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  • £69.95

    Partita - Score and Parts - Philip Sparke

    Partita was written in 1989 to a commission from Eikanger/Bj?rsvik Musikklag (Norway) who were European Champions at the time.There are three movements.1 The first movement is almost a miniature concerto for band. It opens with a relentless quaver passage in the basses, which builds until the whole band is involved. Horns and baritones are first to take centre-stage in close harmony and the euphoniums and basses follow them. These forces combine to introduce the cornets that have a 10-part fanfare to themselves before the trombones interrupt. The opening quaver figure returns, somewhat ominously, and, after the full band recalls previous material, brings the movement to a close.2. Starts with a cornet solo over a pulsating accompaniment after which the band builds to a noble tune on the trombones. The full band takes over and brings back the opening cornet tune with which the soloist, with the aid of a euphonium counter-melody, quietly ends the movement, leading directly into:3. A sparkling vivo, which opens with the fanfare-like figures throughout the band until a solo cornet, emerges with an acrobatic tune. The whole band takes this up until horns; baritones and trombones introduce an energetic second subject, which leads to a full band climax in the form of a jubilant chorale. This died away to reintroduce the opening fanfare against a new theme from the trombones, which eventually leads back to a recapitulation. We are then thrown headlong into a 12/8 presto, which hurtles to a coda, which recalls the opening themes.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    Partita - Score Only - Philip Sparke

    Partita was written in 1989 to a commission from Eikanger/Bj?rsvik Musikklag (Norway) who were European Champions at the time.There are three movements.1 The first movement is almost a miniature concerto for band. It opens with a relentless quaver passage in the basses, which builds until the whole band is involved. Horns and baritones are first to take centre-stage in close harmony and the euphoniums and basses follow them. These forces combine to introduce the cornets that have a 10-part fanfare to themselves before the trombones interrupt. The opening quaver figure returns, somewhat ominously, and, after the full band recalls previous material, brings the movement to a close.2. Starts with a cornet solo over a pulsating accompaniment after which the band builds to a noble tune on the trombones. The full band takes over and brings back the opening cornet tune with which the soloist, with the aid of a euphonium counter-melody, quietly ends the movement, leading directly into:3. A sparkling vivo, which opens with the fanfare-like figures throughout the band until a solo cornet, emerges with an acrobatic tune. The whole band takes this up until horns; baritones and trombones introduce an energetic second subject, which leads to a full band climax in the form of a jubilant chorale. This died away to reintroduce the opening fanfare against a new theme from the trombones, which eventually leads back to a recapitulation. We are then thrown headlong into a 12/8 presto, which hurtles to a coda, which recalls the opening themes.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.50

    Cheer Up, Charlie - Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newman

    This fresh new cornet solo comes from one of the greatest loved movies of all time. Featuring alongside musical hits such as Pure Imagination and The Candy Man, 'Cheer Up, Charlie' is probably one of the most underrated musical numbers from the film, Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory. In the film, the song is sung by Charlie's mother, whilst young Charlie ponders the life he believes lay ahead for him. With a complex chord structure, the band parts remain interesting throughout whilst the lyrical solo line can shine in this beautiful, melodic work. A great 'slow melody' solo item and one that works on both concert and contest stages.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £74.95

    Eden - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £74.95

    Eden - Score & Parts - John Pickard

    This work was commissioned by the Brass Band Heritage Trust as the test piece for the final of the 2005 Besson National Brass Band Championship, held at the Royal Albert Hall, London.The score is prefaced by the final lines from Milton’s epic poem Paradise Lost (completed in 1663), in which Adam and Eve, expelled from Paradise, make their uncertain way into the outside world:“…The world was all before them, where to chooseTheir place of rest, and providence their guide:They hand in hand with wandering steps and slow,Through Eden took their solitary way.”My work is in three linked sections. In the first, the characters of Adam, Eve and the serpent guarding the Tree of Knowledge are respectively represented by solo euphonium, cornet and trombone. The music opens in an idyllic and tranquil mood and leads into a duet between euphonium and cornet. Throughout this passage the prevailing mood darkens, though the soloists seem to remain oblivious to the increasingly fraught atmosphere. A whip-crack announces the malevolent appearance of the solo trombone who proceeds to engage the solo cornet in a sinister dialogue.The second section interprets the Eden story as a modern metaphor for the havoc mankind has inflicted upon the world, exploiting and abusing its resources in the pursuit of wealth. Though certainly intended here as a comment on the present-day, it is by no means a new idea: Milton himself had an almost prescient awareness of it in Book I of his poem, where men, led on by Mammon:“…Ransacked the centre and with impious handsRifled the bowels of their mother earthFor treasures better hid. Soon had his crewOpened into the hill a spacious woundAnd digged out ribs of gold.”So this section is fast and violent, at times almost manic in its destructive energy. At length a furious climax subsides and a tolling bell ushers in the third and final section.This final part is slow, beginning with an intense lament featuring solos for tenor-horn, fl?gel-horn and repiano cornet and joined later by solo baritone, soprano cornet, Eb-bass and Bb-bass.At one stage in the planning of the work it seemed likely that the music would end here – in despair. Then, mid-way through writing it, I visited the extraordinary Eden Project in Cornwall. Here, in a disused quarry – a huge man-made wound in the earth – immense biomes, containing an abundance of plant species from every region of the globe, together with an inspirational education programme, perhaps offer a small ray of hope for the future. This is the image behind the work’s conclusion and the optimism it aims to express is real enough, though it is hard-won and challenged to the last.John Pickard 2005

