Searching for Wind Band Music? Visit the Wind Band Music Shop
We've found 10 matches for your search. Order by

Results

  • £19.50

    Staff Of Faith - Swiss Traditional - Gavin Somerset

    No concert programme is complete these days without a hymn tune being given the treatment that only a brass band sound can deliver. It is therefore refreshing when a lesser known work becomes available for bands to perform. This Swiss traditional melody has grown in popularity over the last decade and is heard in churches across the globe sang to the words 'My Faith It Is An Oaken Staff' by Thomas Lynch. This setting by Gavin Somerset uses the full colours of the brass band spectrum and allows several instrumentalists the chance shine in this warm and entertaining work with a big finish ending.

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days

     PDF View Music

  • £35.74

    Love Divine (Blaenwern) (Brass Band) William Rowlands arr. Kenneth Downie

    This delightful setting for brass band by Kenneth Downie is based on the much loved hymn Love Divine, All Loves Excelling, alternatively known as Blaenwern. An optional organ part which will enhance the last verse is included. Kenneth Downie writes: 'It has been a delight to work on this wonderful Welsh hymn tune called Blaenwern, a tune which perfectly suits the majestic words by Charles Wesley, 'Love divine, all loves excelling'. This hymn is all about a big, expansive, all-embracing God, and I have tried to capture this aspect of the words. The rising interval in the introduction is an important feature in developing the notion of a 'big God', and its reappearance near the end is intended to be very significant. The hymn is full of memorable phrases which will hopefully inspire players, singers and conductors as they contemplate the text in preparation for any performance. 'Joy of Heaven, to earth come down', 'Enter every longing heart', 'Finish then thy new creation', and then the last amazing four lines: 'Changed from glory into glory, Till in Heaven we take our place, Till we cast our crowns before thee, Lost in wonder, love and praise'. The addition of the organ in the last verse, by special request of Peggy and Scott Thomas who commissioned the arrangement, should add to the majesty of the music, but of course, it is not fundamental to any performance. May this music bring honour to our amazing God!' To view a rolling score video of this work please visit www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4dM0fZaVug Sheet music available from www.brassband.co.uk Difficulty Level: 4th Section + Length: 4.00 minutes Instrumentation: Soprano Cornet Eb Solo Cornet Bb Repiano Cornet Bb 2nd Cornet Bb 3rd Cornet Bb Flugel Horn Bb Solo Horn Eb 1st Horn Eb 2nd Horn Eb 1st Baritone Bb 2nd Baritone Bb 1st Trombone Bb 2nd Trombone Bb Bass Trombone Euphonium Bb Bass Eb Bass Bb Timpani Percussion 1-2 Organ (optional)

    In stock: Estimated dispatch 1-3 days
  • £54.99

    Land of Hope and Glory - Philip Sparke

    Elgar's five Pomp and Circumstance Marches were written between 1901 and 1930 with number 1 undoubtedly being the most popular of the five. King Edward VII told Elgar that the tune would 'go round the world' if words were fitted to it. Elgar took the hint and included it (with slight rhythmic changes) in his Coronation Ode of 1902, with words by A. C. Benson. Thus was born Land of Hope and Glory which is now, of course, an integral part of the annual Last Night of the Proms, when the audience (with varying degrees of success!) sing the words along to the original march. Now your brass band can enjoy all the pomp and ceremony of proms with this arrangement byPhilip Sparke.

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £54.99

    Land of Hope and Glory (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Elgar, Edward - Sparke, Philip

    Elgar's five Pomp and Circumstance Marches were written between 1901 and 1930 with number 1 undoubtedly being the most popular of the five. King Edward VII told Elgar that the tune would 'go round the world' if words were fitted to it. Elgar took the hint and included it (with slight rhythmic changes) in his Coronation Ode of 1902, with words by A. C. Benson. Thus was born Land of Hope and Glory which is now, of course, an integral part of the annual Last Night of the Proms, when the audience (with varying degrees of success!) sing the words along to the original march. Now your brass band can enjoy all the pomp and ceremony of proms with this arrangement by Philip Sparke.Duration: 2:30

