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  • £23.95

    Living Legend (Cornet Solo with Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wiffin, Rob

    This short, lyrical solo was named for a musician friend who was proud of having been described as a living legend. Although not obviously technically demanding it requires good control and careful phrasing as well as sensitive accompaniment from the band.- Rob WiffinDuration: 3.30

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £45.20

    The Living Daylights - John Barry & Pal Waaktaar

    Estimated dispatch 10-14 working days

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  • £108.10

    The Living Daylights - John Barry

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days
  • £34.95

    The Music of Living (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Forrest, Dan - Wainwright, Andrew

    Arrangement of Dan Forrest's choralanthem.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £79.95

    Lost Village of Imber, The - Christopher Bond

    The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain had been inhabited for over one thousand years when it was evacuated in 1943 to make way for military training in the Second World War. At the time, with preparations for the Allied invasion of Europe underway, most villagers put up no resistance, despite being upset, with the belief that they'd return once the war had concluded. To this day, Imber and its surrounding land remain a military training ground. The villagers never returned, and just the shell of what was once a community remains. Structured in three movements, it is on this very real story that the work is based, setting out the series of events of 1943 in chronological order. The first movement, On Imber Downe, portrays a sense of jollity and cohesiveness - a community of individuals living and working together before news of the evacuation had broken. Sounds of the village are heard throughout, not least in a series of percussive effects - the anvil of the blacksmith; the cowbell of the cattle and the bells of the church. The second movement, The Church of St. Giles, begins mysteriously and this sonorous, atmospheric opening depicts Imber in its desolate state and the apprehension of residents as they learn they have to leave their homes. Amidst this is the Church, a symbol of hope for villagers who one day wish to return, portrayed with a sweeping melodic passage before the music returns to the apprehension of villagers facing eviction around their sadness at losing their rural way of life. In complete contrast, the third movement, Imemerie Aeternum, portrays the arrival of the military, complete with the sounds of the ammunition, firing and tanks - sounds which were all too familiar to those living in the surround areas. To close, the Church of St. Giles theme returns in a triumphant style, representing the idea that the church has always been, even to this day, a beacon of hope for the villagers and local community - both the centrepiece and pinnacle of a very real story. The work was commissioned by Bratton Silver Band in celebration of the band's 160th Anniversary, with funding from the Arts Council National Lottery Project Grants Fund and the Brass Bands England Norman Jones Trust Fund.

    Estimated dispatch 5-10 working days
  • £64.95

    Dance Spirit (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Wiffin, Rob

    Dance Spirit is a three movement suite of dances comprising Stomping Dance, Waltz Interlude and Duende linked by solo dancer cadenzas. It started life as the wind band piece Spirit of the Dance. In it I attempted to capture some of the elements of this most fundamental of human activities, the urge to move our bodies to the rhythm of the music. In re-working it for brass band I extended the duration of the Waltz Interlude and increased the technical level in some areas with the intention of making it a suitable test piece.Stomping Dance - The suite starts with perhaps the most basic dance feeling, the desire to stomp our feet to the music, unrefined, no knowledge of steps needed. The heavy stomp is not always present in the music here, and sometimes you can sense the dancers trying something a little more refined, but it is always lurking in the background, ready to draw us back to the elemental rhythm of the beat.Waltz Interlude - Of course, dance does not always have to have heat, it can be elegant and restrained, emphasising fluidity of line and movement. In the waltz it is occasionally suspended by the held poses before the motion starts again. Unlike the outer movements, the Waltz Interlude is cool, danced in moonlight rather than under the sun. The two dancers sometimes move as one and at other times the man provides a frame for the more intricate arabesques of his partner.Duende - During my time living in Spain I went to watch some flamenco dancing. I was expecting the normal tourist cliches but the dancers were serious students of Flamenco Nuevo y Viejo (new and old). They performed with passion to some pounding asymmetric rhythms and their performance was the inspiration for Duende. Duende as a term is hard to define. It is a spirit of performance - that moment when you are right in the middle of the creative spirit of the music. It is about soul and a heightened state of emotion. Federico Garcia Lorca wrote: I have heard an old maestro of the guitar say, The duende is not in the throat; the duende climbs up inside you, from the soles of the feet. Meaning this: it is not a question of ability, but of true, living style, of blood, of the most ancient culture, of spontaneous creation.- Rob WiffinDuration: 13.45

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

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  • £79.95

    The Lost Village of Imber (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Bond, Christopher

    The Lost Village of Imber was commissioned by Bratton Silver Band in 2019 in celebration of 160 years of the band; 1859-2019. Structured in three movements, the complete work was premiered by Cory Band at Wiltshire Music Centre in February 2020.The village of Imber on Salisbury Plain had been inhabited for over one thousand years when it was evacuated in 1943 to make way for military training in the Second World War. At the time, with preparations for the Allied invasion of Europe underway, most villagers put up no resistance, despite being upset, with the belief that they'd return once the war had concluded. To this day, Imber and its surrounding land remain a military training ground. The villagers never returned, and just the shell of what was once a community remains.Structured in three movements, it is on this very real story that the work is based, setting out the series of events of 1943 in chronological order.The first movement, On Imber Downe, portrays a sense of jollity and cohesiveness, a community of individuals living and working together before news of the evacuation had broken. Sounds of the village are heard throughout, not least in a series of percussive effects, the anvil of the blacksmith; the cowbell of the cattle and the bells of the church.The second movement, The Church of St. Giles, begins mysteriously and this sonorous, atmospheric opening depicts Imber in its desolate state and the apprehension of residents as they learn they have to leave their homes. Amidst this is the Church, a symbol of hope for villagers who one day wish to return, portrayed with a sweeping melodic passage before the music returns to the apprehension of villagers facing eviction around their sadness at losing their rural way of life.In complete contrast, the third movement, Imemerie Aeternum, portrays the arrival of the military, complete with the sounds of the ammunition, firing and tanks, sounds which were all too familiar to those living in the surround areas. To close, the Church of St. Giles theme returns in a triumphant style, representing the idea that the church has always been, even to this day, a beacon of hope for the villagers and local community, both the centrepiece and pinnacle of a very real story.Duration: 13.30

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days