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  • £34.99

    Shackleton's Cross (Cornet Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Goodall, Howard - Hall, Daniel

    Shackleton's Cross was inspired by a painting created in 1957 by the English artist Edward Seago (1910 1974). The title refers to a cross which was erected to the memory of Sir Ernest Shackleton, who led a number of explorations to the Antarctic. Shackleton died in 1922 whilst on a Polar expedition, and the cross can be found on a promontory at the entrance to the bay at Grytviken Whaling Station in South Georgia. The painting is owned by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, and was part of an exhibition at Buckingham Palace from October 2011 to April 2012. Originally scored for oboe, trumpet and small orchestra, Daniel Hall's sensitive arrangement for trumpet or cornet and brass band follows the composer's alternative version for solo trumpet and organ, created for Crispian Steele-Perkins (trumpet) and David Goode (organ). Duration: 5.00

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days

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  • £21.50

    Ecstasy Of Gold - Ennio Morricone - Andi Cook

    This energetic piece, one of the many qualities of Ennio Morricone's music, has recently been brought back into the public eye with its use in the new 'Health Lottery" Adverts and many other TV appearances. The music comes from the iconic picture "The Good, The Bad & The Ugly" while the character Tuco searches for the $200,000 hidden in a graveyard. Since then, its been a hit world wide, being used in several media campaigns. its success can be attributed to the strong, powerful melody that last long in the memory. Now for the first time, arranged for band by Andi Cook, the brass band can enjoy the powerful piece that follows its delicate opening for Solo Horn. To download the Solo Cornet part, please CLICK HERE . To download the Solo Horn part, please CLICK HERE . To download the Solo Euphonium part, please CLICK HERE . To download the playback audio to play along to, please RIGHT CLICK HERE & Save As .

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £35.00

    Cranborne Chase - Philip Harper

    Cranborne Chase was commissioned by the Charles Church Camberley Band in 2011 in memory of solo horn player and life-long member Libby Godden.Libby joined the band in 1966 which marked the start of a long association, during which she progressed to the solo horn position, recruited four family members to play with the band, and had spells on the committee as publicity officer and chairman. Most recently she led the Training Ensemble in her role as Assistant Bandmaster. Libby continued to be active with the band despite a diagnosis of cancer, which finally claimed her life in February 2011.Programme notes from the composer, Philip Harper:The Music: As well as invoking the joyous spirit befitting Libby’s approach to life, there are several musical ideas woven into the score. After a brief introduction, the main theme uses the musical letters of Libby’s surname: G, O(A), D, D, E, N(G), whilst the harmonic progression here is based on that of the slow movement of Edward Gregson’s Partita for Brass Band, one of Libby’s favourite passages of music.To further imbue the piece with Libby’s persona, the lyrical theme is first introduced as a traditional brass band quartet (two cornets, horn and euphonium), one of her favourite musical genres.After the first rehearsal of the piece the band members, with the composer’s blessing, decided on the name Cranborne Chase, which is the name of a place in Dorset with which Libby Godden had a great affinity.Raising Funds for Cancer Research UK. The Music Company (UK) Ltd has been involved in charitable work for many years through its Brass Band Aid series of music and continuing support of UGive2Uganda. Through publishing Cranborne Chase, The Music Company is extending its charitable support by helping to raise funds for the Cancer Research UK charity, in memory of Libby Godden (a band-friend since childhood of Clair Tomalin, Business Director of The Music Company (UK) Ltd).A donation will therefore be made by The Music Company (UK) Ltd for every purchased set of this piece. There is a hope that every band in the UK will have Cranborne Chase as part of their library and included in their concert programmes, enabling a significant amount of money to be raised for Cancer Research UK through the enjoyment of music.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £34.99

    Shackleton's Cross - Howard Goodall

    Shackleton s Cross was inspired by a painting created in 1957 by the English artist Edward Seago (1910 1974). The title refers to a cross which was erected to the memory of Sir Ernest Shackleton, who led a number of explorations to the Antarctic. Shackleton died in 1922 whilst on a Polar expedition, and the cross can be found on a promontory at the entrance to the bay at Grytviken Whaling Station in South Georgia. The painting is owned by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, and was part of an exhibition at Buckingham Palace from October 2011 to April 2012.Originally scored for oboe, trumpet and small orchestra, Daniel Hall s sensitive arrangement for trumpet or cornet and brass band follows the composer s alternative version for solo trumpet and organ, created for Crispian Steele-Perkins (trumpet) and David Goode (organ).