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £79.95

    Orion - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Orion was named after the giant huntsman in Greek mythology and is a prominent constellation located on the celestial equator and visible throughout the world. It is one of the most conspicuous and recognisable constellations in the night sky. This piece and its inspiration were composed as a tone poem creating a musical picture of this amazing phenomenon.The opening introduces the constellation. Starting mysteriously with the percussion and basses this section develops a series of rhythmic and harmonic interludes from the upper brass. As this introduction develops, the melodic line lead by the Solo Cornet and Euphonium builds as the accompanying instruments increase in their rhythmic complexity. This section climaxes with a short fanfare motif which will be a prominent theme throughout this piece.The fast rhythmic section that follows serves as a technical test for the players. The thematic device introduced by the Solo Cornets is passed around various soloists and sections within the ensemble. This part of the tone poem gives the opportunity for the ensemble to highlight their technical prowess. The fanfare motif returns to conclude this section and takes the piece into the slow middle movement.Motifs heard earlier are mixed with new ideas in this slow section which give an opportunity for a variety of soloists to demonstrate their musical prowess. After the various solo passages and cadenzas, the mood shifts dramatically to a more ominous section that builds in texture and dynamic. Concluding with our returning fanfare motif the piece then builds in momentum towards our finale section.This finale is a technical showcase which will further test the playing ability and stamina of soloists, small groups and the full ensemble. Using prominent musical themes heard throughout this piece the music builds to a glorious conclusion fitting with wonderful constellation.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    Road to Run - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    The piece starts with a simple rhythmic pulse which is the basis of the entire work. This cell provides a platform for the piece to grow and develop starting with the first theme played by the euphoniums, all the way through to the conclusion performed in full gusto by the whole ensemble. The various motifs introduced throughout the opening of the piece are passed between the ensemble before the introduction of the three soloists.The central section of the piece features the Solo Trombone, Cornet and Euphonium as they take turns to play a jazz fusion solo whilst having some musical interplay with each other at the front of the stage. After this solo passage, the music then features the various sections within the ensemble, which pays homage to Weather Reports' famous "Birdland". In a jazz fused cannon, each new independent musical phrase is performed by the various sections standing. Starting with the Horns then Solo Cornets, Back Row and Flugal and finally the Baritones and Trombones.Once the different sections of the ensemble are featured, the piece then moves into the final stages. This section sees a reprieve of the opening material heard at the beginning, but further developed with the various melodic motifs passed around the ensemble. The ending builds on this material towards a rousing conclusion."Road to Run" is an up tempo, high energy concert work that has that 'feel-good factor' from start to finish. The idea behind the title is based on the feel and structure of the piece which takes the listener on a musical journey. And at 150 beats per minute - you could put it in your headphones and find your own 'Road to Run'.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £27.50

    Lux Aeterna - Score & Parts - Philip Harper

    The title Lux Aeterna (Eternal Light) can be interpreted on a number of levels. Musically it has a rather mystical feel to it, and the single note with which the piece begins continues uninterrupted throughout, like an inextinguishable flame, or a constant source of hope. There are lyrical and song-like solo lines for cornet, flugel and euphonium. In a recent review Paul Hindmarsh described the piece as a touching new work by Philip Harper that would have got my vote for best new work for its technical ingenuity if not its ‘wow factor’.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £14.50

    Lux Aeterna - Score Only - Philip Harper

    The title Lux Aeterna (Eternal Light) can be interpreted on a number of levels. Musically it has a rather mystical feel to it, and the single note with which the piece begins continues uninterrupted throughout, like an inextinguishable flame, or a constant source of hope. There are lyrical and song-like solo lines for cornet, flugel and euphonium. In a recent review Paul Hindmarsh described the piece as a touching new work by Philip Harper that would have got my vote for best new work for its technical ingenuity if not its ‘wow factor’.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £29.95

    Island Whirl - Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Island Whirl was commissioned by Margaret Milligan who wanted a brand new piece of music composed as a present for Ian, her husband for his 70th birthday. Ian Milligan is a keen and dedicated musician and he is the musical director of Callendar Brass, based in Callendar near Stirling in Scotland.Margaret contacted me about the possibility of composing a short lively piece which had a Scottish theme that would be ideal for Callendar Brass Band and any other ensemble to get their teeth into. This piece takes its inspiration from the traditional Scottish folk song ‘An Eriskay Love Lilt’ which is a particular favourite of both Margaret and Ian.With thunderous Celtic drums the piece opens in a whirlwind of sound with fanfare brass and an off-stage soloist that can perform using either the cornet or trumpet. After the exciting opening, the brass and drums die away to allow the off-stage soloist to air the traditional tune ‘An Eriskay Love Lilt’.The beautiful haunting melody, keeping its originality throughout undergoes a series of changes in the accompanying harmonic material before dying away to allow the Celtic drums to return. The percussion whip the band into a frenzy as the piece gets faster and faster. Just prior to the final notes the band diminuendo to allow one last closing statement from the Eriskay Love Lilt lead by the off-stage soloist before the ensemble charge to a dramatic close.When performing this piece I would recommend the off-stage soloist taking a position somewhere in the audience, so they can almost feel part of the performance. In addition, with the two tom-tom parts that represent the Celtic drums, bands should make the most of showcasing them by getting the two drummers out to the front of the band to perform. The ideal stage position would be with the players set up in stereo with one player in front of the soprano cornet and the other in front of the solo trombone.With the various choreographed movements from both the off-stage soloist and the percussionists. This piece is a great addition to any concert repertoire and is an ideal showcase for bands who want to try something a little different.I wish Ian at 70 years young, all the very best with his music making in the many years to come and I hope this piece, composed especially for him and Callender Brass brings them many years of musical enjoyment.Paul Lovatt-Cooper

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days