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  • £59.95

    Music from Kantara - Kenneth Downie

    Despite the exotic sounding title, the origins of Kenneth Downies fine composition are somewhat more prosaic. When the composer and his wife moved into a new home they were intrigued to find it called Kantara. Not wanting to upset the outgoing owners, and wishing to find out more, they decided to keep the name.Some judicious research found that Kantara was a ruined castle in Northern Cyprus which the previous owners had once visited. A picture of it was left hanging on the wall of the house for the new owners to enjoy.Written in 1993 for the National School Band Association Composer Competition, it has subsequently been used at youth and senior level - from the National Youth Band Championships of Great Britain to the Pontins Championship.The three-movement work is in no way descriptive, but each has individual character - from a light hearted spiritoso followed by a short lyrical middle section to an animated presto finale.

    Estimated delivery 5-10 working days
  • £19.50

    The Farewell Symphony - Joseph Haydn - Neville Buxton

    Composed in 1772, Haydn's Symphony No.45, better known as the "Farewell Symphony" due to the circumstances of which it was composed. Haydn's employer, Prince Nikolaus became so attracted to his Eszterhaza Castle, he spent longer and longer there each year. The court musicians were not allowed their families with them and became increasingly depressed. This symphony was composed in such a way, that during the last movement, one by one, each player blew out their candle, and crept of stage. The idea being that the prince would get the subtle hint. The next day, the court returned to Vienna! Arranged in the same way, players able to walk off one by one, a perfect ending to a concert, or first half.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days
  • £21.50

    Don't You Want Me (Baby) - The Human League - Gavin Somerset

    Originally released in 1981, this single by The Human League took the took the Christmas No.1 spot and has since gone on to sell over 1.5 million copies, making it the 23rd most successful single in British history. The music has easily stood the test of time, with many still seeing the track as a firm favourite for parties. Now for the first time, the work is available for band. This is a great way to show off a brass band’s versatility and reach out to audiences of all ages. Something different and a must have.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-3 days

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  • £69.95

    Lost Village of Imber, The - Christopher Bond

    The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain had been inhabited for over one thousand years when it was evacuated in 1943 to make way for military training in the Second World War. At the time, with preparations for the Allied invasion of Europe underway, most villagers put up no resistance, despite being upset, with the belief that they'd return once the war had concluded. To this day, Imber and its surrounding land remain a military training ground. The villagers never returned, and just the shell of what was once a community remains. Structured in three movements, it is on this very real story that the work is based, setting out the series of events of 1943 in chronological order. The first movement, On Imber Downe, portrays a sense of jollity and cohesiveness - a community of individuals living and working together before news of the evacuation had broken. Sounds of the village are heard throughout, not least in a series of percussive effects - the anvil of the blacksmith; the cowbell of the cattle and the bells of the church. The second movement, The Church of St. Giles, begins mysteriously and this sonorous, atmospheric opening depicts Imber in its desolate state and the apprehension of residents as they learn they have to leave their homes. Amidst this is the Church, a symbol of hope for villagers who one day wish to return, portrayed with a sweeping melodic passage before the music returns to the apprehension of villagers facing eviction around their sadness at losing their rural way of life. In complete contrast, the third movement, Imemerie Aeternum, portrays the arrival of the military, complete with the sounds of the ammunition, firing and tanks - sounds which were all too familiar to those living in the surround areas. To close, the Church of St. Giles theme returns in a triumphant style, representing the idea that the church has always been, even to this day, a beacon of hope for the villagers and local community - both the centrepiece and pinnacle of a very real story. The work was commissioned by Bratton Silver Band in celebration of the band's 160th Anniversary, with funding from the Arts Council National Lottery Project Grants Fund and the Brass Bands England Norman Jones Trust Fund.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £74.95

