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  • £57.50

    No Time To Die - Christopher Bond

    Delayed by the pandemic but scheduled for release in 2021, the much-anticipated James Bond film No Time to Die features a darkly beautiful and moody theme song recorded by Billie Eilish. With hints of the signature Bond harmonic flavour and stylish setting, this song is already on its way to becoming a classic. Note: whilst the demo video demonstrates the concert band arrangement, the version available to purchase on this website is the brass band transcription by Christopher Bond.

    Estimated dispatch 5-10 working days
  • £59.99

    No Time to Die

    Delayed by the pandemic but scheduled for release in 2021, the much-anticipated James Bond film No Time to Die features a darkly beautiful and moody theme song recorded by Billie Eilish. With hints of the signature Bond harmonic flavor and stylish setting, this song is already on its way to becoming a classic, perfectly transcribed for brass band by Christopher Bond.

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

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  • £59.99

    No Time to Die (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - O'Connell & O'Connell - Bond & Brown

    Delayed by the pandemic but released in 2021, the much-anticipated James Bond film No Time to Die features a darkly beautiful and moody theme song recorded by Billie Eilish. With hints of the signature Bond harmonic flavour and stylish setting, this song is already on its way to becoming a classic, perfectly transcribed for brass band by Christopher Bond.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £25.50

    Polish Adventures - Gavin Somerset

    Composed for the All Saints Wind Band, Sheffield after their trip to Poland in the summer of 2003. This work reflects the different parts of the tour in four continuous movements... PROGRAM NOTES AS THEY APPREAR ON SCORE COVER I don't wish to ramble on with the program notes, do I do believe that if you know the story behind a piece of music, it just puts that extra something into the players performance. In 2002, the All Saints Wind Band, Sheffield, embarked on a 10 day tour of Poland. The group spent 28hrs on a couch packed with instruments, only to arrive finding Poland experiencing its worst summer in 70 years. In 2003, they decided to go back for another go! This time, luxury all the way, no 28hr coach journey, just a 1 1/2hr flight. This piece tells the story of the 2nd tour of Poland in four continuous movements... First the introduction. Early one morning, prepared for the drive to the airport, everyone tired, but excited. A day prior to this, some parents of the children set off in a van driving the instruments to the hotel, some 300 miles away. Bar 13 introduces the "Van" theme. Once arriving at the airport, the movements begin... 1. MORNING FLIGHT A very self explanatory part of the piece, and impressionist in its writing. Flying high over England and the channel, giving a sense of speed we were travelling at (compared to the poor lads in the van somewhere below us!) The Largo before F tells of the short coach journey to the hotel, and settling into what was our new home for 10 days. 2. IN THE STORM The weather was definitely an improvement on last year. So much so, that it became a regular event of the day to go and play rounders in a nearby field. This particular day however, with everyone concentrating hard on the game, it escaped everyone's attention that there was a very large storm creeping over the high mountain range near us. As the title of the movement suggests, the scene involved 25 of us running as fast as we could back to the hotel. Unfortunately, the heavy rain ran faster than us. 3. LAST MEMORIES As most of the people in the band were 18 this year, it was apparent that this would be their last event with the band. Many of the group had grown up together for the last 7 years and so, as the tour came to a close, there was a sense of sadness in the air, but everyone would always have the memories. 4. FINALE & HOME The van and the brave volunteers that went with it, set off the day before the rest of us flew home. This last movement reflect the whole tour, bringing back all the main themes from the different movements before arriving back at the school, just in time to see the van pull up. The "Van" theme makes its presence heard again towards the end. This piece was performed by the Wind Band at the leaving concert of many of the players in the band. I dedicate this piece to the band which is still functioning with new players, and to all those who took part on this tour.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days
  • £25.00

    Pomp and Circumstance March No.2 (Brass Band) - Littlemore, Phillip

    Following the spectacular success of his Pomp & Circumstance March No. 1, which received over 100 performances in its first year, it was almost inevitable that Elgar would write a second. However, what is not commonly known is that the initial sketches for what was to become thePomp & Circumstance March No. 2were written first! Due to the successes of the first march, not least because it now features at every Prom concert, it is forgotten that not only did Elgar submit the manuscript for both marches to his publisher at the same time, but both marches were premiered at the same concert and both performed a few days later at the same Promenade Concert. Duration: 5:00

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £40.00

    Symphony No.1, Finale from (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Rachmaninoff, Sergei - Littlemore, Phillip

