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  • £10.99

    New York (Brass Band/Score) - Nigel Hess

    For anyone who is familiar with this bizarre and wonderful city,this pieceneeds no explanation. 'New York' is the third movement of , originally written for wind band, commissioned in 1985 by the British Youth Wind Orchestra with funds from National Westminster Bank plc. These three short 'pictures' were inspired by several visits by the composer to a small part of the USA's East Coast, an area that provides great extremes in the geography and the people.Brass Band Grades 4/5: Premier Youth and 2nd Section

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £49.99

    New York (Brass Band/Score & Parts) - Nigel Hess

    For anyone who is familiar with this bizarre and wonderful city, this piece needs no explanation. is the third movement of , originally written for wind band, commissioned in 1985 by the British Youth Wind Orchestra with funds from National Westminster Bank plc. These three short 'pictures' were inspired by several visits by the composer to a small part of the USA's East Coast, an area that provides great extremes in the geography and the people.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £94.00

    Fire - Pimpanit Karoonyavanich

    Fire - Pimpanit Karoonyavanich - 08'30'' - BVT113 Fire is one of the four great elements; earth, water, wind and fire, which create the universe in buddhistic aspect. Fire creates living beings, fire gives world warmth and fire can be the symbol of romance. However, fire can also destroy the world when human uses it out of their angriness, hatred and jealousy. This piece begins with the creation of the world and living beings. The slow movement in the middle of the piece defines fire as the symbol of warmth and romance. After the warm moment of fire has gone, the theme of war begins. It is caused by the misuse of fire from human which brings the world and humanity to the end. The strong ending of this piece represents the end of world and humanity.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £87.00

    Kefas - Rob Goorhuis

    The composition Kefas was written for the brass band 'Apollo' from Grou (The Netherlands), by order of the Unisono Foundation, the organisation for wind music in The Netherlands.The assignment was given on account of earning the Champions Title during the Dutch Brass Band Championships in the year 2001 (4th division). The theme of the composition links the tradition of the village Grou, not to celebrate Sint Nicolaas but Sint Pieter.By this typical Dutch festivity (in December) the holy Nicolaas gives presents to the children. It is a popular custom where young and old participate. Grou is the only place where this is not done by Sint Nicolaas but by Sint Pieter. Apart from that, on the 22th of Februari, a lot of festivities that take place,resemble those of the Sinterklaas celebration. In the composition two Sint Pieter songs are processed, set through bible scenes, wherein in among others the visit of Christ to the house of Peter's Mother-in-law and the calling of Peter are depicted. The title refers to the pronouncement of Christ, where he named Peter the rock on which he shall build his church. The Hebrew word for rock is Kephas. Kefas was premiered in 2003.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £89.95

    INFINITY (Brass Band Set) - Robert Redhead

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £10.00

    INFINITY (Brass Band Study Score) - Robert Redhead

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £89.95

    Infinity (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Redhead, Robert

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    Infinity (Brass Band - Score only) - Redhead, Robert

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £10.00

    Infinity (Brass Band - Study Score) - Redhead, Robert

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £69.95

    TUBA CONCERTO (Gregson) (Tuba Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Gregson, Edward

    This work was commissioned by the Besses o’ th’ Barn Band with funds provided by the Arts Council of Great Britain. It was written for, and is dedicated to, John Fletcher, who gave the first performance in Middleton Civic Hall, near Manchester, on 24 April, 1976, with Besses o’ th’ Barn Band conducted by the composer. Another interesting feature about the premi?re was that it was recorded by BBC Television for an Omnibus programme with Andr? Previn as presenter. The concerto exists in four versions: with brass band (1976), orchestra (1978), wind band (1984) and piano reduction.The concerto is in three movements, following the usual, quick-slow-quick pattern: Allegro deciso,Lento e mesto, Allegro giocoso. The first movement has a sonata form shell with two contrasting themes, the first one being rhythmic in character, the second lyrical. There is a reference made in passing to the Vaughan Williams Tuba Concerto, but this merges into the other material in the development section.The second movement begins with a chorale, but after the entry of the tuba it leads to a cantabile theme, softly unfolded by the soloist. The opening chorale passage returns, this time briefly on muted brass, and leads to a middle section which is more chromatic in style and soon builds to a powerful climax, where the opening cantabile theme triumphantly returns. The music subsides, returning to the opening chorale and ending peacefully.The finale is light and breezy in style, and is cast in rondo form. After a brief introduction the tuba announces the main rondo theme, which is dance-like and a little jaunty. There are two episodes: the first a broad sweeping tune, the second a slowish waltz and a little jazz-like. After a virtuoso cadenza reference is made to the very opening of the concerto before the work ends with a triumphal flourish.The Tuba Concerto has established itself as one of the main works in the solo tuba repertoire. It has been performed and broadcast in over 40 countries all over the world. There are currently six commercial recordings of the concerto in its various versions.resolution in C major, pointed by a simple but expansive melody towards which the piece has been heading, and ending in a blaze of joyful colour.Duration: 18 mins

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days