    Eden (Score and Parts) - Pickard, John

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £29.50

    Eden (Score Only) - Pickard, John

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 7-14 days
  • £12.00

    Dragon Dances

    DescriptionDragon Dances was commissioned by Owen Farr, who is also the work's dedicatee, gave the first performance with the Cornwall Youth Band conducted by Richard Evans on 5 April 2010 and has recorded it on his solo CD "A New Dawn" accompanied by the Cory Band conducted by Philip Harper.Being a Welsh composer, writing music for a Welsh soloist, I was naturally keen to reflect this in the music, and I drew inspiration from two particularly Welsh concepts - "hiraeth" and "hwyl". "Hiraeth" is a word that has no direct translation into English, but an approximation would be 'yearning for home'. Like the other celtic nations, Wales has a widespread diaspora of people who left to seek new lives out in the empire and "hiraeth" is a way of summing up the homesickness felt by these exiles, some of whom return each year for a special ceremony at the Royal National Eisteddfod. "Hwyl" is an even more complicated word, variously meaning ecstatic joy, fervour, equable temperament and even the characteristic sing-song oration style of the great Welsh Methodist preachers.I have attempted to make the music reflect both of these, with the melancholy first part of the work inspired by the hymns and solo songs for which Wales is famous, and the second part having a much more dance-like, joyful quality.Watch/Listen to the score below:

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £90.00

    The Legend of King Arthur - Peter Meechan

    King Arthur is the subject of many tales, stories, myths and legends - from his ascension to the throne by pulling the sword from the stone, his courageous battles with his fellow Knights of the Round Table, to his ultimately tragic love for Guinevere.The Legend of King Arthur is a musical portrayal of some of the most important moments in the legend.The opening of the work - a rock inspired overture - is a reference to Arthura??s final resting place (at least, so some legends have it!), the modern day Glastonbury (Avalon in the legend), and it is in this opening that we hear for Arthura??s theme.This high octane opening gives way to a mysterious section - as Merlin (the mystical wizard) places in a stone a sword, upon which was inscribed a??Whoso pulleth out this sword of this stone is the rightwise born king of all Englanda?. The music describes the mystical surroundings as each of the contenders for the throne take their turn - to no avail - and with a return to the original theme, we hear Arthur pull the sword from the stone, to become King of England.Next we hear a depiction of Arthura??s greatest victory in battle ??" The Battle of Mount Badon. He finally defeated the Saxon invaders of Britain - over 900 Saxons perished - and the victory brought about an extended period of peace. Arthur is portrayed as brave, bold and confident as he and his Knights end years of invasion.The penultimate section of the work tells the tale of Arthura??s tragic love for Guinevere - his traitorous wife, who through her infidelity with Sir Lancelot (Arthura??s most trusted Knight), ultimately leads Arthur in to his final battle with his nephew, Mordred.We hear the final bitter battle, which eventually ends with only Arthur and Mordred fighting. Arthur is wounded, fatally, by his nephew -at which point we hear with a sudden and dramatic sounding of Arthura??s theme - and is taken to Avalon to die.The Legend of King Arthur is dedicated to Michael Bach and Brass Band BA?Argermusik Luzern, who commissioned the work.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £59.95

    Between the Moon and Mexico (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Sparke, Philip

    Between the Moon and Mexico was composed for the 1998 Finals of the National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. The first performance took place at the Royal Albert Hall, London, on the 17th of October.The title has no hidden meaning and was chosen preciesly because it would not predetermine the style or form of the work. The composer wanted to see what sort of piece would emerge if the only influence was what had already been written. The result is a sort of musical collage in which various musical collage in which various musical elements, ranging from two or three notes to complete melodies, assume importance by virtue of their context. In a way, the piece grew out of itself.Duration: 16.30

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days
  • £29.95

    Between the Moon and Mexico (Brass Band - Score only) - Sparke, Philip

    Between the Moon and Mexico was composed for the 1998 Finals of the National Brass Band Championships of Great Britain. The first performance took place at the Royal Albert Hall, London, on the 17th of October.The title has no hidden meaning and was chosen preciesly because it would not predetermine the style or form of the work. The composer wanted to see what sort of piece would emerge if the only influence was what had already been written. The result is a sort of musical collage in which various musical collage in which various musical elements, ranging from two or three notes to complete melodies, assume importance by virtue of their context. In a way, the piece grew out of itself.Duration: 16.30

    Estimated delivery 5-10 days