglas GrahamBurns was a heavy drinker, and this is most likely a contribution to his early death. He was matched in this capacity by his friend, Douglas ‘Tam' Graham, a farmer who sought solace in the bottle from an unhappy marriage. Burns used his drinking partner as a model for the comic poem, Tam O'Shanter, which tells of a drunken Ayrshire farmer who encounters a Witches' Sabbath and escapes with his life, but at the cost of his horse tail. The story was said to be made up by Graham himself to placate his fearsome, but very superstitious, wife after he arrived home one night, worse the wear for drink and with his old mare's tail cropped by some village prankster. This present piece depicts Tam enjoying a riotous night at a local hostilely in the company of his friends, John Anderson and ‘Rabbie' Burns.Rodney Newton - 2013

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £53.00

    Auld Lang Syne - Menno Haantjes

    Whereas 'Auld Lang Syne' may be considered the best-known Scottish song ever, yet at the same time it is an obscure one, for there are but few people who know the complete text by heart. After the familiar 'Should auld acquaintance be forgot .....' many people take their refuge to lyrics like 'rum tee dum ta dee ..... lah, lah, lah ........... for auld lang syne'. Even in Scotland only a handful of persons know the entire text and are able to give a correct rendering of it. The current lyrics have been attributed to the Scottish poet Robert Burns. Burns, however, he did not write the whole poem : after he had heard an old man sing the centuries-old Scotch ballad, he wrote it down and added a number of stanzas (1788). Historical research teaches us that the ballad served many purposes, both political and religious. Nowadays, 'Auld Lang Syne' is sung as a Christmas Carol and it is also sung on New Year's Eve at the turning of the year. Apart from that, though, the song is also sung on many other occasions - sometimes with different lyrics, which usually have Love, Friendship and/or Parting as their themes, as these go well with the fascinating melody. In this arrangement a low-sounding solo instrument is central. The harmonization in the accompaniment fits in perfectly with the sentiments this song will evoke. Should auld acquaintance be forgot And never brought to mind? Should auld acquintance be forgot. And days of auld lang syne? For auld lang syne, my dear, For auld lang syne, We'll take a cup of kindness yet, For auld lang syne.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £37.50

    Postcard from Mexico - H. Snell

    I wrote Postcard from Mexico for a BBC TV contest, because I urgently needed a finisher to provide an exciting and powerful end to the programme. PFM did the trick and to my surprise immediately became popular with bands and audiences. I evoked the atmosphere of Mexican music with nods towards Aaron Copland, Chavez and Ginastera. However the responsability for most of it, particularly the rhythmic difficulties and the unusual drunken middle section, must be laid at my door. We grade it 2 and 3 because, while difficult, so many bands love to tangle with its problems.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £29.95

    Christians Awake - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Christmas time is my favourite time of year. I love the festive spirit and all the Christmas music both traditional and modern.I came across the carol "Christians Awake" a number of years ago when I played in a carol concert with the Black Dyke Band and the Halifax Choral Society. I think it is a fabulous carol and it is now one of my favourite Christmas carols.Two good friends of mine; Angela and Christopher Clough were married during the Christmas period in 2007. They both play with the band Wardle Anderson Brass who played at their wedding. They asked me if I could compose a piece for the band to play while Angela walked down the aisle. So for their wedding present I composed a fanfare using the carol Christians Awake.They were thrilled with the piece as was I. It works really well as a concert opener or an opener to the second half of a Christmas concert. It should be played with lots of bravura and pomp and full of the spirit of Christmas.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £20.00

    Scarborough Fair

    Scarborough Fair is a traditional English ballad about the Yorkshire town of Scarborough. The song relates the tale of a young man who instructs the listener to tell his former love to perform for him a series of impossible tasks, such as making him a shirt without a seam and then washing it in a dry well, adding that if she completes these tasks he will take her back. Often the song is sung as a duet, with the woman then giving her lover a series of equally impossible tasks, promising to give him his seamless shirt once he has finished.As the versions of the ballad known under the title Scarborough Fair are usually limited to the exchange of these impossible tasks, many suggestions concerning the plot have been proposed, including the theory that it is about the Great Plague of the late Middle Ages. The lyrics of "Scarborough Fair" appear to have something in common with an obscure Scottish ballad, The Elfin Knight which has been traced at least as far back as 1670 and may well be earlier. In this ballad, an elf threatens to abduct a young woman to be his lover unless she can perform an impossible task.As the song spread, it was adapted, modified, and rewritten to the point that dozens of versions existed by the end of the 18th century, although only a few are typically sung nowadays. The references to the traditional English fair, "Scarborough Fair" and the refrain "parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme" date to 19th century versions. A number of older versions refer to locations other than Scarborough Fair, including Wittingham Fair, Cape Ann, "twixt Berwik and Lyne", etc.The earliest notable recording of it was by Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger, a version which heavily influenced Simon and Garfunkel's later more famous version. Amongst many other recordings, the tune was used by the Stone Roses as the basis of their song "Elizabeth my Dear". To view a sample PDF score click here.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days

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