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  • £24.95

    Believe Me If All Those Endearing Young Charms - Simone Mantia - David Childs

    "Believe Me, if All Those Endearing Young Charms" is a popular folk song of early 19th century Ireland and America. However, Simone Mantia, a pioneer of American euphonium music, composed this theme and variations on the melody in the early 20th century and it remains a staple of the solo euphonium repertoire today.Mantia was born in Palermo Sicily in 1873, but immigrated to the United States at the age of 17. He was the first master of euphonium to work in the era of recorded sound and as a result, left a legacy as euphonium soloist on several Sousa and Pryor band recordings. His Believe Me if All those Endearing Young Charms in one such track from that Legacy.An arrangement for euphonium and brass band was later made by Stanley Boddington, but here we have a 21st century arrangement by one of today's euphonium stars, David Childs.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days
  • £20.00 £20.00

    Abide With Me - William H Monk - Anthony Wakefield

    To purchase this music, you will need to contact Anthony directly, at

    One of the world`s most popular hymns, this time in an accompanying role to one of the most popular military bugle calls, so bringing the two together to commemorate those who we have lost.The Last Post was originally played at the end of the day as a call for soldiers to retire to their beds. It went on to become a call to remember the departed.Many apologies to my 'regulars' for yet another upload. This is due to Scorch playback problems again. This, my latest update had the solo cornet sounding a gunshot instead of it`s solo G at the 6th to last bar. How ironic can one get!?!

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  • £34.95

    Glory, Hallelujah (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Larsson, Kevin

    This bright and fun setting of the classic Salvation Army song 'Glory, Hallelujah!', which first appeared in 1899, stylistically embraces music associated with Hollywood. Behind all the 'razzmatazz', the direct message is always clear: 'The devil and me we don't agree, Glory, Hallelujah! I hate him and he hates me Glory, Hallelujah!'

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £17.50

    Glory, Hallelujah (Brass Band - Score only) - Larsson, Kevin

    This bright and fun setting of the classic Salvation Army song 'Glory, Hallelujah!', which first appeared in 1899, stylistically embraces music associated with Hollywood. Behind all the 'razzmatazz', the direct message is always clear: 'The devil and me we don't agree, Glory, Hallelujah! I hate him and he hates me Glory, Hallelujah!'

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £25.50

    Bless 'Em All - Various - Gavin Somerset

    Keeping spirits high during World War II was essential, and music played a huge part. Darrol Barry's excellent arrangement 'Keep Smiling Through' has been pleasing audiences for years and can probably be found in most brass bands libraries across the country. This new release of popular war time songs including 'Wish Me Luck, As You Wave Me Goodbye', 'We're Going To Hang Out The Washing', 'Kiss Me Goodnight Sgt. Major', 'Good Morning', 'Bless 'Em All' and the highlight of the piece, the slow, hair raising middle movement 'Apple Blossom Time', is being released to coincide with the 70th Anniversary of the Battle Of Britain. All of these songs were sung as the London population camped out in the underground stations. This arrangement will get the feet tapping as audiences sing along to the lively pieces and then sends shivers down their spines with the gorgeous 'Apple Blossom Time' featuring in the middle of the medley. This is a piece not to be missed and should belong in all bands libraries.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £21.50

    Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas - Hugh Martin & Ralph lane - Hannah Hawken

    Some musical numbers require little introduction and the hit that is 'Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas' has been entertaining audiences since its first appearance back in 1944. Original sung by Julie Garland in the MGM musical 'Meet Me In St. Louis', the song was later revised and re-recorded. It was this second incarnation that is the popular song that we know today. Christmas solos are a novelty and now, arranged by Hannah Hawkden, this lovely little number fits perfectly into any Christmas concert giving your band and audience something fresh this year.

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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  • £98.00 £98.00
    Buy from Superbrass