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £29.95

    TO WIN THE WORLD (Cornet and Trombone Double Trio with Brass Band Set) - Stephen Bulla

    This double trio (three cornets and three trombones) was written for the National Capital Band of The Salvation Army in memory of Colonel William Maltby and is based on his own chorus, 'Keep on marching with a fighting faith'. Each solo part is of equal importance so six competent soloists will be required in order to make the piece sparkle!

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £30.00

    My Little Welsh Home - Traditional

    This is a Welsh song by W S Gwynne Williams, which I have arranged in memory of my mother. It is for Brass Band, with optional vocal solo or unison choir. My mother was born, Doreen Davies, on 27th November 1918, in Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, a small town in South West Wales. She had a beautiful voice, and met my father, Bill Paton, during World War II. She was singing in a troop concert at the County Theatre in her home town, and my father was the MC. Throughout her life, my mother and father entertained, and she was singing right up until the final months of her life. She spent many years of her life in Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, a seaside town in South West England, and it was here that she passed away on 20th September 24. During the last several months of her life, she often referred to the song “My Little Welsh Home”. Here are the words.I am dreaming of the mountains of my home, Of the mountains where in childhood I would roam; I have dwelt ‘neath Southern skies, Where the summer never dies, But my heart is in the mountains of my home.I can see the little homestead on the hill, I can hear the magic music of the rill; There is nothing to compare, With the love that was once there, In that little homestead on the hill.I can see the quiet churchyard down below, Where the mountain breezes wander to and fro; And when God my soul will keep, It is there I want to sleep, With those dear old folks that loved me long ago.Looking at the words, I can see why it meant so much to her. Haverfordwest is at the foot of the Preseli Mountains, and her home and Church were at the top of a hill.My mothers’ ashes were taken back to her own little Welsh home, and laid to rest in the grounds of the Church where she was Christened, Confirmed and Married.The Welsh Bass-Baritone singer Bryn Terfel has recorded this song on one of his CDs. It has also been released on “New Horizons”, by Aled Jones.Roger Thorne, composer, arranger and of Thornes Music, also MD of Wem Jubilee Band, was very complimentary about this arrangement, (following a concert in which they featured a Welsh lady singer), referring to the use of tone colours, harmony and the atmospheric sound.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days
  • £50.00

    Montage (Score only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £60.00

    Montage (Parts only) - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries. The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated. A chaconne follows - the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement's structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne's continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles. The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon. The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target. Duration: 16:00

    Estimated delivery 7-10 days
  • £94.00

    Montage - Peter Graham

    Each of the movements of the symphony take as their starting point forms originating in music of the 16th and 17th centuries.The first, an intrada, introduces the main thematic material (based on the interval of a minor third) in its embryonic state. As the piece progresses, this material is developed and manipulated in a variety of ways. The interval of the third remains central to the overall scheme of the work, even unifying the three movements on a tonal plane (I: F (minor); II: A flat (major); III: C flat (minor). The internal structure of the intrada is an arch form: ABCBA, roughly modelled on the first movement of Concerto for Orchestra by Witold Lutoslawski, to whose memory the movement is dedicated.A chaconne follows – the basic material now transformed into expansive solo lines underpinned by a recurring sequence of five chords (again, a third apart). The movement’s structure combines both ternary form and golden section principles and the chaconne’s continuous cycle of chords may be visualised as circles.The final movement, a rondo, bears the dramatic weight of the entire work, as the underlying tonal tensions surface. A musical journey ensues, making diversions through lyrical territories as well as through more spiky, jazz-flavoured ones. The aural (and visual) montage is perhaps most apparent towards the climax of the piece, where three keys and polyrhythms sound simultaneously in the upper brass, xylophone, horns, and timpani. The climax itself combines the lyrical music heard earlier with the rondo theme, now presented by cornets and trombones in canon.The teleological thrust of the movement (if not the entire work) can be symbolized by the flight of an arrow, as it steers a predetermined course towards its target.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days