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  • £64.95

    A Tear in the Fabric of Time - Gareth Wood

    A Tear in the Fabric of Time is essentially a symphony for brass band and was inspired by the book The Elegant Universe by Brian Greene, which attempts to simplify complex ideas in modern physics for the layperson. This piece was dedicated to and written for the Buy As You View Band but was first performed by the National Youth Brass Band of Great Britain, conducted by Robert Childs in Summer 2006. The work is featured by the Cory Band on their recording The Promised Land (DOYCD218).A brassy, fanfare like introduction provides much of the material for the rest of the work.This leads into a dramatic 'Allegro' driving forward with brittle motives and stabbing chords. A euphonium melody accompanied by divided basses attempts to mellow the mood, but is unsuccessful as the music drives ruthlessly on! The centre of the work is a choral like Adagio; maybe the blackness of space or the darkness of human nature. A short episode leads into a 'Presto' which is a reworking of the first 'Allegro' relentlessly careering to a violent end! [Gareth Wood, 2006]

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £14.95

    Dance of the Tumblers - N. Rimsky-Korsakov

    Dance of the Tumblers comes from Rimsky-Korsakov's opera The Snow Maiden written in 1881. The story of the Snow Maiden deals with the opposition of the eternal forces of nature and involves the interactions of mythological characters; Grandfather Frost, Spring Beauty and Wood Sprite with half mythological characters, Snow Maiden and human characters.Dance of the Tumblers or Dance of the Clowns comes from act III of the opera, where the villagers are merry-making in preparation for the contest of wining the Snow Maidens heart to begin. It is skilfully arranged here for Tuba Quartet by Denis Burton

    Estimated delivery 5-7 days
  • £89.95

    INFINITY (Brass Band Set) - Robert Redhead

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £10.00

    INFINITY (Brass Band Study Score) - Robert Redhead

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £89.95

    Infinity (Brass Band - Score and Parts) - Redhead, Robert

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £44.95

    Infinity (Brass Band - Score only) - Redhead, Robert

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £10.00

    Infinity (Brass Band - Study Score) - Redhead, Robert

    In the post-modern age in which we live, 'absolutes' are difficult for many to comprehend. Yet infinity, which means absolute, total, all-embracing, having no limits or boundaries in time, space, extent, or magnitude, has always been central to the Christian's concept of God.Through the ages, as human understanding has grown, particularly at a remarkable rate from the latter part of the twentienth century, Christianity has been continually challenged to interpret traditional beliefs in the light of new discoveries, but always within the reality of the infinite Being. In addition, scripture tells us that 'humanity was made in God's image'. Humankind is part of God's creation and as such, responsible for its upkeep. Such a commission has never been more relevant than in this present age. Psalm 8 creates a great picture of the majesty, eternal, infinte quality of God and yet reveals the desire of God to share in spirit with humankind. It recognises humankind as being, not a tool of the infinite, but as a creative contributing part of the ongoing movement and activity of the infinite. The music is deliberately melodic in context, creating a sense of unity with the infinite, in tandem with the varying expressions of individuality. It is not based on the Psalm but reflects some of the sentiments lying therein. The 'hymn-like' theme expresses the nature of the Divine using the Old Testament image of the infinite God coming to finite humankind, not in the 'wind', the 'earthquake', the 'fire', but in the 'still small voice' of quietness (1 Kings 19: 11-13). The ensuing musical development, in different styles and patterns, expresses this continual link between infinite and finite. Thus the conclusion, rather than being a symbol of might, power and magnificence, reflects the same sentiment as the opening.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days