    KirkFeld

    Grant Kirkhope Grant Kirkhope is a BAFTA nominated British composer who has created the soundtrack for video games that have sold in excess of 30 million copies. From “GoldenEye” to “Banjo-Kazooie”, “Viva Pi?ata” to “Donkey Kong”, “Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning” to “Civilization: Beyond Earth” and “Perfect Dark” to “Castle of Illusion starring Mickey Mouse”. He has also recently scored the feature film “The King’s Daughter” starring Pierce Brosnan and William Hurt and is currently working on “Yooka Laylee” and “Dropzone”. Grant’s score for “Viva Pi?ata” was nominated by BAFTA in the Original Score category in its 2007 awards. Grant is represented by the prestigious Gorfaine/Schwartz Agency by Cheryl Tiano and Kevin Korn. Grant has a degree in music from the Royal Northern College of Music, Manchester, where he majored in classical trumpet, is a green card holder and now lives in Agoura Hills, LA with his wife and two children. “Ian and I first met when we were around 15 years old. We both played in our county orchestra, the North Yorkshire Schools Symphony Orchestra (I was a trumpet player). I think we hit it off straight away, as we were definitely a couple of cheeky kids, if you know what I mean! We both ended up playing in Rowntree Mackintosh Brass Band for a while too which Ian’s Dad, Trevor conducted. We bumped into each other again when we both went for the Shell/LSO Scholarship. I got to the area finals in Manchester so I was pretty pleased with myself but then I saw Ian and I knew it was all over! Of course Ian went on to win and the rest is history. I saw him again when I was attending the Royal Northern College of Music around 1983 by which time Ian had just got the principal chair at the Halle Orchestra. Then I guess 30 something years went by as we both went about our lives and lost touch. We re-kindled our friendship due to his wife really. She emailed me to say it was Ian’s 50th birthday and she was collecting stories from all his friends over the years. After that we got back in touch and then one day on Facebook I got a message from him in typical dry Yorkshire fashion “now then Grant, I had a listen to your music and I think it’s good, how about writing a piece for me ?” I was a little bit unsure at first but of course I loved Ian’s playing and of course I said yes. Over a Skype call in 2016, he asked me what I thought I’d write. I said since I live in LA I’d like to write a “Hollywood” trombone piece. Imagine if John Williams had written a piece for solo trombone, that’s what I’d like to write - well I’d certainly like to try” – Grant Kirkhope

  • £25.00

    Cantus (on E.D.) - Peter Meechan

    From Leanne Stamp:"As musicians,I think we really identify ourselves and our existence on being musicians. And we collect these teachings and bondsalong our path. But whendoes it happen? When does that moment happen that someone becomes an integral part of the fabric that makes you who you are? Or when can you pinpointthe momentthat you realize that a person was essential in your path? I don’t think we know. And all too many times it isn’t until someone is gone that we truly reflect and try to figure it out.When Ed De'Ath joined our band (Las Vegas Brass Band) he hadn’t played in over 20 years. He heard the brass band and decided he wanted to go back to playing, and within a few weeks became a member of LVBB.He had grown up playing in Canada, where his father was a brass musician too, and Ed was quite an accomplished young euphonium player competing in competitions and playing in Salvation Army bands.But life happened and it lead him away from playing.Even though I was in LVBB a few years before Edjoined, he quickly became an essential part of what makes that group a family. I spent the better part of a decade playing in the same section as him and then about 5 years sitting next to him on either side.Ed always took a sincere interest in myplaying. Praising the good and giving constructive criticism for improvement. For about two years almost every otherSaturdaywasspent playing duets at his house.I left to study at the RNCM in Manchester, UK, before returning to Las Vegas.My first rehearsal back from the RNCM Ed looked at me said, “here you go kiddo, you’ve earned this solo seat”.There was no ego. Only the wish for me to reach my potential. It was always so apparent with Ed the love he shared for the younger musicians and his desire for them to succeed.Ed lit up the room with his enthusiasm and love for music – he just truly loved being there. That special quality that makes a band a family...he knew and treasured that.And although Ed wasn’t my teacher per say, he was an integral part of my fabric.The way Ed left was sudden. He had been fighting bladder cancer in and off for quite a while but things were looking up. Tests were clear. And then a very aggressive pancreatic cancer stole him very quickly, almost without warning.And I will never forget how I felt getting that call. We decided to have rehearsal that night. And for one reason. Because Ed would’ve wanted us to.I will always be grateful to Ed. Grateful that I got tolearn things from him, receive advice, enjoy his company, and feel his love – part of him is with me whenever I play."

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £34.95

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine - Phil Lawrence - -

    A Slow Ride in a Static Machine was inspired some time ago when my (late) Father came to visit me "down in London" as he put it. It was based not on one of his circular mishaps, but on several! He was always directed carefully, but refused to carry a map in the car! At one time when I lived in North London I would meet him outside the capital, and he would then follow be back to my place, but after I moved to East London I made him bite the navigational bullet and transverse the 'M25 Orbital'. His main problem seemed to be getting off this mesmerising circular cark park. He would often phone (in a weary tone) from the Dartford Tunnel (which is 5 junctions past the one he needed to get off at), asking me to, "bring him in" so to speak. I would always refuse. And then, he would do the opposite (especially when travelling at night), he would phone me up from near Cambridge (he'd gone the wrong way up the M11 away from London by 45 miles), and would ask where he was!The title is obviously a play on John Adams' composition, A Short Ride In A Fast Machine. This quirky tone poem starts as a wind-up by using those unwanted intervals of augmented 4th's and minor 9th's & 7th's in the main tune, before hearing the road works, the juggernauts multi horns, fender-benders, ambulance and police sirens! This then all works to a back beat on kit. The wind-up start gets to an almost Go-Go 1960's Disco middle section (the nostalgic hay-days of the open road), where our wind-up tune falls into place and we all relax as we can now drive at 42.1 mph! We DC, and then get into a right car mess in the Coda! Phil Lawrence.

    Estimated delivery 3-5 days