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  • £19.50

    The Farewell Symphony - Joseph Haydn - Neville Buxton

    Composed in 1772, Haydn's Symphony No.45, better known as the "Farewell Symphony" due to the circumstances of which it was composed. Haydn's employer, Prince Nikolaus became so attracted to his Eszterhaza Castle, he spent longer and longer there each year. The court musicians were not allowed their families with them and became increasingly depressed. This symphony was composed in such a way, that during the last movement, one by one, each player blew out their candle, and crept of stage. The idea being that the prince would get the subtle hint. The next day, the court returned to Vienna! Arranged in the same way, players able to walk off one by one, a perfect ending to a concert, or first half.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £27.99

    Evolution - Philip Sparke

    Evolution was commissioned by Kunstfactor for the 4th section of the Dutch National Brass Band Championships (NBK) 2011. It is dedicated to Jappie Dijkstra and the Music Information Centre (MUI), Arnhem, Holland, in acknowledgement of their outstanding work in developing brass band repertoire. The composer writes:-The idea for the piece came when I was reading an article about a branch of Chinese philosophy which is abbreviated as Wu Xing, which has no exact translation but can mean, for example, five elements, five phases or five states of change. It is central to all elements of Chinese thought, including science, philosophy, medicine and astrology, and in simple terms tries to create various cyclic relationships between five elements in all walks of life. An example is: Earth - Metal - Water - Wood - Fire - (Earth) etc. where (in one cycle) earth bears metal, metal changes to liquid (water) when heated, water helps trees grow, wood burns to create fire, fire produces ash (earth) and the cycle continues.I was particularly interested in the cycle of emotions: Meditation - Sorrow - Fear - Anger - Joy - (Meditation) etc. and thought this cyclic principle would provide an effective emotional journey for a piece of music. So Evolution has five equal sections which loosely characterise this emotional cycle. I have tried to make the music grow organically, with minimal repetition, and each movement evolves from the musical elements at the end of the previous one, with the opening material appearing, transformed, at the end of the piece to complete the cycle.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £91.99

    High Flyers - Andrew R. Mackereth

    From the composer: High Flyers are regarded as people with promise and potential.They are winners. This is music for winners.The title, as well as being a play-on-words, implies the nature of the work. It is a bright, optimistic, and upbeat piece attempting to depict an exhilarating ride on flying carpet. The opening rising chords immediately suggest the gentle elevation of the carpets' ascent towards unknown heights, leading to a hint of a first theme in the horns at Fig. B. The first four notes provide the thematic material for the whole work: C F G A.A perpetual sense of movement is achieved through accented quaver chords punctuating the melodic material of the first main theme. Fig. E sees the music of the opening bars fully realised, with flourishes from the euphonium and baritones representing swirling clouds, shooting stars, or passing birds in flight.The same subject is developed into a lyrical second theme with a new lush harmonic treatment, evocative of gliding over an expanse of sparse countryside.This section ends with a note of serenity but is shattered by the urgent insistence of the percussion rhythms.The third section introduces a new idea with a slightly distorted fanfare in the cornets and trombones. This figure suggests for the first time that there may be trouble ahead. In fact, there is no need to fear and the journey can continue without aggravation. This fanfare returns near the end to signal a final note of triumph.A new rhythmic variant of the cell motif emerges as the third theme now transformed by the addition of a triplet figure. The music steadily gains momentum before moving inexorably towards the climactic return of the music and tonality of the opening bars of the piece.

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days

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  • £67.80

    Klabb - Oyvind Moe

    Klabb was written in 2010 for the brass band at Manger Folkehogskule and conductor Bjorn Sagstad. The piece consists of a series of short related episodes based on the whole-tone scale, but intermittently tending towards traditional "major" tonality. "Klabb" can refer to punching someone - and the piece is certainly meant to pack a punch - but the common meaning of the word comes from snow clumping to the undersides of skis, or more generally, something that makes for laborious progress. The whole-tone scale is directionless in that it has no implicit pull towards a tonal center, complicating the creation of meaningful and believable harmonic development. In this respect, the title can be seen as the composer's expression of frustration with his own choice of basic material (it seemed like a good idea at the time ...). For the performers, the unusual fingering combinations are what constitute the "klabb". Good luck, and don't forget to wax!