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days

     PDF View Music

  • £10.00

    The Once and Future King

    DescriptionThe Once and Future King is a suite of three movements; each movement was inspired by an Arthurian legend. The first movement, 'Tintagel', concerns the famous Cornish promontory said to be the birthplace of King Arthur. In Arthur's time, Tintagel was part of the court of King Mark of Cornwall and the music imagines a visit by the King of the Britons to his Cornish neighbour and the place of his birth, reflecting the ceremony and drama of such an occasion; the music is strongly antiphonal, contrasting the more strident fanfares of the cornets and trombones with the warmth of the saxhorns and tubas.The second movement, 'Lyonesse', takes its inspiration from the mythical land which once joined Cornwall to the Isles of Scilly. One legend claims that after the disastrous battle of Camlan where Arthur and Mordred were both killed, the remnants of Arthur's army were pursued across Lyonesse to Scilly, whereupon Merlin cast a spell to sink Lyonesse behind them and drown the pursuers. Some say the bells of the 140 churches inundated that day can still be heard ringing. All the material in this movement derives from two short motifs heard in counterpoint at the very beginning, which are intentionally dissonant and bitonal in character.The final movement, 'Badon Hill', takes its title from the legendary site of Arthur's last battle with the Saxons and is a lively toccata based on the medieval secular song L'Homme Armee ('The Armed Man'). The music uses a number of medieval devices including "hocketing" (passing melody from one voice to another). The actual site of Badon Hill is unknown but it has been associated with Badbury Rings in Dorset and a lot of evidence now points towards the town of Bath. Arthur's victory at Badon Hill was the last great victory for Celtic Britain over the Saxon invaders, but in the end only set the conquest back by a few decades. Arthur himself was dead by then, betrayed and defeated by his nephew Mordred, but it is said that Arthur only sleeps and will return in a time of dire need - hence the legend that Arthur's dying words were: Bury me in Britain, for I am the Once and Future King.Performance NotesWhere space and practicality permits the opening movement should be played with cornets and trombones standing behind the band facing the audience; they should retake their seats for the second and third movements.PercussionConcert Bass Drum (ideally NOT Kit/Pedal Bass Drum), Suspended Cymbal, pair of Clash Cymbals, Glockenspiel, Snare Drum, Tambourine, 2 x Timpani (Eb-G, Bb-D), 2 x Tom-toms, Triangle, Tam-Tam* (only if available), Tubular Bells *(only if available).MutesBaritones, all cornets and trombones will require metal straight mutes; all trombones and cornets will require cup mutes.*The Once and Future King was set as the test-piece for the 3rd section of the Swiss National Championships in 2007. The score was then slightly revised in July 2008, the main alteration being the exclusion of the tubular bells part for the Regional Championships of Great Britain in 2009. Some parts which were optional (or cued on other instruments) at the request of the Swiss Brass Band Association were restored to their original octaves and instruments. In 2015 the tubular bells part was restored in the optional Percussion 3 part; all parts in Percussion 3 are optional, although some are cued in the percussion 1 & 2 parts (and the cues should be played if only two players are available).Listen to a preview and follow along with the score below!

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £30.00

    My Little Welsh Home - Traditional

    A beautiful arrangement by Tim Paton of a Welsh song by W S Gwynne Williams. Created in memory of his mother, Tim has produced a wonderful version for brass band and has also included an optional vocal solo or unison choir line.Comments from the arranger:I have arranged [My Little Welsh Home] in memory of my mother. [She] was born, Doreen Davies, on 27th November 1918, in Haverfordwest, Pembrokeshire, a small town in South West Wales. She had a beautiful voice, and met my father, Bill Paton, during World War II, whilst she was singing in a troop concert at the County Theatre in her home town, and my father was the MC.Throughout her life, my mother and father entertained, and she was singing right up until the final months of her life. She spent many years in Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, a seaside town in South West England, and it was here that she passed away on 20th September 2004. During the last several months of her life, she often referred to the song My Little Welsh Home:Here are the words.I am dreaming of the mountains of my homeOf the mountains where in childhood I would roamI have dwelt 'neath southern skiesWhere the summer never diesBut my heart is in the mountains of my homeI can see the little homestead on the hillI can hear the magic music of the RhyllThere is nothing to compareWith the love that once was thereIn the lonely little homestead on the hillI can see the quiet churchyard down belowWhere the mountain breezes wander to and froAnd when God my soul will keepIt is there I want to sleepWith those dear old folks that loved me long agoLooking at the words, I can see why it meant so much to her. Haverfordwest is at the foot of the Preseli Mountains, and her home and church were at the top of a hill. My mothers' ashes were taken back to her own little Welsh home, and laid to rest in the grounds of the church where she had been Christened, Confirmed and Married.Look and Listen (Score-reading digital sound-sample):

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £87.95

    Masquerade (Score and Parts)

