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  • £9.99

    I Heard the Bells on Christmas Day

    1The Little Drummer BoyKatherine Kennicott Davis arr. Mark FreehBlack Dyke Band4.112Fantasy on Two CarolsTraditional arr. Mark FreehBlack Dyke Band6.303The Spirit of the SeasonTraditional arr. Sandy SmithBlack Dyke Band5.504The Angels' CarolJohn Rutter arr. Howard LorrimanBlack Dyke Band3.275Jingle BellsJames Pierpont arr. Howard LorrimanBlack Dyke Band1.536O Come, O Come, EmmanuelTraditional arr. Richard A. DouglasBlack Dyke Band4.227Candlelight CarolJohn Rutter arr. Howard LorrimanBlack Dyke Band3.288That's the Spirit!Traditional arr. Sandy SmithBlack Dyke Band3.599What Child is This?Traditional arr. Mark FreehBlack Dyke Band2.2910The Toy TrumpetRaymond Scott arr. Mark FreehRichard Marshall (Cornet) with Black Dyke Band3.3211The Forres Cradle SongJames Scott Skinner arr. Sandy SmithBlack Dyke Band3.4012Parade of the Wooden SoldiersLeon Jessel arr. Mark FreehBlack Dyke Band2.5213Christmas LullabyJohn Rutter arr. Howard LorrimanBlack Dyke Band3.0114Here Comes Santa ClausOakley Haldeman arr. Mark FreehHarry Cunningham (Eb Bass), Jonathan Bates, Helen Varley and Alison Childs (Tenor Horns) with Black Dyke Band2.3615I Heard the Bells on Christmas DayJohn B. Calkin & Henry W. Longfellow arr. Mark FreehBlack Dyke Band2.3016Deck the HallsTraditional arr. Jack Arnold trs. Mark FreehBlack Dyke Band2.3117Petersburger SchlittenfahrtRichard Eilenberg arr. Sandy SmithBlack Dyke Band2.4518Silent NightFranz Xaver Gruber arr. Howard LorrimanBlack Dyke Band3.16

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £28.00

    IT'S A LONG WAY TO TIPPERARY (Brass Band) - Kerwin, Simon

    A great concert piece. "It's a Long Way to Tipperary" is a British music hall song written by Jack Judge and co-credited to, but not co-written by, Henry James "Harry" Williams. It was allegedly written for a 5 shilling bet in Stalybridge on 30 January 1912 and performed the next night at the local music hall. Judge's parents were Irish, and his grandparents came from Tipperary. It became popular among soldiers in the First World War and is remembered as a song of that war.

    Estimated delivery 12-14 days
  • £65.00 £65.00
    Buy from PHM Publishing

    A Wartime Sketchbook by William Walton, arr. Paul Hindmarsh

    During World War II, William Walton, one of the most eminent of British composers, provided music for several films deemed to be of 'national importance'. Scoring Lawrence Olivier's Shakespeare epic Henry V in 1943 was the most substantial of these wartime projects. His role in patriotic films from 1941 and 42 like The Foreman Went to France, Next of Kin, Went the day Well? and The First of the Few was to provide appropriate title music and some underscoring at key moments. Walton extracted the most substantial portions of the latter as the popular Spitfire Prelude and Fugue for orchestra. The remaining music remained unpublished until 1990, when Christopher Palmer assembled the highlights from the soundtracks into A Wartime Sketchbook, ssix numbers of which were arranged into a colourful suite for Besses o' th' Barn and Black Dyke Mills bands in the 1990s. 1. Prologue: This is the stirring title music from Went the day Well?, a screen play by Graham Greene about a German airborne invasion of an English village. The main theme leads to (2) Bicycle Chase, characteristic musical high-jinks for J.B.Priestley's The Foreman went to France. (3) Refugees, from the same film, is a poignant accompaniment to the long march of refugees, while (4) Young Siegfrieds is a lively movement comes from the music that Walton composed for The Battle of Britain in 1968, but which the film's producer rejected. It portrays first the Berliners, cheerfully ignoring the black-out and then, in the trio, the Young Siegfrieds of the Luftwaffe, courtesy of a parody of Siegfried's horn call from Wagner's opera. In (5) Romance from Next of Kin, a soldier and a Dutch refugee snatch a few tender moments together. (6) Epilogue: at the end of The Foreman went to France, the French look forward with hope and optimism to eventual liberation. Romance (3') and Young Siegrfireds (4') can be performed separately. Duration: 14 mins Published by arrangement with the copyright holders, Oxford University Press. ?65, plus postage and packingPHM Catalogue No. PHM008

  • £40.00

    In Gardens of Peace - Harper, P

    Composed to commemorate the life Henry Nichols, killed in the Battle of the Somme in 1917, the music has a peaceful tranquillity, but also a deep sense of tragedy and loss. It ends positively, with the wish that hope can come from desperation. Recorded by Glyn Williams with Cory Band.2nd section +Duration 5 minsListen to Glyn Williams (Euphonium) with Cory BandCourtesy of World of Brass

    In stock: Estimated delivery 1-2 days

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