    Estimated delivery 10-14 days
  • £34.95

    The Descent

    The Descent takes its inspiration from Victorian author Jules Verne; specifically, his work Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.In Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Professor Arronax finds himself a prisoner of the mysterious Captain Nemo, on a remarkable submarine called the Nautilus. Nemo is one of Verne's most memorable characters. He's a man who has turned his back on the world, and his name - Nemo - means 'No Man.' He has vowed never to set foot on dry land ever again. Verne gives his hero's brilliance and benevolence a dark underside - the man's obsessive hate for Empires and Imperialism. Captain Nemo is a genius, an engineer, an artist, an athlete, sometimes a pacifist, sometimes a righter of wrongs, sometimes an out and out villain, and he invented the Nautilus.The Descent is based on the idea of a descent to the depths of the ocean in the Nautilus with Captain Nemo, with the cornet soloist expressing both the anguish and reflective sides of the character. On one hand, a troubled and agitated figure, juxtaposed with the reflective memories of his homeland, children, mother and father. The work was written for and commissioned by Flowers Band as part of their programme of music at Brass in Concert 2019.

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £24.95

    Trip the Light Fantastic - Dan Price

    Horn virtuoso Owen Farr commissioned a new concert item for tenor horn from composer Dan Price in 2009, Trip the Light Fantastic was the resulting work.The piece is music absolute, with no particular aim to tell a story or impose and image or idea on the listener. For anyone who knows Owen, they will know that he has an infectious and engaging presence and a lively sense of humour. His technical and musical ability is universally renowned, as is his enthusiasm and passion for music. The composer has attempted to create a musical caricature of some of these personal qualities and has borrowed the dancing term ‘to trip the light fantastic', "to dance nimbly or lightly, or to move in a pattern to musical accompaniment" as a fitting title to encompass the virtuosic yet jovial nature of the piece.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £32.00

    The Beacons (Score only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    For centuries hilltop beacon fires blazed across the land signals of important happenings or warnings of invasion. This music tells no specific story but the titles of the four thematically related sections are a guide to the idea: The Beacons; Far Horizons; The Invaders; Celebration. The first movement has something of the character of the march and the fanfare; spirited and tightly driving, it promises most of the thematic material of the work. The second is largelt tranquil and is thinly scores with solo passages. The third has the most dramatic potential; its energy and conflict subsides to a lament and a tolling bell before a vigorous rounding off. Appropriately, the fourth movement is in a merry-making mood, and the jubilant music concludes with fragment statements of the main themes. The Beacons was first performed by IMI Yorkshire Imperial Band (James Scott) at the 'Concert of the Century', celebrating the Centenary of the British Bandsman, at the Free Trade Hall, Manchester, on 5 September 1987. Duration: 12:30

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £42.00

    The Beacons (Parts only) - Ray Steadman-Allen

    For centuries hilltop beacon fires blazed across the land signals of important happenings or warnings of invasion. This music tells no specific story but the titles of the four thematically related sections are a guide to the idea: The Beacons; Far Horizons; The Invaders; Celebration. The first movement has something of the character of the march and the fanfare; spirited and tightly driving, it promises most of the thematic material of the work. The second is largelt tranquil and is thinly scores with solo passages. The third has the most dramatic potential; its energy and conflict subsides to a lament and a tolling bell before a vigorous rounding off. Appropriately, the fourth movement is in a merry-making mood, and the jubilant music concludes with fragment statements of the main themes. The Beacons was first performed by IMI Yorkshire Imperial Band (James Scott) at the 'Concert of the Century', celebrating the Centenary of the British Bandsman, at the Free Trade Hall, Manchester, on 5 September 1987. Duration: 12:30

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days