    The first performance took place on the 4th. September 1993 at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester during the British Open Brass Band Championships.Note by Philip Wilby:Masquerade is a centenary tribute to Verdi's last opera Falstaff and takes its final scene as the basis for my own piece. Thus I have used some of Verdi's music, and some of Shalespeare's plot, and woven them into a fabric with highly demanding music of my own to produce a work in the great tradition of operatically-based brass band pieces. Such scores date from the very beginnings of band repertory and are often not direct arrangements in the established sense but new compositions produced in homage to a past master. They may still offer performers and audience alike something familiar interwoven with something new. My own piece reuses some elements from the original story: . .Falstaff has been caught in a web of his own lies by the ladies of the town, who propose to teach him a lesson. The story opens at night in Windsor Great Park. The plotters, variously disguised in Hallowe'en fashion (as fairies,elves hobgoblins etc!) assemble in the park to await Falstaff's arrival (musicologists will, perhaps, note a rare use of 'large bottle in F' being used during this scene of suppressed alcoholic revelry!). Falstaff's companions, Bardolph,Piston and Robin, enter (represented here by the three trombones!), and are variously abused by the masqueraders. At the height of the Tout an alarm sounds and Falstaff (euphonium cadenza) enters as Midnight strikes. From a safe hiding place he watches as the disguised Nanetta (principal comet) sings a serene solo as the moon appcars above the trees. With sudden force the others seize him and drag him from his hiding place. As in the traditional game 'Blind Man's Buff', he is roughly turned seven times (a sequence of solo accelerandi) until, at last, he recognizes his assailants as his sometime friends. Far from complaining, Verdi's character concludes the opera with a good-humoured fugue on the words.... 'All the World's a Joke... Every mortal laughs at the others, But he laughs best who has the final laugh. Philip Wilby.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £44.95

    Masquerade (Score Only)

    The first performance took place on the 4th. September 1993 at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester during the British Open Brass Band Championships.Note by Philip Wilby:Masquerade is a centenary tribute to Verdi's last opera Falstaff and takes its final scene as the basis for my own piece. Thus I have used some of Verdi's music, and some of Shalespeare's plot, and woven them into a fabric with highly demanding music of my own to produce a work in the great tradition of operatically-based brass band pieces. Such scores date from the very beginnings of band repertory and are often not direct arrangements in the established sense but new compositions produced in homage to a past master. They may still offer performers and audience alike something familiar interwoven with something new. My own piece reuses some elements from the original story: . .Falstaff has been caught in a web of his own lies by the ladies of the town, who propose to teach him a lesson. The story opens at night in Windsor Great Park. The plotters, variously disguised in Hallowe'en fashion (as fairies,elves hobgoblins etc!) assemble in the park to await Falstaff's arrival (musicologists will, perhaps, note a rare use of 'large bottle in F' being used during this scene of suppressed alcoholic revelry!). Falstaff's companions, Bardolph,Piston and Robin, enter (represented here by the three trombones!), and are variously abused by the masqueraders. At the height of the Tout an alarm sounds and Falstaff (euphonium cadenza) enters as Midnight strikes. From a safe hiding place he watches as the disguised Nanetta (principal comet) sings a serene solo as the moon appcars above the trees. With sudden force the others seize him and drag him from his hiding place. As in the traditional game 'Blind Man's Buff', he is roughly turned seven times (a sequence of solo accelerandi) until, at last, he recognizes his assailants as his sometime friends. Far from complaining, Verdi's character concludes the opera with a good-humoured fugue on the words.... 'All the World's a Joke... Every mortal laughs at the others, But he laughs best who has the final laugh. Philip Wilby.

    Estimated dispatch 7-14 working days
  • £24.95

    The Lost Chord - Arthur Sullivan - Robert Childs

    Sullivan composed The Lost Chord whilst watching at his brother Fred's bedside during his last illness. The manuscript is dated 13th January 1877, five days before his brother's death. He had been trying to set the words of Adelaide Procter...

    Estimated dispatch 4-7 working days
  • £63.99

    All The Best - Otto M. Schwarz

    "All the best!" These words expressing good fortune are often heard at occasions such as birthdays, or other changes life may bring. The music association in Rickenbach, Germany, wanted an upbeat concert work to celebrate its anniversary, as a kind of signature tune for the band. Otto M. schwarz had already composed several pieces in this genre, such as Fire & Ice, Last Call, and Funky Brass, to name but a few, and is constantly trying to transport new sounds and bold rhythmic ideas into the world of wind music. schwarz composes original works for wind band and his pieces are specifically tailored to exploit all the possibilities of this instrumentation. All the Best will be a huge success with musicians and audience alike, whether as a congratulatory piece, a concert-opener, or as a rousing encore.

    Estimated dispatch 5-14 working days

     PDF View Music