    Rachmaninov composed his First Symphony in 1895, at the age of just 22 years. It received its first performance on March 27, 1897, at a Russian Symphony Society concert in St. Petersburg with Alexander Glazunov conducting. The premiere was not well-received, and Rachmaninov himself blamed Glazunov for a lacklustre approach for beating time rather than finding the music. Some contemporary reports even suggested that Glazunov was inebriated when he took to the stage! Despite the disappointment of the premiere performance, Rachmaninov never destroyed the score but left it behind when he left Russia to settle in the West, eventually it was given up for lost. After the composer's death, a two-piano transcription of the symphony surfaced in Moscow, followed by a set of orchestral parts at the conservatory in Saint Petersburg. In March 1945, the symphony was performed in Moscow for the first time since its 1897 premiere. It was a grand success, and this led to a new and more enthusiastic evaluation of the symphony. In March 1948 it received a similarly successful American premiere and the work proceeded to establish itself in the general repertory. The final movement (Allegro con fuoco) is colourful and grand but not without its darkly contrasting, menacing episodes that intensifies its malevolence. It is a work overflowing with ideas demonstrating a strong, highly individual, and self-assured young talent. Duration: 5:40

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £40.00

    Finale from Symphony No. 1 - Sergei Rachmaninov arr. Phillip Littlemore

    Rachmaninov composed his First Symphony in 1895, at the age of just 22 years. It received its first performance on March 27, 1897, at a Russian Symphony Society concert in St. Petersburg with Alexander Glazunov conducting. The premiere was not well-received, and Rachmaninov himself blamed Glazunov for a lacklustre approach for beating time rather than finding the music. Some contemporary reports even suggested that Glazunov was inebriated when he took to the stage!Despite the disappointment of the premiere performance, Rachmaninov never destroyed the score but left it behind when he left Russia to settle in the West, eventually it was given up for lost. After the composer's death, a two-piano transcription of the symphony surfaced in Moscow, followed by a set of orchestral parts at the conservatory in Saint Petersburg. In March 1945, the symphony was performed in Moscow for the first time since its 1897 premiere. It was a grand success, and this led to a new and more enthusiastic evaluation of the symphony. In March 1948 it received a similarly successful American premiere and the work proceeded to establish itself in the general repertory.The final movement (Allegro con fuoco) is colourful and grand but not without its darkly contrasting, menacing episodes that intensifies its malevolence. It is a work overflowing with ideas demonstrating a strong, highly individual, and self-assured young talent.Duration: 5'40"Difficulty: 2nd Section and above

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £25.00

    Pomp and Circumstance March No.1 (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Elgar, Edward - Littlemore, Phillip

    Elgar's Pomp & Circumstance March No. 1was completed in July 1901 although the 'big tune' actually dates from earlier in that same year. It was premiered in Liverpool by its dedicatees, the Liverpool Orchestral Society, on the 19th October. It was repeated in London a few days later by Henry Wood at the Promenade concerts and the result was sensational, the audience roared its applause, and refused to allow the concert to continue. In order to restore order, Wood conducted the march three times - the only time in the history of the Promenade concerts that an orchestral item was accorded a double encore in Wood's lifetime. Duration: 6:40

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £40.00

    Finale from Symphony No. 4 - Pyotr Tchaikovsky arr. Phillip Littlemore

    Tchaikovsky began work on his Symphony No.4 in F minor in the early part of 1877, about the time he began his relationship with his long-term benefactor Nadezhda von Meck. The bulk of the composition was completed by the May of that year, although Tchaikovsky's hastily arranged marriage in the following July to Antonina Miliukova put further work on hold for a while.He returned to working on the symphony in the latter half of the same year, agonising over the orchestration of the much meatier first movement, yet finding the following movements less taxing. The Finale itself erupts with a fortissimo explosion before giving way to the Russian folk song, The Little Birch Tree , which offers much of the thematic material for the movement, until the return of the 'fate' theme from the opening of the symphony itself, which acts as a disturbing presence amongst the more carnival atmosphere of an otherwise buoyant Finale.Duration: 6'00"Difficulty: 2nd Section and above

    Estimated dispatch 5-7 working days
  • £68.99

    English Dances, Set 1, Op. 27: No. 1 - Sir Malcolm Arnold

    English Dances, Set I, opus 27, is a light classic composition that was written for orchestra by the British composer Malcolm Arnold in 1950. The set contains four dances that continue without pause: the individual movements are indicated by the tempo markings. The work came about at the request of Bernard de Nevers, at the time the head of publisher Alfred Lengnick & Co., who asked Arnold to write a suite of dances as an English counterpart to Dvo ak's Slavonic Dances and Bartok's Romanian Folk Dances. The premiere took place in the spring of 1951, played by the London Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Sir Adrian Boult. Following the success of the first set, DeNevers asked the composer to write a second one, which Arnold completed the next year (Op. 33). The Andantino from the first set has been skilfully arranged and orchestrated for brass band by Ray Farr.

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

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